Category Archives: Mid Atlantic

Investigating How Atlantic Sea Scallop Larvae Move Through A Fishery

A recent collaborative study from researchers at Rutgers University, Old Dominion University, University of Southern Mississippi, and NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center shows that scallop offspring – also known as larvae – can move among regions of the fishery, even though the fishery itself spans a huge area of the ocean off the east coast of the US. Scallops and other bivalves like oysters, clams, and mussels produce microscopic, free-swimming larvae. These larvae can, in some cases, traverse great distances,,, >click to read<21:19

Virginia escapes sanction — for now — that could shut down menhaden fishing

A threat to shut down Virginia’s menhaden fishery disappeared after an interstate commission decided it wouldn’t find the state out of a compliance with a new quota for the oily fish. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission cut the quota for menhaden caught in Chesapeake Bay by purse-seine vessels by 42 percent back in 2017 — but the General Assembly balked this year and last at enacting that lower quota into state law. This month, the commission indefinitely postponed taking any action to find Virginia out of compliance, a finding that could trigger a federal moratorium on the fishery. >click to read<10:51

On the waterfront, a special breed of Long Islanders toils in winter

Working on the water sounds like such a great idea. After all, you’ll have a bay or ocean for your daily view, a fresh sea breeze and plenty of sunshine throughout the year. Many watery jobs will also keep you in shape. Imagine lifting crates of oysters, hauling fishing nets, building bulkheads or working as a party-boat mate. For those who love to be outdoors, these jobs hold special allure. Then winter rolls around. And sunny skies, warm weather and inviting breezes morph into roiling waves, sleet, snow and ice, and bone-chilling winds that roar day after day. >click to read<16:10

The Work We Do: Nate Phillips, Alice’s Fish Market

[I’m] Nate Phillips, Alice’s Fish Market. It’s a family-owned business for 26 years. I grew up in the fishing industry. I was actually brought home from the hospital straight to the boat. Before they even brought me home, it all kind of started there. You get to see stuff that a lot of people don’t. We do a lot of farmer’s markets. The people that come to those farmer’s markets, they want fresh seafood. >click to read<

Reintroduced Shark Trade Bill Promotes Successful U.S. Conservation Policies at Policies at Global Level

The Sustainable Shark Fisheries and Trade Act of 2019 – A bipartisan bill introduced in the U.S. House advances global shark conservation by ensuring that all shark and ray products imported into the United States meet the same high ethical and sustainability standards required of American fishermen. The bill has broad support from conservation groups, zoos, aquariums and the fishing industry. >click to read<13:14

Watermen get say on how to tackle ‘ghost pots’ in the Chesapeake Bay

“Ghost pots” remain a menace in the Chesapeake Bay, but how big a menace and what to do about them is anybody’s guess. That could change now that the 1,056 hard crab fishermen licensed in Virginia are getting a chance to have their say. Researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science are mailing surveys to watermen asking for their ideas on the countless crab pots that, for any number of reasons, end up haunting the bay, trapping and killing crabs and other hapless creatures that crawl or swim inside. >click to read<14:58

Thiele Withdraws Support For South Fork Wind Farm

State Assemblyman Fred Thiele has announced he has withdrawn his support for Deepwater Wind’s South Fork Wind Farm. In a press release issued on January 24, Thiele said two events led to his about-face. The first was the announcement in May that Deepwater had been sold to Orsted, a Danish energy company and a major player in offshore wind. A second factor, Thiele said, was Orsted’s decision to expand the capacity of the wind farm from 90 megawatts to 130 megawatts by building larger turbines. >click to read<, thank you Gary, and thank you Fred Thiele.19:41

There’s Something Fishy About Our Fish

Charlie the Tuna does plenty of business in these parts. That’s because a lot of what we think is grade A tuna is anything but. The same goes for wild salmon, lemon sole, red snapper, and a dozen other species of premium priced fish.,, A recent study by the New York State Office of the Attorney General found that fraud is much more widespread than originally realized — it costs consumers and fishermen millions of dollars a year. >click to read<

Please donate to New Jersey Fisherman James Lacey’s Memorial Fund

Today we mourn the loss of our brother, son, cousin, uncle, and friend James Lacey. Jim died when the fishing boat he worked on capsized in the waters off the Oregon coast. (Full story.) We always knew Jim had one of the hardest jobs in the world and he wouldn’t have it any other way.,,, We’re raising money to help return his remains to the east coast so that he can be laid to rest. Any additional funds raised will go to support charitable causes that support the families of fisherman lost at sea. Thank you for your generosity, your thoughts, and your prayers. May he rest in peace. >click to read, and please, donate if you can.< Thank you.10:18

3 Fishermen dead after fishing boat capsizes crossing Yaquina Bar bar

The Mary B II crab boat capsized about 10 p.m. Tuesday, according to the U.S. Coast Guard. >click to read< U.S. Coast Guard.Authorities have released the identities of three men killed when a fishing boat capsized in rough waters off the Oregon coast. The Oregon State Police said in a statement the victims were James Lacey, 48, of South Toms River, New Jersey; Joshua Porter, 50, of Toledo, Oregon; and Stephen Biernacki, 50, of Barnegat Township, New Jersey. Authorities say Biernacki was the skipper of the Mary B. II. >click to read<16:23

2 commercial fishermen from N.J. among 3 dead after boat capsizes off Oregon coast – >click to read<

Our surf clam fishery is headed for disaster

When it comes to fishery management controversy never seems to be too far away. Last month you may have read about the dubious nature of a decision by the New England Fishery Management Council to close a large area of Nantucket Shoals to fishermen who harvest surf clams there, ostensibly to protect fish habitat. Questionable actions such as these undermine industry confidence in fishery regulators and serve only to alienate, and embitter, fishermen and the many others on the waterfront whose livelihoods are threatened by such draconian measures.  >click to read<20:47

Fishing industry could be endangered by planned wind turbines

Whatever the future for large scale off-shore wind farms in New England, New Bedford and its first in the nation fishing industry will feel the effects. Renewable energy from sources which include off-shore wind, are an undeniable part of our future. It’s a fair question though whether commercial fishing as it now exists in southern New England, will survive the installation of the largest and most extensive array of ocean based wind turbines in the world. The offshore wind lease areas in federal waters overlay some important fishing grounds and navigation transit areas for the commercial fishing fleet which sails from our coast. The project furthest along in the leasing process is being pursued by Vineyard Wind,,, >click to read<21:41

Ghost Fishing Off Long Island’s Coast

On the deck of the vessel Christine & Jennifer, a dozen tiny mud crabs, each smaller than a fingertip, scuttle out of a rusty lobster trap. The crabs move sideways, exploring the edges of these newly discovered surfaces with their long thin legs. Dan Kuehn, a research technician at the Cornell Cooperative Extension, a nonprofit agency affiliated with Cornell University, inspects the next lobster pot. Something is moving among the wires. He peers inside and says: “One undersized lobster.”  Kuehn cradles the small lobster in his hands. This one is lucky — it’s still alive. >click to read<15:46

New Jersey: Offshore-wind developers and officials won’t reveal key details of proposals

There’s a lot at stake for utility customers who may end up subsidizing projects to the tune of billions of dollars. Three developers are vying to build offshore-wind farms aimed at achieving the Murphy administration’s goal of building 1,100 megawatts of capacity off the Jersey coast in a process that is emerging as increasingly opaque. Details of the projects, to be subsidized by potentially billions of dollars from electric customers in New Jersey, were not forthcoming from either the state Board of Public Utilities nor the developers.  The lack of transparency about the offshore-wind projects is not a new development. >click to read< 14:22

A Seafood Institution Is for Sale

Stuart’s Seafood Market in Amagansett has changed hands only a few times since Stuart Vorpahl Sr. established a fish packing business on the Oak Lane property in the first half of the 20th century, but soon, it will change hands again.  Word went out last week that Bruce and Charlotte Sasso, its owners since 1997, are selling the popular market. When they first opened on Jan. 2, 1997, the Sassos had two employees. Twenty-two years later they have 25 and have expanded from selling fish and basic pantry items to offering cheeses, olive oils, vinegars, gourmet,,, Stuart’s is the longest continuously run fish market in East Hampton Town. Started as a packing station for the fish Mr. Vorpahl and his sons had caught and were sending to the Fulton Fish Market in New York City, by 1951 it had become Stuart’s Market, with a retail operation and a packing house. photo’s, > click to read<21:52

Gov. Cooper leads bipartisan effort to oppose East Coast seismic testing, offshore drilling

Following last month’s announcement that the Trump Administration authorized airgun use in waters off the East Coast, Governor Roy Cooper and a group of bipartisan governors urged Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to prohibit harmful seismic testing and offshore drilling in the Atlantic Ocean. “As the governors of states on the Atlantic seaboard, we write >click to read letter< to reiterate our strong opposition to seismic airgun surveys and oil and gas drilling off our coasts,”,, Along with Cooper, the letter was signed by Governor Charlie Baker of Massachusetts; Governor John Carney of Delaware; Governor Andrew Cuomo of New York; Governor Larry Hogan of Maryland; Governor Dannel Malloy of Connecticut; Governor Henry McMaster of South Carolina; Governor Phil Murphy of New Jersey; Governor Ralph Northam of Virginia; and Governor Gina Raimondo of Rhode Island. >click to read<15:44

Nine US States Seek to Stop Atlantic Seismic Testing

Attorneys general from nine U.S. states sued the Trump administration on Thursday to stop future seismic tests for oil and gas deposits off the East Coast, joining a lawsuit from environmentalists concerned the tests harm whales and dolphins. Seismic testing uses air gun blasts to map out what resources lie beneath the ocean. Conservationists say the testing, a precursor to oil drilling, can disorient marine animals that rely on fine-tuned hearing to navigate and find food. The tests lead to beachings of an endangered species, the North Atlantic right whale, they say. >click to read<11:09

This fish is delicious and sustainable, but nobody’s buying

If someone mentions butterfish you may smack your lips, absolutely want to avoid it, or just scratch your head.,,, The confusion is relevant because the real butterfish could appear at a restaurant near you. In 2017 the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration found that Atlantic butterfish “are not overfished and not subject to overfishing.” They’re tasty too. “I love them, they’re absolutely delicious,” said Gregory DiDomenico, executive director of the Garden State Seafood Association. Commercial fishermen have taken note. DiDomenico told NOAA that “people are very much looking forward to getting into this fishery. That means jobs on the boat, jobs at the plant, and fishermen buying more gear.” >click to read<10:33

Watermen: Open Anne Arundel oyster sanctuaries to harvesting

Herring Bay near Deale has eight historic oyster bars, all of them protected from harvesting because the area is an oyster sanctuary. But some commercial watermen say working small sanctuaries like Herring Bay could be better for the oysters, water, and people in the long run. Bill Scerbo, president of the Anne Arundel Watermen’s Association, wants to see sanctuaries like those in county waters reopened to commercial fishing. They say right now oysters in some low-salinity sanctuaries, like Herring Bay, aren’t reproducing naturally. “A lot of oysters have died of old age up here and haven’t been replaced,” the Shady Side resident said. >click to read<10:50

‘Wicked Tuna’ star William ‘Willbilly’ Hathaway dead at 36

“Wicked Tuna” star William “Willbilly” Hathaway died in a car crash Saturday, Fox News has learned. He was 36 years old. Maryland State Police’s Salisbury Barrack confirmed the reality star’s death on Monday. They declined to provide further comment on the case. According to local outlet WBOC16, police responded to a call from a concerned citizen who saw a truck in a ditch. Police told the outlet that Hathaway allegedly called his wife and said someone turned in front of him, forcing him to swerve into a ditch, but that he was uninjured. His wife told authorities she overheard him telling concerned passersby that he was OK. However, authorities found Williams not breathing and slumped over the center console when EMS services arrived. >click to read<16:10

N.J. fishing industry among country’s strongest

The New Jersey fishing industry is among the country’s most robust, generating billions in sales in 2016. That’s according to a report detailing the impact of the commercial and recreational fishing industry released on Thursday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The report, analyzing the industry’s impact by state in 2016, found that nationwide, it generated $212 billion in sales and supported 1.7 million jobs. The commercial industry accounts for the lion’s share of sales at $144 billion. >click to read<10:01

NOAA Fisheries Approves Changes to Longfin Squid Permits and Possession Limits

NOAA Fisheries has approved Amendment 20 to the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan. The measures become effective on March 1, 2019. Specifically, the final rule:
Separates the current longfin/butterfish moratorium permit to create a new butterfish moratorium permit and a separate longfin squid moratorium permit;  Creates a “Tier 1” longfin squid moratorium permit for vessels that landed at least 10,000 lb of longfin squid in any year from 1997-2013; Creates a “Tier 2” longfin squid moratorium permit with a 5,000 lb possession limit fo,,, New longfin squid and butterfish permits will become effective on March 1, 2019 and will be issued by the Regional Administrator as follows:>click to read<13:36

Coast Guard Raises Sunken Fishing Vessel from Shark River Inlet Off Manasquan

The U.S. Coast Guard’s Manasquan Inlet/Shark River station has reported that the Miss Kathleen was successfully raised from the Manasquan Inlet last night and placed on a barge. The removal of the 44-foot commercial fishing boat comes nearly a week after it struck the northern Manasquan Inlet jetty on December 8 and started taking on water, according to the Coast Guard Sector Delaware Bay. >click to read<09:22

Coast Guard monitoring salvage of partially-sunken vessel in Manasquan Inlet, NJ

The Coast Guard is monitoring the salvage of a partially-sunken commercial fishing vessel in Manasquan Inlet, New Jersey, Saturday morning. Watchstanders in the Coast Guard Sector Delaware Bay command center received notification at 2 a.m. that the 44-foot fishing vessel Miss Kathleen allided with the northern Manasquan Inlet jetty and was taking on water with three people and a dog aboard. The Miss Kathleen’s captain intentionally grounded the vessel on Dog Beach, about 20 yards outside the channel. >click to read<16:09

Coast Guard rescues 4 after boat catches fire near Cape May, NJ

The Coast Guard rescued four people from a life raft after a commercial fishing vessel caught fire about 16 miles southeast of Cape May, New Jersey, this morning. Crew members aboard the 75-foot fishing vessel Ocean Pearl activated Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons and abandoned ship after an electrical fire ignited on board around 10:30 a.m. Once aboard their life raft,,,, >click to read<15:12

Always Top Quality! Your Seafreeze Ltd. Price Sheet for December 2018 Has Arrived!

Contact our sales team today @ 401 295 2585 or 800 732 273 For the complete price list from Seafreeze Ltd., >Click here< – We are Direct to the Source-We are Fishermen-We are Seafreeze Ltd! >Click here< to visit our website!10:46

Notorious Menhaden Slayer Reb Raymer Released from Prison

Following two years of incarceration for perpetrating a series of fish kills on the East End, prolific mehaden killer Reb Raymer is back on the streets this week. The Hampton Bays resident, who holds a longstanding grudge against the baitfish, also known as bunker, is responsible for the death of hundreds of thousands of menhaden between June 2015 and November 2016 when he was finally arrested for his crimes. Raymer was convicted of ecoterrorism and cruelty to animals in Hamptons Superior Court early last year,,, >click to read<07:28

More questions than answers emerge from New York wind meeting

A horde of New Bedford fishermen and representatives from the city’s Port Authority shared a train ride down to New York City for a meeting involving an offshore wind project south of Long Island. The Intergovernmental Renewable Energy Task Force meeting was held to discuss a guide the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management released earlier this month outlining potential leasing sites. The day long dialogue, though, may have only introduced more questions rather than provided answers.,,, Another new item from the Port Authority’s perspective involved a presentation by the Department of Defense. It included a diagram that ruled out areas that had previously been listed as “primary” and “secondary” recommendations. >click to read<11:13

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 79′ Master Marine Steel Stern Trawler, CAT 3508, Federal and State permits

Specifications, information and 12 photos >click here< John Deere – 65 KW Genset, Detriot 2-71 – 20 K Genset, This vessel has good towing power as the 59 1/2″ x 63″ propeller turns 400 RPM inside the 60″ nozzle. To see all the boats in this series, >click here<14:25

Montauk lobsterman cuts two tangled bucks free stuck in mating season battle

Anthony Sosinski, 50, a Montauk lobsterman, didn’t hesitate when he saw two bucks tangled in more than a mating season battle last week. Logan Erb, 25, of Montauk, said her pit bull first noticed the two bucks tumbling around her neighbor’s yard Nov. 20. The animals were joined by a piece of deer fencing that only seemed to tighten as they struggled to break free, so Erb ran to Sosinski for help. “He grabbed a knife and just went after them,” said Erb, who was recording the encounter.  Sosinski, co-author of the book, “A Speck in the Sea: A Story of Survival and Rescue,” pursued the two male deer as they wildly twisted. >Video, click to read<19:40