Tag Archives: Maine’s lobster industry

Maine’s lobster industry needs your help

A little over a week ago, we saw more than a thousand lobstermen flood the Stonington commercial pier. Almost the entire Maine delegation attended in person to demonstrate its support for lobstermen who are being unfairly targeted around the issue of right whale entanglement. Also speaking and demonstrating their support were Maine Governor Janet Mills, State Senate President Troy Jackson and several other state elected officials. by Julie Eaton >click to read< 12:10

The Feds Are About To Kill Maine’s Lobster Industry And Hurt Thousands Of Workers For Some Bogus Whale Regulation

Big government overreach knows no bounds. The latest example of federal regulation that will threaten thousands of jobs and livelihoods of hardworking Americas comes from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The NOAA says that Maine’s lobster industry is to blame for the killing of right whales, an endangered species, and has enacted regulations set to take place this September which will harm the already struggling industry. Yet, the evidence says that the proposed regulation will in no way actually help the whales and will instead only burden lobstermen. >click to read< 17:30

Notice from Commissioner Keliher: Update on Federal Whale Rules

As many of you know, the National Marine Fisheries Service’s Atlantic Large Whale Take Reduction Team (TRT) met last week and recommended broad measures that included a target to remove 50 percent of endlines from the Gulf of Maine. The remaining endlines will also need to be made safer so that, if a whale does come in contact with a line, the rope will break. The outcome for Maine’s lobster industry could have been far worse. Many TRT participants did push for a phase-in of ropeless fishing over five or ten years, large scale closed areas (including two in Maine), and weak rope across the entire fishery. In the end, Maine delegates were successful in pushing back on those proposals,,, Click to read<10:12

Book questions Maine lobster fishery’s future

Author Christopher White will explore Maine’s lobster industry at an author talk and book signing for “The Last Lobster: Boom or Bust for Maine’s Greatest Fishery?” at the Jesup Memorial Library on Thursday, June 21, at 7 p.m. In the last five years, Maine lobstermen have annually caught more than 120 million pounds, six times what was caught annually in the 1980s.,,, Over the course of a year, White followed three lobster captains — Frank, Jason and Julie — as they hauled and set thousands of traps off the coast of Stonington and fought a warming ocean, volatile prices and rough weather to keep their livelihood afloat. >click to read< 11:39

Maine’s Lobster Ladies Officially Kick Ass

Early mornings, heavy traps, rough seas, and scary lobsters. These are just a few of the things that don’t intimidate the women working in Maine’s lobster industry. It’s a tough job, and not only because it requires being awake and on a boat at 5 a.m. It also means being surrounded by a lot of dudes. The expectation of masculinity is built into the language of the trade. Even female boat workers refer to themselves as sternmen, and fishing boats with names like “centerfold,” and “moneyshot” fill the harbor. Video, >click to read<13:31

Low numbers of endangered whales raise question about lobster industry impacts

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution scientist Mark Baumgartner said that to help the whales survive much longer, the ropes Maine lobstermen use to tend their traps have to be modified or even eliminated. And it’s not just for the whales’ sake. “I feel the industry is in jeopardy,” Baumgartner said.,,, Last month the Conservation Law Foundation’s Portland office filed a federal lawsuit against the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for violating the Endangered Species Act. >click to read< 12:10

Our View: Time for Maine to look past lobster boom years

There is an economic principle that’s usually attributed to Herbert Stein, who worked for the Nixon administration and The Wall Street Journal. Stein’s law: If something can’t keep going forever, it won’t. Maine’s lobster industry is near the peak of a historic boom, making it the state’s most lucrative fishery. In the last 30 years, lobster landings have increased from 20 million pounds a year to 130 million. No one expects the catch to keep growing forever. The question is not whether it will decline, but when. >click to read< 13:57

Gulf of Maine had cool year in 2017, but is still warming – >click to read<

Scientists expect some decline in Gulf of Maine lobster numbers, but ‘no calamity’

Concern about the effects of climate change have reached Maine’s lobster industry, where there are questions whether the state’s record lobster catches can be sustained. There has been wide agreement among fishermen and scientists in recent years that the waters of the Gulf of Maine have been getting steadily warmer as a result of the changing climate. In fact, researchers say the Gulf water have warmed more quickly than most other parts of the ocean. University of Maine researcher Dr. Rick Wahle said warmer water in the Gulf has been one factor in the big jump in lobster landings. He said a reduction in the number of lobster predators and conservation efforts by fishermen are also factors. click here to read the story 14:53

Limited entry for Maine lobster fishery debated

lobsterDM0811_468x521There’s another battle brewing in Maine’s lobster industry, but this is one that likely will be fought in the Legislature rather than on the water. Out to about 12 miles offshore, Maine waters are divided from east to west into seven Lobster Management Zones. Lobstermen are required to declare which of the zones they will fish in based, generally, on where they live. Six of those zones have waiting lists established under the state’s “limited entry” law. People on the list have completed a state-mandated and want a license to fish,,, Read the rest here 11:30

Lobstermen play waiting game while early prices spike, And wait they must!

lobsterDM0811_468x521Maine’s lobster industry is gearing up for another big year as the state’s 4,500 commercial fishermen wait for lobsters to migrate to the coast and shed the hard shells they’ve been carrying all winter.  “The old saying is: ‘The weather gets better before the lobster catch does,’” he said. “It takes awhile for the water temperatures to warm up and for the lobsters to do their thing.” It all comes down to weather – not this weekend’s mostly sunny summer skies but the bitter cold of last winter that chilled the Gulf of Maine. Then a wave of storms in February mixed up the water column and drove those low temperatures at the surface down to lobster habitat at the bottom. Read the rest here

Good lobster year helps boat builders – Video

People who work in Maine’s lobster industry have been celebrating after what many say was a good year. The higher incomes mean that after a number of slow years for boat builders, fishermen are once again buying new boats. At Holland’s Boat Shop in Belfast, they said several new boats have already gone out the door and others are under construction. Video, Read the rest here 10:15

Maine’s lobster industry feeling pain of slow start – Some say the crustaceans are ‘back on the old time clock’

David Cousins, president of the Maine Lobstermen’s Association and a South Thomaston lobsterman, said lobstermen expect shedding to pick up and catches to escalate at the end of this month, if not the end of the week. He said the slow season indicates that Maine lobster are “back on the old time clock” of shedding later in the summer. Read more here 09:13

Lobster forecast causes concern, not panic, for Maine’s industry

Maine’s lobster industry, the state’s most lucrative fishery, may foresee shrinking harvests and higher market prices, but such changes are likely several years away, lobstermen and dealers said Wednesday. portlandpress  Read more here  11:09

Maine’s lobster industry might not last forever. Then what?

As marine experts and fishermen made clear at the Maine Fishermen’s Forum in Rockport recently, the ocean is changing and, with it, the coastal economy. Given the importance of fishing in Maine, particularly the lobster industry, the state needs to learn more not just about how increasing water temperatures Read more here  14:25