Tag Archives: restoration

Restoring history – 36-foot U.S. Coast Guard Motor Lifeboat CG36391

When Glen Cathers’ wife Naomi asked him what he would choose if he could have anything in the world, he replied, “I want a motor lifeboat.” “Let’s do it,” she said. A month later, they found CG36391 in Astoria, a 36-foot lifeboat built in 1934. It was “in major disrepair,” hardly recognizable. “I could see that bull nose on it, I knew right then what it was. It was the real deal.” They purchased it and began what would become a seven-year process of restoration. “It’s new from the waterline up,” he said of the boat as it floated tied up to the visitor dock at The Dalles Marina. It contains parts from 11 different boats. “Piece by piece, I collected all the parts we needed,” he said. The restoration was completed in 2012. Today the boat looks as it did in 1939. “A little more varnish maybe,” Cathers chuckled. “That was the first thing the crews did, get rid of the varnish.” Read the story here 11:46

Fundraiser! Restoration of the F/V Easy Lady

The F/V Easy Lady has been a part of Shem Creek for decades. She is a wooden crab boat with lots of history.  She is the only remaining wooden crab boat in the Creek. Follow the story of the Easy Lady.  Be a part of the craftsmens hands as she  is returned to her beautiful scantlings by friends with genuine concern. Join the craftsmen, crew, and Captain in sending the Easy Lady back to Shem Creek as a powerful, working symbol of why the Creek should be preserved. The Easy Lady has a long  way to go.  With work already  in progress, and by working together, she will become the lady we all want her to be. Click here to donate F/V Easy Lady on face book 16:34

The Easy Lady restoration almost complete – Lowcountry treasure ready to return to her berth

EP-151129875.jpg&Maxw=600&Q=90The Easy Lady has belonged solely to Cpt. Kenneth Ezell for 10 years. But after a public appeal went out to help the captain restore this commercial crabbing boat and save her from sinking, she’s almost as a good as new from keel to chine. More importantly, Ezell, who is forever grateful, considers himself only as her caretaker now. “She now belongs to Mount Pleasant and her citizens,” he said. The Easy Lady is now part of the whole of Mount Pleasant, he explained. He considers her the crown jewel of his career, which is about to take another turn. Read the article here  F/V Easy Lady on face book 11:12

Last West Coast lumber schooner nears final steps to 13-year restoration

ca thayer restoration san fransiscoExactly 120 years ago a Danish man living near Eureka built the schooner C.A. Thayer, one of hundreds of ships used to fuel the growth of California’s cities by delivering lumber from the vast forests of the Northwest. After being out of use for nearly 60 years the Thayer — the last of its kind — is now making a comeback to prepare it for sailing again on the San Francisco Bay. In the next to last phase of its $14 million-plus restoration, the Thayer was towed Thursday from its national maritime park dock in San Francisco to an Alameda ship yard for installation of,,, Read the rest here 10:06

The Easy Lady – Restoring the wooden boat from keel to chine and one plank above

Easy Lady is in need of repairs to return the ship to its former gloryMore often than not, the sentimental and historical value of something is more than the sum of its parts. Such is the case of The Easy Lady, a well-known commercial fishing boat in Shem Creek. She’s owned by Captain Kenneth Ezell who considers her the crown jewel of his career. The Easy Lady has a hydraulic pot hauler and is designed to catch 100 bushels of crabs a day to be delivered to local picking houses. The ship can also be converted to a shrimp boat in under 45 minutes. There is nothing else like it on Shem Creek. Read the rest here 16:32

The George W. Collier, a 115-year-old oyster fishing skipjack finally getting new life

skipjack restorationFor a decade, the skipjack George W. Collier lay at the end of a long road in Cape Charles, literally and figuratively. The 72-foot-long boat was built in Maryland in 1900 and was once used as an oyster fishing vessel, able to easily navigate shallow waters. But when engine-powered boats replaced skipjacks, the George W. Collier was left on a mud bank. Fewer than 30 of the traditional boats remain today. On Thursday, the skipjack was finally sent to a shipyard, on its way to being restored in its birthplace on Deal Island in Maryland. 8 photos, Read the rest here 11:25

Schooner Ernestina Morrissey departs New Bedford for restoration at Boothbay Harbor Shipyard in Maine

ernestina headed for overhaulThe small flags atop the Ernestina-Morrissey’s masts whipped in the wind, as the schooner made its way out of the harbor, tugged by the Jaguar early Sunday morning.  “It’s a good omen that it’s one of the most beautiful day of spring that she leaves the harbor to be restored,”  Anne Louro said. “It’s a great new chapter for a boat who has had many chapters.” The restoration is expected to cost about $6 million, Pires-Hester said, and the funds are coming from a variety of sources. Read the rest here 11:40