Tag Archives: Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission

Dungeness Crab season is going strong on Oregon Coast

The commercial Dungeness crab season has been underway for about four months. About 11 million pounds of crab have been off-loaded so far. The Dungeness Crab Commission says season yields go up and down each year. This year is expected to be a down year, but the commission doesn’t expect to see too steep a drop in the overall catch. >click to read< 09:10

Dungeness Crab Season opens Dec.16th From Cape Falcon to the California border!

Fishing vessels can start setting gear for the pre-soak period as soon as Dec. 13 and see their first pulls hit the docks on opening day. The season is normally scheduled to open Dec. 1, but is often delayed for quality assurance reasons and toxin testing. Testing this year showed a low meat yield in crab specimens, prompting the two-week delay to allow the crabs to fill with meat. Last year’s opening day was delayed until Dec. 31 for similar reasons. Domoic acid levels in crab across the coast were found to be safe for human consumption,,, >click to read< 12:55

Crab industry, Oregon continue plans to avoid whale entanglement

New regulations for commercial Dungeness crab fishermen in Oregon aim to get boats on the water earlier in the season and reduce the amount of gear to avoid tangling with endangered whales. “Our fleet is made up of 400 individual businesspeople who each bring a different perspective to the issue,” said Hugh Link, the executive director of the Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission. “For over three years, they have been given the opportunity to weigh in on how best to mitigate the whale entanglement risk,” he continued. “But it is an ongoing process. These upcoming meetings are the next important step and we hope they take the opportunity to have their voices heard.”

‘Okay, so what do we do?’ – New Markets Reshape Crab Industry

“China shutting down was when we first started to feel the impact of the (coronavirus) pandemic, then the closures of restaurants and stores hit us full blast,” says Novotny. “All of a sudden nothing was going out.” “But necessity is the mother of invention. Everyone from the crabbers to the processors to the mom-and-pop places started saying, ‘Okay, so what do we do?’ and you started to see Pacific Seafood start shipping crab all over the country.” Until the pandemic, flash-freezing techniques, which freeze crabs in a briny block of ice to maintain flavor and texture, was a niche market, used primarily for small orders. >click to read< 10:37

Dungeness fleet back off Oregon Coast

Crabbing restrictions were lifted Friday along the South Coast after biotoxin levels in Dungeness were found to be safe again, reinviting the region’s commercial fleet to take full advantage of what is now the second-best Oregon crabbing season on record. Oregon Department of Agriculture tests Friday showed domoic acid levels in Dungeness were back into the safe margins for the second consecutive week, allowing sport crabbers back to the ocean and bays that have been off-limits since May 10. >click to read<19:53

Second delay idles Newport crab fleet

The commercial Dungeness crab season has been pushed back — again — this time to at least Dec. 31 as fishery managers wait for pockets of light crab to come up to par. While some crab need more time to reach the meat content target of 25 percent, the wait has disappointed Newport fishermen who question extending delay when so much of the product is ready to be brought to the docks. Crab from Coos Bay north appear ready for harvest. Tests conducted Dec. 6-9 showed Newport crab at 26 percent meat content,,, Newport fisherman Corey Rock called the delay another example of a limited number of fishermen dictating the terms of the season to the larger fleet. >click to read<09:17

Crab season delayed again in Oregon – Crabbers on hold until at least Dec. 31

Oregon’s Dungeness crab fishery will not open until at least Dec. 31 after testing by state fishery managers revealed crabs are still too low in meat yield in some areas of the coast. The valuable commercial fishery traditionally opens on Dec. 1. In November, fishery managers announced the season would be delayed until mid-December because crabs were not plump enough. The most recent delay is not a big surprise, said Tim Novotny, the spokesman for the Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission, which advocates for the industry. “It was completely justified,” said John Corbin, a commercial fishermen in Clatsop County and chairman of the crab commission. >click to read<19:38

Nonprofit would bring sea otters back to Oregon. Commercial fishing industry isn’t so sure

“For about 110 years now, there’s been a big hole in our environment,” said Peter Hatch, a Siletz tribal member living in Corvallis.,, Hatch recently joined the board of a new nonprofit dedicated to bringing the sea otter back to Oregon waters. The group is named the Elakha Alliance,,, But excitement is not the unanimous response. “The notion of full-scale reintroduction of otters makes me feel very apprehensive because we don’t know how that will affect commercial fisheries,” said Newport crabber Bob Eder. Eder’s concerned that reintroduction could change his industry. >click to read<20:33

Oregon Crabber: ‘We’ll wait for a better price instead of going out fishing for less of a price’

Local crabbers are once again bracing for a problem they know all too well. The start of the commercial Dungeness crab season is being delayed until December 16 – at the earliest.,, Jeff Sober, a crabber of almost 40 years, said it happens frequently. He is always ready by December – but saves money just case. “We’re just going to be delayed. The season will happen eventually,” he said. “We do have a Christmas market. If we miss out on that, we’ll probably miss out on some money.” >click to read<19:38

Coast Guard will help researchers track whales along the West Coast

The Oregon crab industry is putting up money to launch a new research study on where whales swim and feed along the Pacific Coast. The study stems from growing concern West Coast-wide about whales getting tangled in fishing gear. The Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission voted unanimously Tuesday to underwrite the first year of a three-year aerial survey of humpbacks, gray whales and blue whales off the coast. Oregon State University researcher Leigh Torres said the Marine Mammal Institute, which she leads, and the state Department of Fish and Wildlife hope to win a federal grant to cover years two and three. >click to read<22:57

‘There Aren’t A Lot Of Other Options’: Port Orford’s Season Of Crab And Crisis

Oregon’s 2018 toxic algae troubles didn’t begin with the summer bloom tainting Salem’s water supply. The opening salvo actually came from the wintry Pacific, where high levels of domoic acid — a neurotoxin byproduct of marine algae blooms — disrupted seafood production along Oregon’s South Coast. For Port Orford in particular, where the fishing industry sustains about one-third of the local economy, this meant a season of loss instead of bounty. By the numbers, Port Orford really can’t afford more economic distress. >click to read<10:58

Crab season: ‘Fishermen just needed to go fishing’ while skinny crab adds stress

The opening of the commercial crab season is traditionally December 1, but this year it was delayed to ensure quality and to work out negotiations between fishermen and processors over price.
While crabbers in Newport agreed to a $2.75 starting price, we were told Friday the offer was not accepted by the majority of west coast fishermen. >click here to read< 16:54

Skinny crabs add stress on local business owners – Scattered crabbing vessels dotted the horizon from Klipsan Beach and along the southwestern Washington coast last Monday. It was the start of the new commercial crabbing season — and possibly, sellers hope, the rebounding of the local market. Pacific Northwest crabbers have already lost over one and a half months’ worth of the crab season. >click here to read<

Price talks delay Dungeness crab season

Crab boats loaded with pots sat at the docks all weekend while fishermen and processors remained in a gridlock over prices. The commercial Dungeness crab season was set to open Monday in most of Oregon and Washington state, but price negotiations and ocean conditions are keeping boats at home.,,, At one point major processors had offered crabbers $2.30 a pound — not nearly enough to convince them to go out, local crabbers said. >click here to read< 14:12

A Dungeness Dinner – Three recipes that dare to be different!

Oregon’s most valuable seafood is centerpiece of a recent dining experience that’s so easy, anyone can prepare a Dungeness dinner. Last month, we showed you how the Dungeness crab harvest was red hot and rolling as Oregon’s most valuable seafood. Fishermen visited a school to share the good news about seafood that’s worth more than $150 million to the Oregon economy. The program is called “Boat to School” and allows youngsters to learn from Oregon fishermen where seafood comes from – it was an entertaining and informative session, but as it turned out, it was only part of the story. The Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission wants consumers to try recipes that are simple, quick and delicious. Fisherman Steve Fick loves to share that good news with three recipes that dare to be different. Watch the video, view the photo gallery, and copy these three recipes! 12:36

Oregon and Washington – Crab quality, quantity, prices all good

AR-160109962.jpg&MaxW=600It’s only a few days into this year’s commercial Dungeness crab season and fishermen already believe they are looking at a better run than last year. Dan Ayres, coastal shellfish manager with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, won’t have initial landing numbers for another week or so but, he said, “The word we’re getting from the fleet is that it looks better than last year.” After getting the all-clear from state health departments,  commercial Dungeness crab fishermen finally hit the water Jan. 4 after being delayed for weeks due to elevated levels of the marine toxin domoic acid. Read the article here 19:04

Adding Insult to Injury of a Late Start, Coast Guard keeps watch over crab fleet

EP-160109937.jpg&MaxW=600Wildlife officers got a bird’s eye view of the commercial Dungeness crab fishery opening, courtesy of the U.S. Coast Guard. The C-130 Hercules motored north along the Washington state coastline in the wee hours of a frigid New Year’s Day.  The plane turned off all but its navigation lights to be stealthier. “It looks like the gear is all on board,” she says, marking another vessel, stacked high with crab pots, as non-suspicious before quickly moving onto the next. Read the article here 16:08

Fishermen ready for crab season

crab%20boatFishermen admit the delay is inconvenient, and came at an inopportune time, but are realistic about the delay, and know it’s just part of the industry. “It’s nothing new to us,” said Brett Webb, a Port Orford port commissioner and fisherman. “Anyone who doesn’t expect a delay should probably reconsider their expectations.” Bernie Lindley, a Brookings-Harbor fisherman, said the season may still prove to be a difficult one for fishermen on the south coast, as much of the crab is expected to be up in the Coos Bay area. Read the article here 22:23

Breaking News – Disastrous Start to Oregon Dungeness Crab Fishery – But is it Really?

Yesterday morning we were told that the Oregon Dungeness Crab season was off to a near disastrous start. The “derby” style fishery opened on December 1st with dismal returns so far. We interview Hugh Link the Executive Director of the  to get some insight into the Oregon Dungeness Crab Fishery. Watch the video here 19:21

The Oregon Dungeness commercial crab fishing season started on time this year

“It’s been delayed the last two years, but this year we’ve got a Dec. 1 opener,” Hugh Link said last week. Link, the executive director of the Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission, said the opening is set by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and is based, up and down the coast, on the percentage of fill rate of the crab. Full story here 17:35

Coos Bay, Ore: Commercial Dungeness crab season ends this week – Numbers Down, Value up

The commercial Dungeness crab fishing season officially closes at midnight on Thursday, but the numbers are not likely to change much at this point. Hugh Link, executive director of the Oregon Dungeness crab commission, says it is proving to be a unique season, and that is a very good thing. Read more here 22:33

“The crab are out there, but you have to work this year. This year, experience is going to pay,” – The Coos Bay World: Expect Great Crab, OK Season

A commercial crab fishing season that was delayed for two weeks is drawing mixed reviews in the opening days. The quality of crab is great, experts say, but for fishermen and processors the season may be just average. [email protected]  19:30

Landing a brand – In a decade, Oregon seafood haul has been worth a billion dollars

COOS BAY-The Oregon Dungeness Crab fishery plopped tens of millions of dollars on the Oregon coast this year. In a fishery known for its up and down nature, it has contributed enormously to the state’s economy over the past decade. Hugh Link, Executive Director of the Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission, recently returned from an economic summit where he touted some staggering numbers. [email protected] 09:40

Oregon crabbers struggle despite large harvest

CHARLESTON — Three months in, feedback on the Oregon commercial Dungeness crab season is mixed. “Maybe it was a big-boat season,”’ Reeves said. “The big boats got ’em while little operations like my own starve to death.” Reeves said harvest numbers can be deceptive representations of actual commercial success. For one thing, fishermen just aren’t getting the prices they’re used to. continued