Tag Archives: offshore wind farms

Offshore wind farm plans collide with fishing industry concerns off Carolina coast

The Biden administration’s plans to develop wind power off the East Coast are drawing concerns from the fishing industry, in the latest example of climate policy colliding with the livelihood of coastal businesses. Interior officials say they are aware of the concerns and are working on regulatory guidance that would lay out how wind farm developers can minimize harm to commercial and recreational fishing, while compensating businesses for losses. Wednesday’s auction is moving forward before officials finish that work. More lease sales are planned in the next two years for regions off the coast of California, the central Atlantic region and in the Gulf of Mexico. Without federal guidance, offshore wind developers have carved out their own settlements with local fishing groups. “Saddling project proponents with the costs of fisheries compensation would almost certainly have an adverse impact on ratepayers and/or project finance,” association officials said in a January letter to U.S. officials. >click to read< 14:50

Sites off Coos Bay, Brookings targeted for offshore wind farms by Biden Administration

Two areas off the Oregon Coast are being targeted to host offshore wind farms as the Biden administration seeks to ramp up renewable energy production. The U.S. Department of the Interior announced Wednesday that the locations being identified to potentially host wind farms are about 12 nautical miles offshore Coos Bay and Brookings. The areas comprise about 1.16 million acres (468,787 hectares) in total. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland described the upcoming steps taken toward possible leasing off the coast of Oregon as “another opportunity to strengthen the clean energy industry while creating good-paying union jobs.” Bullshit, Lady. >click to read< 12:39

Right whale defenders question energy industry donations

A group opposing wind projects off the coast of Massachusetts released a report Tuesday that documents contributions from wind energy developers to environmental groups in the state, donations that the authors of the report say cast questions on the ability of groups to analyze the impacts that wind projects have on the endangered North Atlantic Right Whale. The report, released by the Save Right Whales Coalition, catalogs $4.2 million between wind developers like Vineyard Wind, Bay State Wind, and Orsted to environmental groups in Massachusetts such as the Environmental League of Massachusetts, New England Aquarium, and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. >click to read< 09:35

Mayor Mitchell brags about New Bedford’s port status, but endorses projects that hurt fishing industry

“This was a really sad day for us. After 24 years of docking our lobster/fishing boats at Marine Hydraulics, the City of New Bedford has decided to eliminate 15 small commercial fishing berths to build the North Terminal. Ironically, the mayor said the project will add much-needed commercial fishing berths. Please explain??! I understand the need for the city to expand and adapt to future technologies but don’t totally displace the industry that put us on the map for the last 22 years and longer, especially small family businesses. >click to read< by Jarret Drake 16:34

Offshore wind farms being rushed through with ‘catastrophic impact’ on sea birds

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds said Government figures showed that 4,000 kittiwakes, which are classed as a vulnerable species, are predicted to be killed or displaced each year by poorly planned wind turbine developments. It comes after the Crown Estate, which owns the rights to develop the UK’s sea beds, announced it had sold concessions to build six vast offshore wind farms, enough to power seven million homes. It conceded that a new one off Norfolk would have a damaging effect on sea birds. But it stressed that ‘environmental compensatory measures can be secured to fully offset the potential harm’. >click to read< 13:58

‘It used to be just simple:’ Maine lobstermen concerned for future of industry

From new regulations to high fuel prices, some Maine lobstermen say they just can’t catch a break. Many are concerned for the future of the industry that is so much a part of Maine. Steve Train grew up lobstering. “I’ve just always had a love for this as a way to make a living,” Train said. Lobstermen are facing many obstacles, from offshore wind farms to impending federal fishing regulations meant to protect endangered right whales and even high fuel prices. photos, video, >click to read< 10:09

A Complicated Battle in the Gulf of Maine

It was two hours before dawn in the village of Friendship, but for a Maine lobster crew, it was already getting late. Captain Dustin Delano, his sternman, Chris, and his bait guy, Tim, moved in coordinated loops around the deck of the F/V Knotty Lady, stacking traps, thawing redfish heads and coiling lines to the gentle bass notes of engines rumbling below decks. In its own way, it had the feel of a chamber orchestra tuning up. Last cigarettes were lit, smoked and flicked away. And with that, we were off to the grounds. Soon, though, if things go according to a ruling by a federal court in Portland, that schedule would be thrown into chaos. In accordance with a recent modification to a federal whale plan, a 950-square-mile area of prime lobster fishing grounds was set to close in an effort to protect endangered North Atlantic right whales. Enter Green Energy – Where and how Maine would site farms to exploit this potential is an open question. >click to read< 11:09

Texas Tornado Takes Down Wind Turbines

The wind was too strong. Meteorologist Payton Malone shared a photo on social media that shows the impact a Texas tornado had on several wind turbines this week. As you can see here, the turbines were no match for winds that were estimated to be well over 130 mph. For the last couple of years, a hot debate on social media has been the use of wind turbines when it comes to producing energy. Many have already questioned what would happen to them if they were placed in the Gulf while a hurricane sweeps across it. Sorry, I don’t have the answer here. Video, >click to read< 11:22

North Carolina: Offshore wind turbines interfere with ships’ radar, ability to navigate

Gov. Roy Cooper and the Biden Administration want to make North Carolina carbon neutral by 2050, and President Biden’s ambitious plans to combat climate change lean heavily on offshore wind generation. The turbines could be a problem for fishermen. North Carolina’s fishing industry has largely been cautious in criticizing the wind turbines, saying it wants to wait for more information. “Demolition derby on the high seas thanks to offshore industrial wind turbines? Amy Cooke asked. “Add maritime navigation and radar challenges to the long list of reasons, including high cost, unreliability, environmental damage and misleading nameplate capacity, as to why offshore industrial wind is absolutely horrible public policy.”>click to read< 11:13

Who is the real Saudi Arabia of Wind? By David Goethel

I read the February 16th article by Teddy Rosenbluth, “New Hampshire is blowing its chance at offshore wind”, from the Concord Monitor, with interest and wished to offer some comment, both to the media covering New Hampshire, and the readers. By way of introduction, I am a research biologist and 54-year fisherman, both recreational and commercial, in the Gulf of Maine. First, I want to publicly thank both Governor Sununu and his energy spokesman, Assistant Commissioner of NH Dept. of Environmental Services, Mark Sanborn for taking a wise stand on collecting biological, ecological, economic and social implications of offshore wind development before leasing vast tracts of the Gulf of Maine. This stand is in marked contrast to other coastal governors and the Biden Administration, as well as European states, which have adopted a stance of build first and study later. >click to read< 20:18

Repeating the agenda “talking points”: Advocates say NH is blowing its chance at offshore wind – The Gulf of Maine, an area with strong and reliably blowing winds, is what Sen. David Watters called the “Saudi Arabia of wind.” >click to read<

Repeating the agenda “talking points”: Advocates say NH is blowing its chance at offshore wind

New Hampshire is uniquely positioned to benefit from one of the most promising areas for offshore wind development. Environmental advocates fear the state is blowing its advantage. The Gulf of Maine, an area with strong and reliably blowing winds, is what Sen. David Watters called the “Saudi Arabia of wind.” The area presents an opportunity to create thousands of jobs and move away from fossil fuels, supporters said at a press conference Wednesday morning organized by New England for Offshore Wind. “Offshore wind really is the biggest lever we have to move climate change action,” said Rob Werner, state director for the League of Conservation Voters. >click to read< 11:14

Save the Gulf of Maine – The Maine Reset, Ep. 4: Never Forgotten

Derek Colbeth grew up lobstering, and then served for 5 years in the US Marine Corps. Now he’s a civilian again, but his heritage and livelihood is under attack on all fronts. Powerful interests are converging in a war against Maine Lobstermen. If Lobstermen lose this fight, Maine will never be the same. >Video, click to watch< 14:35

Save the Gulf of Maine – The Maine Reset, Ep.3: This is an Experiment

In this episode, interviews with two brilliant people that you won’t want to miss regarding offshore wind development in Maine. Carla Guenther PhD brings an oceanography perspective, and Long Island Commercial Fisherman Steve Train lays out some practical wisdom as only a fisherman can. Sandwiched in there are some of my own antics lampooning the empty suits from corporations who want to confiscate our ocean., >Video, click to watch< 13:15 ocean industrialization

Fishermen feeling the squeeze as Scotland’s seas become overcrowded

Fishers are being crowded out of their traditional grounds by a combination of renewable energy developments and “excessive” conservation measures, they said. These pressures may lead to vast areas of Scottish waters being closed off or subjected to severe restrictions, they warned. “Coastal communities currently reap the benefits of the seafood brought back by our sustainable, modern, family-owned fishing fleet. “Profits from offshore windfarms will disappear into the budgets of private, wealthy, multinational energy firms.” >click to read< 10:05

Atomic Attraction: Wind Power’s Abject Failure Forces Europe to Embrace Nuclear Power

To call Europe’s rapid embrace of nuclear power ‘passionate’ is not overstatement. Much to the horror of wind and solar acolytes, a growing number of EU members are ready to declare nuclear power is not only clean and green, but wholly sustainable. Wind and solar-obsessed Germans and Brits are watching power prices go into orbit and the pro-renewables camp has been forced to grapple with months-long wind droughts when so-called ‘green’ energy couldn’t be bought at any price. Necessity may well be the mother of invention, but the stark realisation that wind power output can collapse for days and weeks on end is certainly the mother of a renewed attraction to nuclear power. >click to read< 11:16

Not Green: Offshore Wind ‘Industry’ Destroying Fishing Grounds, Birds & Marine Life

Taking wind turbines out to sea not only escalates the cost of the occasional power they produce, it destroys coastal landscapes, birds and other marine life. Millions of birds of battered out of existence by these things every year. And offshore turbines are driving puffins and other threatened species to the brink of extinction. Wind turbine noise has been proven to disrupt whales’ sonar guidance and communication systems, creating another threat to the already threatened North Atlantic Right Whale. The damage done by offshore wind farms to fishing grounds is met with practiced contempt by wind power outfits and malign indifference by their political enablers. >click to read< 11:21

Let Them Freeze: Wind & Solar Generators Couldn’t Care Less About Your Welfare

The wind and solar industries couldn’t care less whether you freeze to death when winter bites across the northern hemisphere and wind and solar output collapse. Solar panels plastered in snow and ice produce nothing; wind turbines frozen solid during breathless, frigid weather produce even less (they actually consume power from the grid to run heating systems meant to prevent their internal workings suffering permanent damage). So, if you’re sitting freezing in the dark, don’t expect wind and solar power generators to come to your rescue. No, if the lights and power are on this winter, then you ought to raise a glass for the gas, coal and nuclear power generators separating you and your loved ones from a date with hypothermia and, ultimately, the morgue. >click to read< 11:48

Save the Gulf of Maine – The Maine Reset Part 2, Fait Accompli?

First, we look at a basic chronology of the interplay between the State of Maine, the University of Maine, and private entities RWE Renewables and Diamond Offshore Wind (subsidiary of Mitsubishi) as they have joined forces in a venture of enormous importance. They partnered on a prototype of future wind turbines (Aqua Ventus I). Then they began working on an array of a dozen turbines. How many more turbines will follow? The wind developers have been clear that the first array is only the beginning of industrializing the Gulf of Maine. Then, we look in detail at some of the likely environmental impacts of industrial floating wind on marine life. It’s not a pretty picture. Yet, many large entities whose missions include protecting the environment have given ocean industrialization their blessing. Will they change their minds when they learn the full scope of impact?  Video, Click to watch<, Watch the first episode, Road to Disaster – Voices of Maine Lobstermen >click to watch< 11:01

Video: Road to Disaster – Voices of Maine Lobstermen

In the first installment of this series, we get a bird’s-eye view of the current status of Maine’s lobster fishery, which is under assault on two fronts. In this episode, we only hear from lobstermen and their advocates. (If you want to hear more of the opposing views of wind lobbyists, just read any given corporate media outlet’s coverage of this subject.) Upcoming episodes will bring in additional perspectives…there are a total of 20 different interviews that I conducted in 2021, so you will not want to miss these. Video by Jason Joyce >click to watch< 17:07

History repeating itself?

The Scottish Government have recently published a report with the headline Just Transition: A Fairer, Greener Scotland. A win-win situation one might think, profits for the government and a greener future to appease their Green Party colleagues in government. However, where there are winners; someone usually has to lose, so what is to be lost in this transaction and for whom? The loss here will be to every fishing community on the periphery of Scotland, with residents that harvest the bounty that nature annually provides from the seabed around our shores. That ability to harvest the seabed is now being stolen from the fishing communities, as it is being sold off to the highest bidders; by the new Crown Estate landowners, our own Scottish Government in Edinburgh. >click to read< By William Polson 09:55 – Scotland’s offshore wind sector gets $951 million boost as parts of seabed leased out – The Scottish offshore wind sector received a boost this week after a program to lease areas of Scotland’s seabed for wind farm developments raised just under £700 million (around $952 million). >click to read< 12:29

Offshore Wind Farms: Why Wind Power Expansion Plans Don’t Add Up

Akin to pushing on string, you can keep building these things ad infinitum and add nothing in terms of meaningful power generation capacity. It doesn’t matter whether a wind power fleet comprises a hundred, a thousand or a million wind turbines, when the wind stops blowing, they will deliver an almighty, collective doughnut. And it’s their frequent zero output efforts that bring us to the current net-zero madness. And despite the colossal failure of wind power to deliver during 2021, those pushing net-zero targets are pushing zero reliability targets, too. The UK ‘must build equivalent of worlds biggest wind farm every 10 weeks for next 20 years’ to hit net zero targets >click to read< 10:49

The Biggest Corporate Welfare Recipients Ever: Big Wind and Big Solar

How much do solar, wind and electric vehicle companies get in federal handouts and tax loopholes in President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better bill? Well over $100 billion in taxpayer largesse. If all the tax credits are included, that number could reach half a trillion dollars. No other industry in American history has ever received this lucrative paycheck. The folks at the Institute for Energy Research calculated that this is on top of the more than $150 billion in subsidies these industries received from Uncle Sam in the last 30 years. The umbilical cord to taxpayer wallets never gets cut. Yet, laughably, the left says all these subsidies to “green energy” are necessary for an “infant industry.” >click to read< 11:13

Fishing association says offshore wind farms being rushed through

Plans to build offshore windfarms west of Shetland are being rushed through, according to the Shetland Fishermen’s Association. Policy officer Sheila Keith said the industry “depends on these rich grounds” for catching. She said fishermen were “hugely concerned” that proper assessments into how the offshore wind industry will affect fishing are not being made. >click to read< 10:22

Fishing chief says wind projects bring ‘new challenges’ for Scottish fleet

The fishing industry has a key role to play in the energy transition amid a “spatial squeeze” in Scottish waters. That was the message from Elspeth Macdonald, chief executive of the Scottish Fishermen’s Federation,,, Ms Macdonald said fishers faced competition for territory from a range of other sectors, including aquaculture, oil and gas, and marine renewables. Marine protected areas are also a limiting factor on fishing opportunities, she added. And sea space is about to be “squeezed” even more by a raft of offshore wind energy developments as Scotland pursues its net-zero carbon emissions targets,,, >click to read< 11:36

Maine Lobstering: A Family Business Facing Challenges

“Today, we really face multiple challenges including competition for the bottom fishing ground with plans to erect windmill generators, to huge increases in the price of bait due to limiting the Herring catches. Just getting new buoys made is tough,” said Capt. Steve Train, a lobsterman of Long Island, Maine. “There is a year-long wait for new traps because there aren’t a lot of people building them. And there is the closing of the federal offshore fishing grounds with the implementation of new regulations as part of the 1973 Endangered Species Act. All these challenges are driving our costs up.” West Bath, Maine Capt. Peter Doran agrees the industry has always faced challenges. photos, video >click to read< 19:04

Offshore Wind Farms: ‘I am not yet convinced’

This rollercoaster of renewable energy developments is being built, we are told, to replace our dependency on the oil industry for our power supplies, but will it? The wind turbines will require regular maintenance and oil changes during their lifetime,,, But the maintenance of the offshore developments proposed in the seas around Shetland and beyond, in unpredictable and often extreme weather conditions will be a whole different matter. If the regular maintenance cannot be provided by sea, will it then be done by helicopter, what would be the environmental cost of that? Has the environmental cost of the lifetime maintenance of any of the windfarms been taken into consideration? >click to read< 07:23 By William Polson

Great ‘Green’ Job Hoax: Only China Profits From Making Wind Turbines & Solar Panels

The promise of thousands of jobs building wind turbines and solar panels is a renewable energy mantra; there are – but only in China. China itself is building nuclear power plants and hundreds more coal-fired power plants, as if its economic livelihood depends on it. Meanwhile, in those Western countries foolish enough to attempt to run on sunshine and breezes, those few jobs that did materialise are fast disappearing. However, as laid out below, don’t expect any meaningful or lasting employment. Unless, of course, you’re a Uighur slave building solar panels in a factory somewhere hidden in China.  >click to read< 12:26

Experts Slam Biden’s Plan To Build Taxpayer-Funded Offshore Wind Farms

Energy experts criticized President Joe Biden’s plan to prioritize wind farms, arguing wind power is costly, inefficient, and indirectly produces greenhouse gas emissions.,, On average, however, offshore wind produces just 45% of its energy capacity,,, “It is amazing that they’re touting wind at the very time when the EU is going through an energy crisis, in which they’re shutting down factories, fertilizer production, agricultural processing because their wind isn’t working,” ,,,“That the Biden administration is out there touting it and we want to go in the same direction they’ve gone in, I don’t know, you can’t make this stuff up,” >click to read< 21:08  Britain to Downgrade Renewables, Embrace Nuclear Power –  In the wake of Britain’s recent catastrophic wind drought, the Boris Johnson administration appears set to embrace nuclear power as their main strategy for achieving net zero. >click to read<

Offshore Wind Farms: As turbines rise, small-scale fishermen have the most to lose

David Aripotch is 65, a weathered man with gray hair, just tall enough to see over the helm. He has been fishing for almost a half-century, but he still gets excited every time the net is lifted from the ocean. It’s all the other things that eat at him. The federal fishing quotas that sometimes make him steam as far south as North Carolina to catch fish he can find off Long Island. The mind-boggling expenses of running a fishing boat: $5,000 a month for insurance, $30,000 for a new net, $60,000 for a paint job. Worst of all are the wind farms. “There’s so many things going against you as a commercial fisherman in the United States,” he said. “And now these wind farms, it’s almost like that’s the final nail in the coffin.” >click to read< (2nd article of 2 parts, >part 1<) 09:20

Biden plans to expand offshore wind farms to all US coasts

The Biden administration has unveiled plans to expand offshore wind energy farms in a move that could see turbines built along much of the US coastline.,,, The plan is expected to meet a backlash from some coastal and fishing communities, and it needs approval from state, local and environmental groups before any construction begins. Commercial fishing companies have argued such offshore wind projects would make it difficult to harvest valuable seafood species, like lobsters. Some conservation groups also fear the large turbines will kill thousands of birds and affect marine life. >click to read< 08:31