‘Deadliest Catch’ Camera Crew: Inside the gear, skill, physical endurance needed for 30-foot swells, 20 hour days, and shooting at night

For 15 seasons Discovery’s “Deadliest Catch” has been documenting the journey of fishing ships to one of the most remote places in the world, the Bering Sea, to catch king crab and snow crab. In an environment where severe weather and high swells are frequent, it is one of the most difficult and dangerous places imaginable to film. It is also one of the most demanding jobs in all of television, requiring a set of skills not normally asked of a Hollywood camera department. Here’s eight ways the camera team survives the hardest job in television, and still gets astounding images. Video’s, >click to read< 20:02

S.O.S. Howie Carr, New Bedford Needs You – “we need to get a message to Trump.”

Richard Canastra a member of the Massachusetts Governor’s Seaport Advisory Council, the New Bedford Economic Development Council, and the New Bedford Council on Commercial Fishing tells me U.S. Senators Elizabeth Warren and Ed Markey, both Democrats, have done zilch on a range of important issues critical to the industry, from funding of mandatory government monitoring to outdated data used to determine the strength of fishing stocks. Canstra says “we need to get a message to Trump.” Since Warren and Markey are completely ambivalent to the needs of the fishing community and refuse to speak with the president,,, >click to read<  17:41

A disastrous tsunami’s lethal legacy in Newfoundland

On Nov. 18, 1929, fisherman Patrick Rennie watched from higher ground in Lord’s Cove, Nfld., as a barrelling tsunami washed over his home, his wife and their four youngest children within, and pulled it into the harbour. Just over two decades later, in January 1951, Rennie fell victim to whatever combination of diseases had been ravaging his lungs for years—TB, silicosis, cancer—and died at age 60. There is a through line between those two events, hard to discern on the surface but laid bare in haunting prose by Linden MacIntyre in the most evocatively titled book of the year, The Wake: The Deadly Legacy of a Newfoundland Tsunami. >click to read< 13:52

Designs for Stonington Town Dock pier to be presented Aug. 29

The town will present possible designs to protect the south pier of the Town Dock at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 29, at the La Grua Center in the borough. According to the announcement for the event, “community leaders initiated a project to evaluate the condition of the South Pier and develop plans to ensure that this asset is in good repair for the future.” The pier is leased by the Southern New England Fisherman’s & Lobstermen’s Association, who dock their boats there and use its facilities. >click to read<  13:30

Gloucester Fishermen’s Memorial Service Saturday, Aug. 24, 5 PM

Fishermen’s Memorial Service, 5 p.m., procession from the American Legion, down Middle Street and onto Stacy Boulevard led by drummers. Carry flowers or oars in memory of fishermen lost to the sea. All welcome. We will post any updated information as we find it. >click to read< in the Gloucester Daily Times 12:05

August 7, 2016, Fifteen Years Ago Lives Were Lost Aboard The Starbound- My Cousin Joe Marcantonio Speaks Out About The Events Which Took Place That Night>click to read<