Tag Archives: Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association

Hurricane Irma cuts Florida lobster harvest by half

A fresh catch of spiny lobster arrives dockside. But for marina owner Gary Graves, this delivery is too little, too late. “Basically, lobster fishing is pretty much over for us this year,”said Graves, who is vice president of Keys Fisheries wholesaler. Graves says Hurricane Irma dealt a severe blow when it hit Florida in September. Leaving a trail of wreckage on land, the storm also came just a month into lobster harvesting season. “We’re going to probably end up maybe 50 percent of a normal season the way it looks right now,” he said. click here to read the story 11:19

Florida Keys seafood industry begins gear recovery after Hurricane Irma

To find the lobster, Florida Keys commercial fishers must first track down gear scattered or destroyed by Hurricane Irma. “Just like on shore, the underwater has patterns of destruction,” Bill Kelly, executive director of the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association, said Thursday. “Some areas have suffered major devastation, really hard hit,” he said. “Other areas are not so bad.” One large Middle Keys family operation estimates having lost 6,000 traps, Kelly said. click here to read the story 11:00

Florida Keys commercial lobster fleet prepares for Saturday’s opening

lobster-fireworks-Aug3Hopes are high for high prices and calm seas as the Florida Keys commercial lobster fleet prepares for Saturday’s opening of the regular crawfish season. “Based on the level of [juvenile lobster] recruitment we’ve seen, we expect another outstanding season,” Bill Kelly, executive director of the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association, said Tuesday. Last year, Key commercial lobster trappers and divers collected about 5.2 million pounds of lobster, which accounts for 90 percent of Florida’s statewide lobster harvest. “Lobster is the largest [commercial fishing] cash crop in the Keys, and the largest in the state of Florida,” Kelly said. “Every season, our biggest issue facing lobster and stone-crab trap fishermen is tropical storms and hurricanes that displace and destroy gear and disrupt the normal migratory pattern of lobster,” Kelly said. “We’ve been pretty fortunate since Hurricane Wilma in 2005.” Read the story here 07:55

Seminar in Marathon Fla. looks at spiny lobster research

Spiny lobsterSome top experts on spiny lobster will meet Wednesday in Marathon to discuss the latest research on the crustacean, which is the top-grossing marine species in the Florida Keys generating $70 million a year to the local economy. The Keys waters account for nearly 90 percent of the spiny lobster harvest in the United States. A robust Asian market and a steady catch has made spiny lobster fishery the most lucrative in the Keys. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is hosting the all-day seminar Wednesday as a way to put out the latest research on spiny lobster to the local commercial fishermen and to the public, FWC lobster biologist Tom Matthews said. Bill Kelly, the executive director of the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association, said there is a need for new science on the fishery, as the current science used to make regulations is “outdated and goes back to the 1990s.” Read the story here 11:57

Congressional bills aim to kill Biscayne National Park’s protected no-fishing zone

A planned no-fishing zone in Biscayne National Park could be undone by Congress. U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.) this week filed a Senate bill called the Preserving Public Access to Public Waters Act that puts the 16-square-mile Biscayne marine reserve in its crosshairs. Sport and commercial fishing organizations, including the CCA and the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association, protested the reserve as excessive and endorsed the congressional bills intended to remove it. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission objected to closing a reef-fishing area accessible to the large South Florida boating community. Read the rest here 14:36

Lobster, crabs, shrimp and more are served up in this weekend’s Key West Seafood Festival

Florida Keys commercial fishermen and fans of fresh fish and seafood gather Jan. 16 and 17 to celebrate the island chain’s bountiful ocean harvest during the 11th annual Florida Keys Seafood Festival.Presented by the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association, the family-friendly feast is set for 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. the first day and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. the second at Key West’s Bayview Park at Truman Avenue and Jose Marti Drive. The menu features fresh grilled Florida spiny lobster, pick-and-peel Key West pink shrimp, stone crab claws, fried local fish,,, Read the rest here 10:55

New rules for dolphin proposed

A federal fishery council has approved a rule that could keep the open so that by the time the migrating fish makes its way to the Florida Keys, the commercial fishery will not be closed. The National Marine Fisheries Service closed down the commercial dolphin fishery in July, the height of dolphin fishing in the Keys. For the past two years, fishermen off North and South Carolina, who generally fish for tuna, have targeted dolphin heavily and the annual commercial allocation has been near run out by the time Keys fishermen start fishing for dolphin. Read the article here 15:15

Florida Keys commercial fishermen critical of proposed dolphin changes

The head of the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association contends that a proposed increase to the dolphin fish allocation to the commercial fishing sector does not go far enough. Kelly proposed federal fishery managers increase the commercial catch in 5, 10 or 20 percent increases a year, depending on how much the recreational side of the fishery harvests the previous year, he said. The South Atlantic and could look at the harvest data each year and make adjustments. Read the rest here 08:17

Keys commercial fishermen hurting from mahi mahi limit

Florida Keys commercial fishermen last week renewed their appeal to federal fishery managers to allow more harvests. The commercial fishery for dolphin, an offshore fish also known as mahi mahi, closed June 30 when the annual catch limit of 1.57 million pounds was reached. The South Atlantic Fishery Management Council met all last week in South Carolina. Kelly traveled up to testify. “They’re leaving millions of pounds of a highly sustainable fishery on the table,” said Bill Kelly, director of the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association. Read the rest here 10:49

New rules, no-fishing zone for Biscayne National Park

Commercial fishermen worry that restrictions will place pressure on other areas, particularly the Keys, said Bill Kelly, executive director of the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association.  That plan, which proposes banning commercial fishing as well as increased limits on catch size and number,,, The state of Florida opposes the ban on commercial fishing in that proposal. Read the rest here 13:45

Stone-crab harvest looks healthy, prices booming

stone crab season, kevin wadlowFishermen are still pulling traps in the final two weeks of stone-crab season, but early indications suggest a step toward a return to normal harvests. “Late-season production has stepped up which could bring us close to a number in the range of a normal season,” Bill Kelly, executive director of the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association, said Tuesday. Stone-crab season opens Oct. 15 and closes May 15. Last season’s commercial harvest of a reported 1.9 million pounds of claws (the only part of stone crabs harvested),,, Read the rest here 14:41

Fishermen OK with colder weather on way, as Mother Nature chills the Keys

Commercial fishermen are one group of locals who welcome the cooler, breezy weather. “A little weather is always welcome to get fish, especially spiny lobster, stone crabs and mutton snapper, moving and feeding,” said Bill Kelly, executive director of the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association. “This type of weather moves fish like mutton snapper out of the back country and over to the ocean side, where they aggregate on patch reefs and along the reef line.” Read the rest here 14:32

Key West: Lobster traps limits not well received

The idea of reducing the number of spiny lobster traps as a way to ease fishing pressure on the Florida Keys’ most lucrative commercial fishery did not go over well at a meeting of state federal fishery managers Monday in Key West. The group discussed three possible actions: closing the season early; embarking on a more aggressive trap reduction program; and exempting the spiny lobster fishery from annual quotas. The proposal that received the most vocal opposition was more aggressively reducing the number of traps. Read the rest here 08:09

Dock to Dish Opens Florida’s First Community Supported Fishery

docktodishDock to Dish, the first community and restaurant supported fishery program anchored in Montauk, announced last week it would open Florida’s first ever Community Supported Fishery (CSF) in Key West in February of this year. The program is being developed in conjunction with Key West restaurateur Chris Holland and the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association. Read the rest here 14:00

Fishermen want larger limit for mackerel – Council wants Catch Shares as a condition

In order to get the increase in trip limits, the fishermen may have to go along with a fishery management practice they have long opposed — catch shares. The Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association has staunchly opposed catch shares, arguing they are running smaller mom-and-pop fishermen out of business and giving greater allocations to large commercial fleets. They also create a market for people selling their allocations to the highest bidder. Read the rest here 09:03

FWC biologists: Lobster casitas too problematic

“We’re done,” said marine salver John Coffin, who has worked with other commercial divers to legalize casitas. “I really feel betrayed by (FWC) staff. The biology is good. They didn’t want the headaches. Nobody wants the headaches. …  Read the rest here 08:30

Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association lost two of its biggest advocates in Tuesday’s elections

U.S. Reps. Joe Garcia, D-Key West, and Steve Southerland, R-Panama City, were both voted out of office. They were big supporters of the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association and helped the group on many fishing issues, Executive Director Bill Kelly said. Read the rest here 07:33

Stone-crab season starts Wednesday

When it comes to claws, there could be cause for cheer: Stone-crab season opens Wednesday, with commercial fishermen seeking the legal-size claws that rank as Monroe County’s most lucrative harvest after spiny lobster. “No one ever knows for sure until the first pull of the season, but we do have some things that are looking good,” Bill Kelly, executive director of the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association, said Friday. Read the rest here 17:46

New rules would ban commercial fishing, lobster mini season from Biscayne National Park

“It’s always so easy to take a swipe at fishermen whether they’re commercial or recreational,” said Bill Kelly, executive director of the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association. “It’s going to have a severe socio-economic impact. We’re talking generations of fishermen — a cultural heritage.” Read more here  08:55

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2014/06/16/4182824/new-rules-would-ban-commercial.html#storylink=cpy

National Park Service Biscayne Park Fishery Management Plan ruffles fishermen

The head of the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association says he’ll take the fight to Congress if need be to fend off the implementation of a series of fishing restrictions proposed this week by Biscayne National Park officials. Read more here  08:12

Florida Law imposing stiffer penalties for lobster violators goes to governor

Lobster violations have generally been treated as second-degree misdemeanors punishable by up to 60 days in jail and a $500 fine. Under the revised law, possession of any out-of-season lobster or wrung tails, or violations involving more than 25 lobster, would be considered a first-degree misdemeanor. A first-degree misdemeanor could result in a 12-month jail sentence and $1,000 fine. Loss of recreational or commercial fishing licenses also could result. Read more here  08:22

Ghost traps major problem in the Keys – Bill Kelly says there would be a lot of fishermen out of business

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) fisheries biologist Tom Matthews and other scientists found that 85,000 spiny lobster ghost traps which have lost their buoys, and more than 1 million pieces of traps and fishing gear junk,, Bill Kelly, executive director of the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association, contends the trap loss estimates are too high.  Read more here keysnews.com 06:58

New Biscayne National Park management plan gets cold reception – All commercial fishing, except using lampara nets for ballyhoo, would be banned.

“It’s crazy,” said Ernie Piton, president of the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association. “They’re closing so many areas, where are people going to go? They’ll be on top of each other.” “This would affect so many jobs, here and in Miami,” Piton said. “I haven’t seen anything to justify it.” [email protected] 22:05

Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association awarded $5,000 in scholarships

This year the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association awarded $5,000 in scholarships from Key Largo to Key West. Proceeds were raised from the Florida Keys Seafood Festival in January and sales of the cookbook “Ocean Flavors and More.”Five students received $1,000 each, including Catherine Guninovart of Coral Shores High School, Ariel Jesus Rodriguez and Sean Roussin of Marathon Middle High School, and Kayla Geide and William DeSantis Jr. of Key West High School.

Bill Kelly, Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association, to lobby against annual catch limits at “Managing Our Nation’s Fisheries” Conference

keysnews.com – “I’m going to address annual catch limits, and their effects on the commercial fishing industry,” Kelly said. “We want to make sure fishery management is based on sound science.” continued

Feds reverse, keep commercial yellowtail harvest open

Hopefully, these extra fish will be enough to keep everybody working,” Roy Crabtree, regional administrator for the National Marine Fisheries Service’s Southeast Region, said Tuesday. http://www.keysnet.com/2012/11/07/483126/feds-reverse-keep-commercial-yellowtail.html