Tag Archives: Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972

Gray seal population needs no protection – Mike Rice, South Wellfleet

seals, cape codAccording to the International Union for Conservation of Nature, the giant panda is being taken off the endangered species list and reclassified as vulnerable. A nationwide Chinese census taken in 2014 found 1,864 giant pandas in the wild, up from 1,596 back in 2004. An estimated 40,000-plus gray seals alone call Monomoy Island off Chatham home. That leaves me wondering why the gray seal is still protected under the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972. As the gray seal population in Cape waters continues to boom, drawing more great white sharks to our area every summer, I’m left thinking the tourist industry here may soon join the fishing industry, and be classified as vulnerable, too. It’s time to de-list the gray seal from the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972. Link 08:49

Killing to Conserve – Is it effective, or ethical, to cull one protected species to help another?

cormorantFrom a population reduced to about 10,000 in the 1950s, California sea lion numbers have grown to nearly 390,000 since they were protected under the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972, which made it illegal to kill, or “take,” them without a permit. While most of the animals wintering on the Oregon coast stick to offshore habitat, bays, and estuaries, since 2000 a small number of sea lions, 100 or so, have been swimming 145 miles up the Columbia River, from its mouth at Astoria to Bonneville Dam, to eat upstream migrating salmon that stack up at the base of the dam and fish ladders. Some of the fish they devour are upriver spring Chinook salmon, which are listed as endangered under the Read the article here 11:25

Unintended Consequences – Protecting wild predators can lead to problems

Seals ripping head offThat is, a recovering predator population can increase competition with humans for the same prey; it can start eating individuals of a protected prey species; or it can pit multiple predator populations in competition for the same limited prey. Or it can do all three. In the northeastern Pacific Ocean, for example, commercial harvests of king salmon have declined from historic levels, in part to protect declining wild-salmon populations, seven of which have Endangered Species Act protection. Meanwhile, the ecosystem’s seals and sea lions, which were once killed commercially, are now protected by the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972. Read the rest here 20:48

Sea Shepherd attorneys to attend Makah whaling meeting next Wednesday in Port Angeles

A legal team from the Sea Shepherd Screwball Society will be among the activists at a public meeting Wednesday, April 29 who’ll oppose the Makah tribe’s campaign to resume whaling. The Owens head Peninsula Citizens for the Protection of Whales. They argue that the federal Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 is “the whales’ treaty with the government.” It bans the killing of whales. For their part, the Makah argue that they reserved the right to hunt whales and seals when they signed the . Read the rest here   15:11