Tag Archives: lobster

Fall lobster fishery now underway in Digby and rest of LFA 35 district

Lobster Fishing Area (LFA) 35 opened at 12:01 a.m. on Oct. 14 with the 93 full time and four part-time licence holders in the district heading to the fishing grounds in the upper Bay of Fundy. “When the season opens and the Digby fleet is coming through the gut,” looking from Delap’s Cove, “there’s a false sunset inside the Annapolis Basin,” said Colin Sproul, president of the Bay of Fundy Inshore Fishermen’s Association. “There’s 60 or 70 boats coming out of there with four or five crabs’ lights each. You can see it right over the north mountains. It’s unbelievable. It’s like a sunset coming out of the basin at midnight.” >click to read< 18:40

China tariffs sinking overseas sales, Provincetown lobstermen not feeling the pinch

“It’s killed our price. It’s killed our markets,” said state Rep. Ann-Margaret Ferrante of Gloucester.,,, Multiple Massachusetts businesses, especially those in Gloucester, have been adversely affected as they cannot compete with Canadian wholesale prices. But the lobstermen themselves are not feeling the pinch, and if anything are seeing their prices rise, Massachusetts Lobstermen’s Association Executive Director Beth Casoni said. “The fishermen are happy,” Casoni said. “They’re making money.” >click to read< 09:29

PEIFA joins MFU in seeking mid-summer lobster-fishing ban

“After 20 years of lobster research from the government of Canada and our science affiliate, Homarus, we understand just how important the mid-summer (July 7 – Aug. 7) is for the hatching and development of lobster larvae into juvenile lobsters,” MFU executive director, Martin Mallet said. ”Any fishing activity during this time has an extremely negative effect on several key biological processes for lobster, including moulting, extrusion of new eggs and hatching of eggs that are in the final stages of development.” >click to read<  08:54

Fylde coast team nets Canadian success with revolutionary lobster pots

A Fylde coast firm has landed an international deal in its bid to revolutionise the world of lobster fishing. Bob Norburn and Steve Simpkin are re-thinking the traditional wood lobster pots used to catch the crustaceans, making the traps more environmentally friendly and safer for fishermen. And now they have secured a patent for the design and signed a contract with a firm in Canada. >click to read<  11:07

Legislators, lobstermen press case against ‘draconian’ whale rules

Two area legislators led a delegation Wednesday to the Maine Attorney General’s Office to press their case for a full representation for the state’s lobster industry against what they say are draconian and unjustified measures being proposed by the federal government to protect right whales. Independent Reps. Jeffrey Evangelos of Friendship and Bill Pluecker of Warren met Sept. 18 with Attorney General Aaron Frey and two staff attorneys who represent the Department of Marine Resources. >click to read<  11:25

New study addresses changes in lobster molt timing, Gulf of Maine temperature shifts

Variation in lobster molt timing has been increasing in recent years, and is related to changing ocean temperatures in the Gulf of Maine,,, Creating a time series for lobster molts and outlining the relationship of the initial intra-annual molt season to bottom water temperatures in the Gulf of Maine is important to the lobster industry because shifts in water temperature could result in changes in timing of the molt season, led by then UMaine graduate student Kevin Staples, who was pursuing a dual master’s degree in marine biology and marine policy. >click to read< 09:45

MLA Decision Disappoints, NOAA will continue to work with the Maine lobster industry

Although the Maine lobster industry formally withdrew its support of the near consensus agreement, members of the Maine caucus have stated a willingness to continue to work with the agency, the Take Reduction Team, the state of Maine, and their members to identify measures that address the risk that the Maine lobster fishery poses to right whales. We stand ready to continue to assist Maine in whatever way possible to achieve the necessary level of risk reduction to these critically endangered whales.,, >click to read< 13:27

Sea Grant awards $2 million to advance understanding of American lobster, support industry

Sea Grant announced new funding today for research aimed at understanding physical and chemical changes affecting American lobster (Homarus americanus) in the Gulf of Maine as well as a regional lobster extension program. Collectively, the research projects and regional extension program comprise the Sea Grant American Lobster Initiative. The seven research projects were chosen through a competitive processes that included review by subject matter experts. The research competition solicited proposals aimed at addressing one or more of the following priorities: >click to read< 10:21

If you think lobster prices don’t affect you, think again

A recent social media post made by a local marketing firm sharing a photo of a shirt being sold in town that says “Make Lobster $1.97 lb. Again” stirred some controversy. Although it was intended to be a “joke,” it was no joking matter for many of us in the lobster industry. We remember all too well in the early 1990′s when lobsters were indeed this cheap, and how we were hurting. No one in dairy country would joke about milk being $1 a gallon, as most people are well aware of the struggles farmers face,,, Farmers feed our country – and so do American commercial fishermen.,, Right now, more than ever, Maine lobstermen need the public’s support. Maine lobster is well worth every penny paid for it. by Shelley Wigglesworth >click to read< 16:29

$20M in fed funding will help lobster industry claw back lost market share

Food Export USA-Northeast said it will use more than $20 million in federal funding to help seafood suppliers tap into new markets, with a special focus on the lobster industry. The Philadelphia-based nonprofit association unveiled the plan and new funding through the U.S.D.A’s Agricultural Trade Promotion Program in a press release Wednesday. It said the group will use a “significant portion” of the amount over the next few years to open new export markets for selected regional suppliers, educate importers and connect the industry to a broader range of international buyers. >click to read< 12:17

Politics & Other Mistakes: Lobster lovers versus blubber lovers

In Maine, hardly any restaurants serve whale. For good reasons. Whales are endangered, so any chef who offers the giant mammals as the fresh catch of the day is guaranteed to incite protests, vandalism and the sort of caustic online reaction usually reserved for racist remarks from the president. Also, I have it on good authority that whale meat is very gamey. At best, it’s an acquired taste. On the other hand, right whales weigh as much as 70 tons, which means just one could supply the average sushi bar with the makings of enough gunkan maki for every hipster in Maine.,,, But the real villain isn’t Herman Melville. According to prominent environmental groups, it’s the lobster. by Al Diamon  >Click to read< 12:16

Maine fishing practices at center of debate about endangered right whale

Hutchings thinks the looming regulations to save the right whale, an endangered species, are only part of the problem with the industry. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is proposing the new rules. He would like to continue fishing lobster for a few more years to be able to say he spent 50 years as a fisherman, but said he feels more financial constraints every year. “I’d hate to be a young guy starting out,” Hutchings said. “ … It (NOAA) should be more worried about the fishermen becoming extinct.” >click to read< 11:49

About 70 frustrated fishermen tell feds at a hearing in Machias that Canada, not Maine, is mostly to blame.

About 70 fishermen came to the first fisheries service public meeting in Maine on the latest round of lobster rule changes being considered to protect the endangered whales. They expressed safety fears and their mounting frustration. The state’s $485 million-a-year lobster industry is facing a federal mandate to lower the number of buoy lines in the Gulf of Maine by 50 percent to protect right whales.,,, >click to read< 12:09

Rope free traps? Company studies ways for fishing nets and whales to coexist.

“It’s promising and many people are asking why we don’t use it right away — but it’s still in the scientific testing phase, with tests being done in the water and it has not yet been adapted for commercial fishing,” Cormier explained. In some trials, the buoy took up to 30 minutes to surface; in other cases it never surfaced. “There is still work to be done as far as the reliability of the equipment,” he said. “We don’t want to create another problem, that of ghost fishing.” >click to read< 09:49

Maine lobsterman John McInnes seems to have a knack for catching colorful crustaceans

Last month, he hauled in a rare cotton-candy-colored lobster in Casco Bay, near Portland. That would be remarkable story on its own, but McInnes said this is the second time he’s caught this particular lobster. “I caught it last October, and it was too small to keep, and then I caught it again,” McInnes said. “I caught it last October, and it was too small to keep, and then I caught it again,” McInnes said. “It was probably a mile and a half away from where I let it go. It didn’t go far.” >click to read< 08:42

Maine’s lobster industry needs your help

A little over a week ago, we saw more than a thousand lobstermen flood the Stonington commercial pier. Almost the entire Maine delegation attended in person to demonstrate its support for lobstermen who are being unfairly targeted around the issue of right whale entanglement. Also speaking and demonstrating their support were Maine Governor Janet Mills, State Senate President Troy Jackson and several other state elected officials. by Julie Eaton >click to read< 12:10

Prince Edward Island: With no size increase, fishermen optimistic of good catch rates

Prince Edward Island fall lobster fishermen set out from ports from Tignish to Victoria on Thursday morning as their fall season officially got underway at 6 a.m The fishery takes in the western half of the Northumberland Strait and also involves mainland fishermen from Chatham, N.B., to Amherst, N.S. Video, >click to read< 11:29

Lobster processing claws its way into Mass. law

The long-sought measure to expand and modernize lobster processing regulations in Massachusetts is now law, as of Gov. Charlie Baker’s signature on Wednesday.,,, Senate Minority Leader Bruce Tarr, R-Gloucester, who has championed the measure through more than four frustrating legislative cycles, estimated that up to 80 percent of lobsters landed in Massachusetts — the nation’s second-largest harvester of American lobsters, behind Maine — are transported to out-of-state processors only to see them return here as value-added products for retail and restaurant consumers. >click to read<  09:11

Lobsters claw their way back to freedom

At the fifth annual ceremony, Island visitors and residents stood beside members of the Buddhist center as Karma Trinlay Rinpoche blessed the lobsters with sacred water and herbs. Then folks took turns picking up the lobsters and placing them gently into the harbor, where the powerful current will carry them far away from human dangers such as lobster pots and pollution. The lobsters were purchased from the Menemsha Fish Market and cooled before the ceremony in order to make the lobsters lethargic and prevent fingers from getting pinched. >click to read< 10:10

Slow lobster season so far in Maine, but price is steady

It’s been a slow lobster season so far in Maine, but the lack of crustaceans isn’t translating into high prices for consumers, and fishermen are still hopeful for a bump in catch this summer.,,, The season so far is similar to the lobster hauls veteran fishermen saw in the 1980s and 1990s, when the boom in catch typically came later, said Steve Train, a lobsterman based in Long Island. It’s frustrating for those who are used to the big, early catches of the modern era, he said. >click to read< 15:11

Greenhead Lobster cuts ribbon on Bucksport plant

Greenhead Lobster owner Hugh Reynolds held a huge pair of scissors aloft as he cut the ribbon on a 15,000 square foot lobster processing facility on July 19, extending the Stonington business into Bucksport. “We’ve brought innovation and technology to allow people to taste lobster as it would be fresh out of the water,” Reynolds said. The facility will take lobsters caught in Stonington waters and use hyperbaric pressure to kill pathogens and extend its shelf life to at least 30 days. Greenhead is targeting the domestic market, after trade tariffs have affected global markets, like big lobster importers China. >click to read< 12:19

Maine political leaders join lobster haulers to rally against new rules

Gov. Janet Mills and almost all of Maine’s congressional delegation will participate in a rally Sunday protesting new federal regulations aimed at protecting the endangered North Atlantic right whale, but also could cause large-scale disruption in this state’s lobster industry. Maine lobstermen support protecting the whales, whose numbers have dwindled to fewer than 420 during the past decade, but say that the new regulations,,, >click to read< 12:56

Lobster prices range from $7 to $8 per pound in Cape Breton

Lobster fishermen in Cape Breton are getting $7 or more a pound for the last two weeks of the season.  Starting prices were $7 and they dropped to $6.50 for a couple of weeks before rising again to $7 for many Cape Breton lobster fishermen. However, some are getting $7.50 or $8 a pound based on who the buyer is. “I don’t understand why in parts of Nova Scotia (like the South Shore) they get fifty-cent more than we do when we’re supposed to have the best product here in Eastern Nova Scotia,” said Garren O’Neil who fishes out of Main-à-Dieu and gets $7 a pound. >click to read< 12:29

N.B. baby rides ‘rare’ gigantic lobster on lucky Canada Day catch

“Some kids get to ride a pony, not my grand nephew Ace,” said proud uncle Ed McHugh who shared pictures of his 12-pound nephew Ace on Facebook riding a gigantic lobster in Black River, N.B. The lobster was caught on Canada Day by Ace’s father, Nathan Crawford, who works as a lobster fisherman. The lobster was a 17 pounder, the first Crawford has ever seen. >click to read< 13:22

Deer Isle lobstermen offer whale rule alternative

For Maine lobstermen, 2019 is likely to bring a summer of discontent. Fuel prices are high. Cuts in herring fishing quotas — with further cuts likely — mean that bait is likely to be extremely scarce, and whatever’s available extremely expensive as the season develops. And that’s the good news. What really has lobstermen worked up is the demand by federal regulators that they reduce the risk of death or injury to endangered right whales in the Gulf of Maine by 60 percent.,, Deer Isle lobsterman Julie Eaton had a number of suggestions for DMR,, “Was any thought given to the glut of gear that’s going to develop and to the safety of the fishermen?” >click to read<11:29

Its not Lob-ter, Jeremy. Its Lob-stah. – Jeremy Roenick provides shenanigans while lobster boating

In the latest edition of “Where in the World is Jeremy Roenick?” (not an actual title … yet?), we get some fun video footage of JR “hunting” for lobster in Boston before Game 5 of the 2019 Stanley Cup Final. Roenick has a fun time with Captain Fred Penney of Two Buoys Lobster Tour. If you’re familiar with JR’s antics with locals, you’ll know that shenanigans will be had, and JR does not disappoint. >Video, click to read< 08:14

Lobster prices – ‘There is a problem with the whole system and it has to be addressed’

The group that markets P.E.I. lobster says this year’s price is good, but could be better. The Lobster Fishers of P.E.I. Marketing Board says fishermen are getting a bit more than last year — between $5 and $5.75 for canner lobsters which are smaller and $6 to $6.75 for larger markets, said the group’s chair and fisherman Charlie MacGeoghegan. He said fishermen in Nova Scotia are getting more for their lobster. “If you take 2018 versus 2017 it was over a dollar a pound in the difference between Nova Scotia and here, so that’s, on last year’s catch that’s $38 million.” >click to read<12:55

The gear is coming ashore in Southwestern N.S. as lobster season draws to a close

Lobster fishermen in southwestern Nova Scotia are landing traps, buoys, rope and anchors by the boatload this week as May 31 marks the end of the six-month lobster season. The season opened on Dec. 1 after a five-day weather delay for fishermen in Lobster Fishing Areas 33 and 34, with a record opening shore price of $7 a pound that jumped to $9 by mid-December, peaked at $11 in April, and is expected to close at $7. Bernie Berry, president of the Coldwater Lobster Association said overall if it ends up being a decent season, it’ll be mostly because of the price. The price was important as catches do appear to be down, according to what fishermen have been reporting. >Photo’s, click to read<09:55

Maine turns to Canada after losing China lobster market

The Maine lobster industry is switching to other markets – as far away as Thailand and Vietnam and as close as Canada. Maine-based lobster companies are opening operations in Canada and shipping lobsters from Nova Scotia because Canada isn’t affected by the US-China trade dispute. That reflects what Bill Bruns, operations manager of The Lobster Co in Arundel, has seen in his own export business. As a result, trade in lobsters from Canada is booming.,,, Ready Seafood of Portland, Maine, last fall acquired L. Walker Seafoods, >click to read<13:24

Fishermen say price is right this year for northern shrimp and lobster

Shrimp and lobster prices have plummeted in recent years, but what about this season? Fishermen say the price is right.  Video, >click to watch<13:25