Tag Archives: lobster

Lobster back on the menu for recovering China

In a welcome sign that life in China returning to normal, tonnes of rock lobster has left Perth for Shanghai in the past few days.The lobster left on return flights after mining billionaire Andrew Forrest and the West Australian government organised the delivery of medical equipment from China.Separate to those flights, it is understood the first air shipment of seafood and other fresh produce under the Morrison government’s $110 million rescue package for exporters will depart on Thursday.The indications China has regained its appetite for high-end Australian produce comes with local consumers set to enjoy an abundance of seafood at rock bottom prices on Good Friday. >click to read< 16:39

How Effective Have China’s Agricultural and Seafood Tariffs Been?

There is a case that viruses (bird flu, swine fever, and now the coronavirus) have had almost as big an impact on Chinese-American agricultural trade as the trade war. (And more than most want to know on trade in crustaceans) The actual impact of the tariff though isn’t always quite as clear as many think, Take chicken feet (or chicken paws). Guess what really led to a fall in U.S. exports of chicken paws? Bird Flu. There may be a lesson there. Now consider one of the more prominent—at least judging by the press coverage—industries that has been hit by Chinese retaliatory tariffs in the recent trade war: lobster. But there are, in fact, markets other than China for U.S. lobsters, and suppliers other than the United States for China. Given the large two-way trade in lobsters between the United States and Canada,,, >click to read< 16:21

Coronavirus: Lunenburg lobster boat captain sells directly to consumers to stay afloat

It was shaping up to be one of Gail Atkinson’s best seasons ever, but then COVID-19 struck and the Lunenburg, N.S., lobster fisher had to get creative. Atkinson, who captains the Nellie Row, decided to keep her traps in the water even as prices plummeted. Now, she not only catches lobster, she also delivers it to customers in the Lunenburg area.,,, Atkinson is selling lobster for $8 a pound at the wharf and offering “contactless” delivery for customers near Lunenburg.,, Stephen Bond, co-chair of the Lobster Fishery Area 33 advisory committee, is taking the opposite approach. He applauds what Atkinson is doing, but said it’s not feasible for him given the size of his boat and crew. “There’s the select few, I’ll call them, that are able to follow Gail’s model or a smaller business model working with some of the local community, but it certainly doesn’t cover off the market that we’re missing,” >click to read< 19:55

Coronavirus impacts New England seafood industry as wholesale demand fades

The spread of the coronavirus has upended the seafood industry as restaurants close, fishermen tie up their boats and even big-money catches like lobster see lower demand, industry leaders say. Robert Nagle, vice president of Boston-based seafood wholesaler John Nagle Co., said the industry is trying to do all that it can as more fishing boats are tying up because of a decrease in demand. “If a boat can’t get enough money, they can’t pay their bills, they can’t pay their crews, the boat is not viable,” Nagle said. Live lobsters, which are usually sold to restaurants and exported around the world, have been essentially shut down with no one to buy catches, Nagle said. >click to read< 12:03

Fate of spring lobster fishery up in the air

“We recognize that current market conditions facing our industry are challenging, and the need to ensure that logistical support systems are in place to facilitate the movement and sale of seafood products.” The statement then points to the Canada Emergency Response Benefit that will pay $2,000 a month to anyone put out of work with COVID-19 as a mitigating factor. But with lobster licences going for nearly a half-million dollars in many harbours along the shore and the right to fish crab inshore going for around $130,000 per trap, that benefit doesn’t relieve the stress of recent buy-ins to this debt-driven industry. Buyers and processors also rely upon debt. >click to read< 09:19

PEIFA, minister update industry on COVID-19 impact

“The PEIFA will continue our ongoing dialogue with seafood industry representatives, the provincial and federal governments and any other sources of timely and factual information,” association president Bobby Jenkins and executive director Ian MacPherson said Monday through a news release. They stress that no decisions have been made yet, so there is no other information available to share. “The association is monitoring the situation on a daily basis and will be informing the membership through internal channels of any concrete decisions that have been made concerning the upcoming fishing season.” >click to read< 17:41

Seafood Connect! Maine Fishermen hold events to get products direct to customers

It’s first come, first served this weekend at Maine’s Working Waterfront – Seafood Connect event. In the midst of everything happening in the world, the local fishing community has been hit hard. This event will feature fresh seafood at an “off the boat” price. Any fisherman who is legal to sell is welcome. No preorders. Fishermen will decide what/if they are selling each week. As of May 4, the group will be switching from the Rockland location to the Reny’s in Camden. Bring bags to take your seafood home. Names, phone numbers, locations, product diversity! >click to read< 09:21

Coronavirus: Maritime lobster processors call for a minimum two-week delay opening the spring fishery

It’s the latest reaction to collapsed demand after measures to curb the spread of coronavirus shut down markets like restaurants and cruise ships around the world. The request is being taken seriously by lobster fishermen’s groups in eastern Nova Scotia, which have held conference calls since a letter from the processors, titled “Message to Canadian Lobster Harvesters,” was delivered March 23. The letter was written by Jerry Amirault, of the Lobster Processors Association of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, on behalf of “Canadian lobster processors.” >click to read< 09:46

Coronavirus: Global lockdown to hit China’s supplies of steak, lobster, wines

Just over a month ago, supply chains in China were thrown into chaos as trucks and planes delivering goods to the world came to a standstill. Now, China’s economy is moving back towards capacity, while the supply shock from the coronavirus pandemic is beginning to affect many Western countries, as they look to contain the virus’ spread. But this second round of supply shock enveloping countries around the world may mean China’s growing middle classes find themselves strapped for premium overseas food such as meat and dairy products,,, Video, >click to read< 11:26

Lobster buyers and processors call for shutdown of N.S. fishery as coronavirus guts world markets

Lobster buyers and processors in Nova Scotia want an immediate stop to all lobster fishing in the province because the coronavirus pandemic has crushed the markets for it,,, The industry association held an emergency conference call Thursday to discuss “the current unprecedented market situation.” The problem is that more lobsters are being caught than the industry or market can absorb. “The collapse of markets in the Pacific Rim, Europe and now North America make the challenge monumental as of today and for the short term future at least,” the summary states.  >click to read< 06:07

Lobster fishery temporary shutdown proposed by buyers for LFAs 33 and 34 due to ‘collapse’ of markets -“Over 75 companies participated in the conversation and agreed all lobster harvesters in LFA 33 and 34 should immediately stop fishing and that a variation order be issued by DFO,” more, >click to read< 09:58

Coronavirus: International turmoil keeps the lobster at home

Commercial fishing is a notoriously condition-dependent occupation. As of early February, however, in addition to the changeable sea and the here-today, gone-tomorrow nature of the work—as well as ongoing tariffs—local lobster fishermen like Brian Aresco of Carpinteria also had to contend with a ban on seafood imports due to the COVID-19 outbreak in their best market, China. Aresco said the price for lobster went from $16 a pound to $8 overnight. After expenses, he would be left with about $100 for 16-hours of work. more>click to read< 18:18

Coronavirus Breakthrough! Live lobster shipment from Nova Scotia to China resumes

For the first time in more than a month, live lobster from Nova Scotia has been flown to China, after fear of the coronavirus and travel restrictions caused market sales to plummet. Premier Stephen McNeil said just under 70 tonnes of live lobster were shipped from the Halifax Stanfield International Airport to China on Saturday, which is about two-thirds of a full flight. “We’re just hoping it’s the first of many,” McNeil told reporters at the legislature Tuesday. more, >click to read< 16:45

Retain and report American lobsters

American lobsters have been imported to the UK since the late 1950s for consumption in restaurants and homes. In 2015, 1744 tonnes were imported, worth £15.75 million. American lobsters tend to grow to larger sizes than European lobster, have a larger dietary range, are more tolerant of different habitats, are more aggressive and produce more eggs than European lobsters. This means they are at a competitive advantage over the native species. American lobsters might also carry the bacterial disease, Gaffkaemia, or Epizootic Shell Disease. Transferring these diseases to native stocks could result in major economic losses to the fishing industry. more, >click to read< 08:25

Maine’s lobster catch down in 2019 season, but the value stayed high

Maine lobstermen saw the overall catch drop in 2019, but prices remained high and many fishermen earned roughly the same amount they did the year before.,,The report shows the lobster catch was 100,725,000 pounds. That’s down more than 20 million pounds from the previous year, but because prices remained high, the value of the catch to fishermen totaled more than $485 million — nearly the same as the year before. Last year’s long, cold spring weather was blamed for the unusually slow start to the season, affecting water temperatures which, in turn, affect lobster. Video, more >click to read< 13:46

Knox County lobstermen earned $139 million in 2019 -The value of Maine’s commercially harvested seafood in 2019 was the second highest of all time at nearly $674 million, and an increase of more than $26 million from 2018. Knox County continued to be near the top in the state for lobster landings,, more>click to read< 15:14

P.E.I. Fishermen’s Association want answers about new whale restrictions

Among the new rules, Transport Canada has identified a sensitive area off western P.E.I. that it’s calling the Shediac Valley. Boats won’t be allowed in unless absolutely necessary, but exact boundaries have not yet been set. “The coordinates won’t actually be set until after the whales arrive,” said Melanie Giffin, marine biologist for the association. “So we don’t actually know the location of that box until the whales are here and aggregating. So there’s still some confusion around that.” >click to read< 11:48

Coronavirus: Seafood industry falls victim to the virus

Abalone fisheries, reliant on China for up to 90 per cent of sales, have been paralysed by the sudden drop in demand with Tasmania’s entire fleet of up to 100 abalone dive boats “ground to a halt” for the past month. Lobster was one of the first sectors to suffer as the result of China’s quarantine lockdowns, forcing the sale of export catches on the local market at discounted prices. The crisis has since broadened, affecting scale fisheries such as banded morwong and wrasse, and all processors reliant on China ­exports or live fish trade to deserted Chinatowns in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane. >click to read< 09:16

Coronavirus: Reverberations from COVID-19 reach Canada’s East Coast and its lobster fishery

Lobster fishermen, like Fralick, are facing a crunch. In the last month, the coronavirus epidemic in China has precipitated a drop in lobster prices. “It dropped from $10.50 all the way down to $6, and now it’s back up to $7,” says Fralick. “That takes all the profit out of it.” Quarantines and lack of restaurant traffic has slowed lobster demand from China. Customer orders have dried up. As a result, fewer cargo planes are making the trip. >click to read< 07:54

US-China Trade Deal: US lobster dealers anxious to resume business with China

Hugh Reynolds, a lobster dealer from Stonington, Maine, was excited to learn that the China-US phase-one economic and trade deal came into effect on Feb 14. According to the deal, China promises to purchase more agricultural products from the United States, and lobster is highlighted in the sector.,, Annie Tselikis, executive director of the Maine Lobster Dealers’ Association, said China accounted for 15 percent to 20 percent of the export value of US lobsters at the time. >click to read< 09:43

Lobster fisherman hopes to survive impact of coronavirus, rising costs

In Tasmania’s north-west, fisherman Scott Inkson is one of the lucky ones who may survive the impact of the coronavirus on the lobster industry. As COVID-19, as it is now known, continues to prevent live fish exports to China — his main market — he has decided to set up shop off his boat in Wynyard and give the community a cheap treat., “After 90 minutes on the wharf we completely sold out., King Island fisherman Mark Smith, 28, has struggled to sell his lobsters this season. >click to read< 23:15

Fishing protest in Royal Square – Unite and Keep Fighting!

More than a hundred fishermen marched in protest yesterday to the Royal Square, where they were promised ‘political intervention’ to overhaul a historic fishing treaty to allow the Island to take back control of its territorial waters. Many clad in their oilskins and dry-suits, they said they feared for their livelihoods as an increasing number of French boats competed with Jersey vessels for depleting stocks of brown crab and lobster. Sirens and air horns sounded in the Royal Square, where Environment Minister John Young vowed that action would be taken. >click to read< 17:51

From Gloucester NMFS protest, 2009, Fishermen Unite and Keep Fighting –  >click to watch<

The Voice Of The Lobster

Over in the Tweetiverse, someone was all boo-hoo about the eeevil effects of “climate change” that he claimed had “already occurred”. He referenced a publication from a once-noble organization that sadly has drunk the “CLIMATE EMERGENCY” koolaid, National Geographic. So I read it, and the only thing in that, other than what “might” and “probably” and “could” occur at some uncertain time in the future, was a mention of “oceanic heatwaves” in Maine and surroundings, viz: “The U.S. is already grappling with climate change’s heavy costs, like when a powerful ocean heatwave struck the Northeast and devastated the region’s lobster fishery.” As a long-time commercial fisherman, that piqued my interest. So I looked to see what I could find out. >click to read< 05:56

Maine Lobstering Union that’s suing its former CEO, hires a new management team

A lobster fishing cooperative that is suing its former CEO in federal court has hired two people to round out its new management team. Lobster 207 LLC, also known as the Maine Lobstering Union, has appointed Carmen Look as its chief financial officer and Brian Hemingway as its director of business development, the organization said Thursday.,,, The cooperative is alleging in a lawsuit that Pettegrow and his parents defrauded and stole from the union after selling it their wholesale lobster business for $4 million in 2017. The lawsuit pending in U.S. District Court in Bangor. >click to read< 12:39

As fishing industry becomes more lucrative, there’s increased demand for licences, vessels in Nova Scotia

New data from the Nova Scotia Fisheries and Aquaculture Loan Board shows Nova Scotia fishermen are taking out bigger loans to get into the lucrative lobster fishery.,, Brett Nickerson, a 27-year-old lobster fisherman from Cape Sable Island, used money from the loan board to get into the fishery. “I decided if I keep waiting and twiddling my thumbs, then I’m just gonna get older and end up doing it later in life,” he said aboard his boat, Miss Mackenzie, in Port La Tour, Shelburne County. >click to read< 08:00

Numbers on the Rise! Lobster might become one of the most important fisheries in Newfoundland

Warmer waters are getting part of the credit for an uptick in lobsters off the coast of Newfoundland and some companies are betting big on the crustacean’s future.,, In the last five years, lobster landing volumes have seen almost an 80 per cent increase, up to about 4,400 metric tonnes from roughly 2,100. While an impressive increase, those volumes are still small in comparison to the rest of the Atlantic provinces. For example, in 2017, the total volume of lobster harvested in Newfoundland represented just three per cent of what was harvested in the Atlantic provinces. >click to read< 08:40

Maine lobster group backs Canadian fishermen over right whale deaths

The president of the Maine Lobstermen’s Association, Kristan Porter, opposes a move to ban some Canadian seafood because of the deaths of endangered North Atlantic right whales in Canadian waters. “I think that doing that type of thing would only hurt the industry and not really solve the problem,” said Porter, a commercial fisherman from Cutler, Maine. Last September, nine conservation groups signed a letter urging the United States to ban Canadian snow crab imports when a new U.S. marine mammal protection act comes into force in 2022. >click to read< 07:54

Ventless trap survey seeks industry participants

The Maine Department of Marine Resources, in cooperation with the Gulf of Maine Lobster Foundation, is seeking industry participants for the Regional Ventless Trap Program through a competitive bid process. The cooperative research project between industry and scientists from Maine to New York seeks data on relative lobster abundance and size distribution. All traps, line and buoys will be supplied to participating fishermen, >click to read< 10:14

P.E.I.’s fall lobster fishermen raise concerns about ghost fishing

A fisheries officer attending the annual meeting of the Prince County Fishermen’s Association said the amount of lost or abandoned lobster gear retrieved from the Northumberland Strait lobster grounds after the fall season ended was “extremely high  said fisheries officer Anthony Cheverie. Cheverie said gear was retrieved throughout Lobster Fishing Area 25 (LFA 25), which takes in fishermen from P.E.I., New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. Laura Ramsay, with the P.E.I. Fishermen’s Association, said fishermen are concerned about the amount of lost gear and agreed Canadian regulations “make it hard for fishermen to help go clean up that gear”. Gear Innovation Summit planned for Feb. 11, 12,  >click to read< 10:20

Fishermen clash over fishing rights across the Maritimes, tensions are running high

Canada’s highest court has refused to hear a Mi’kmaw fisherman’s appeal to have legal costs covered in a lawsuit against Ottawa – a potentially groundbreaking case seeking to define treaty fishing rights. The case comes as clashes between non-Indigenous and Indigenous fishermen intensify across the Maritimes. Observers warn the simmering tensions could lead to violence if the “moderate livelihood” fishery described in Donald Marshall Jr. case two decades ago is not clarified.  “By not dealing with it, the government is responsible for continued conflict in the fishery.” >click to read< 08:55

The U.S.- China trade agreement will slow Canadian lobster sales to China

Even though a new U.S.-China trade agreement does not eliminate heavy Chinese tariffs, the deal will result in a loss of Canadian seafood sales to China,,, Canadian live lobster exports to China, mostly from Nova Scotia, soared after China slapped retaliatory tariffs of 35 per cent on U.S. lobsters. U.S. lobster exports tanked while Canadian sales jumped,,, The new trade deal does not lower those tariffs. But China has pledged to buy $32 billion worth of American agricultural products over the next two years, including lobster and other seafood products. >click to read< 17:38

“Earlier in the season it looked like it could be bad,” – Maine lobster landings down about 16% last year, commissioner says, but still beat expectations

“They caught a lot of lobsters in the last few months of the year and made up a lot of ground.” Keliher told the show’s hosts that initial landing reports suggest the lobster industry would finish 2019 with a 100 million-pound harvest. If that number holds, it would be 16 percent lower than 2018’s 119.6 million pounds landed, and nearly 15 percent less than the five-year average. On Tuesday, Keliher said Maine’s most valuable fishery, which had a dock value of $485 million in 2018, seemed to be in good shape. >click to read< 08:22