Tag Archives: Commercial crab fishing

The Bodega Bay crab industry grew out of food demand during World War II

On a stormy spring day along the Sonoma Coast in 1951, brothers Steve and Bill Smith wove stainless steel wires around the sides of a steel crabpot in preparation for a day of crab catching. By the early 1950s, there were five fishing operations at Bodega Bay and about 100 fishermen who saw commercial crab fishing as a good side hustle, according to news reports at the time. Previously, Smith Brothers Fishery was the sole fishing business on the bay. Crab processing plants also employed women workers through the 1940s and 1950s to pick, weigh and pack Dungeness crabs. 18 photos, >click to read< 11:08

Half Moon Bay fishermen optimistic about Dungeness crab season opening

“I’m a little optimistic. Everyone thinks there is a little more this year than last year, and the weather the next handful of days look really nice,” crab fisherman Scott Edson said. Edson, who will be fishing out of Point Reyes this year with a crew of two on his 36-foot boat, has spent the last few days getting ready for the upcoming crab season the next few months. He has less pressure this season after a great salmon season,,,“I think it’s gonna be better than last year, maybe a little better,” Edson said. Porter McHenry, who fishes out of Pillar Point in Half Moon Bay, agreed. >click to read< 08:50

‘Deadliest Catch’: Here’s How Captain Sig Decides Where To Set Crab Traps

Commercial fishing is sometimes like a game of cat and mouse. The fish obviously move, so you can’t always count on one spot when it comes to setting crab pots out in the Bering Sea. Sig Hansen said there are ways to look for patterns in the fishing migrations. By tracking these things throughout the season, it’s easier for the fishermen to determine where to drop their crabbing pots. The Northwestern captain explains this to >Fishing.net, click to read< in a recent interview about where and how to track the good fishing. >click to read< 19:37

California bans commercial crab fishing due to excessive radiation in seafood? Really?

squirelIn November of last year, California state officials placed an indefinite hold on the commercial crab season, in order to protect public health. The reason given by the state was dangerously high levels of algal toxins in the bodies of the crabs. But according to New York radio station 95.1 FM (SuperStation 95), insiders from the California Fish and Game Commission have revealed that the real reason for the ban was dangerously high levels of radioactivity resulting from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster. I’ve heard it all now! Read the rest here 12:10

Photos:Commercial crab fishing season starts Saturday

While recreational crab fishing started on Nov.1, commercial fisherman at Pillar Point Harbor were busy this week getting boats ready for their season that starts on Saturday.Photos by John Green/Bay Area News Group See the rest here 22:43