28 accidents reported since crab season began off Oregon, Washington

Since the commercial Dungeness crab season began on January 15th, Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Portland marine investigators have responded to 28 marine accidents involving commercial fishing vessels, with no reported deaths or serious injuries. Since the start of the season, Marine Safety Unit Portland personnel responded to an average of one marine accident per day, causalities included loss of propulsion, loss of steering, loss of power, fire, collisions, grounding and personnel injuries. >click to read< 17:13

GARFO AA Pentony taking on whale crisis – Lobstermen wary of more environmental regulations

South Shore Lobstermen wary – Traps dropped to the bottom of the ocean by lobstermen are currently connected to a buoy at the surface by a long, taut rope. Fishermen use the buoys to mark where traps are and use the rope to pull up them from the ocean floor, but researchers think the same thing could be achieved by ditching the ropes and using a GPS-like tracking technology and acoustic communication. >click to read< 16:20

Pentony taking on whale crisis – The number one issue right now is the right whale crisis,,, It will occupy our resources and energy for the next several years until we can reverse the trend. Thats going to be a significant challenge. >click to read<

F/V Alaska Patriot sunk, now Coast Guard seeks fines

The Alaska Patriot rests in a watery grave after the runaway former factory long liner was shot full of holes by a Coast Guard cutter in December. Now, the agency is taking aim at the vessel owner’s finances, proposing at least $155,000 in fines after the 170-foot vessel was left adrift and threatening navigation safety in international shipping lanes when it broke loose from a tow from Unalaska/Dutch Harbor to a scrapyard in Mexico.,, The Coast Guard has initiated a Class I Civil Penalty against the owner of the vessels Alaska Patriot and Alaska Pioneer,,, >click to read<14:11

FFAW-Unifor files Supreme Court application in ‘desperate’ attempt to block vote on union representation: FISH-NL

The Federation of Independent Sea Harvesters of Newfoundland and Labrador (FISH-NL) describes the latest legal maneuvers by the FFAW-Unifor to try and derail a vote by inshore harvesters on their union representation as an “act of desperation.” “The FFAW-Unifor executive knows they’ll lose a vote, and are desperate to cling to power,” says Ryan Cleary, President of FISH-NL. “They’re using the courts and legal costs to try and quash the FISH-NL movement, but we’re past the point of no return — a vote must happen before inshore harvesters and the fishery can move forward.”>click to read< 13:42

Offshore Wind Fiasco: Renewables Industry Faces $Billions In Compensation For Early Repairs

Ørsted must repair up to 2,000 wind turbine blades because the leading edge of the blades have become worn down after just a few years at sea. The company has a total of 646 wind turbines from Siemens Gamesa, which may potentially be affected to some extent, Ørsted confirmed. The wind turbine owner will not disclose the bill, but says that the financial significance is “small”. However, it is far from just the Anholt Park that is affected. The blades at several British Ørsted offshore wind farms must also be repaired after just a few years on the water. >click to read<12:12

Their worst fears are now starting to be realized: Fishers forced out of business

Shadow Minister for Primary Industries, Mick Veitch, met with fishers from the Great Lakes yesterday February 22 at the Wallis Lake Fishing Co-op to highlight the impact of the State government’s commercial fishing reforms. The reforms have forced a number of family run fishing businesses to exit the industry, while businesses association with the local fishing industry are under pressure. An Upper House committee last year heard directly from co-ops over the impacts of these reforms – and was warned over the viability of co-ops if the reforms proceeded. The worst fears are now starting to be realized. >click to read< 10:36

Outrage in Newfoundland as Indigenous groups get cut of Arctic surf clam fishery

Federal Fisheries Minister Dominic LeBlanc’s decision to cleave off 25 per cent of the lucrative Arctic surf clam fishery and give it to a newly formed consortium of Indigenous groups has blindsided those who have depended on the industry on Newfoundland’s Burin Peninsula for decades. “This is an unprecedented move,” Grand Bank Mayor Rex Matthews told CBC Radio’s The Broadcast. “To come in and expropriate 25 per cent of a quota that we’ve had for the last 27 years.” >click to read< 10:06

F/V Dianne: Mystery remains after search fails to find any bodies

Queensland police have confirmed that no human remains have been found inside the salvaged trawler FV Dianne after inspecting the vessel at Bundaberg port. Disaster Victim Identification officers scoured the wreck on Thursday and Friday, but hopes for closure for the families of the missing men was not forthcoming. Police have recovered a number of personal items from the vessel, Video >click to read<09:32

NMFS Weighing Privately Funded Assessment of Summer Flounder Stock

For the first time, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) will consider privately funded science in formulating regulations for summer flounder. Funded by the Save the Summer Flounder Fishery Fund (SSFFF) and its contributing partners, a groundbreaking sex-structured model created by Dr. Patrick Sullivan of Cornell University was presented in January to the NMFS’ Stock Assessment Workshop in the hope of obtaining a clearer picture of the summer flounder population. The ultimate goal is to improve the accuracy of the next stock assessment,,, >click to read< 23:14

F/V Dianne: Experts work through the wet to get answers

Investigations into the sinking of MV Dianne are continuing today at the Bundaberg Port Marina site. Firefighters were at the scene early yesterday morning to assess the safety of the vessel before investigation teams could go on board.  NewsMail photographer Tahlia Stehbens was on the ground and said the area was a hive of emergency services officers.,, “Two ambulance vehicles are also on scene as well as police officers. A cleaning service has just started pumping out waste from the trawler.”  The area was cordoned off to media and the public. >click to read< 21:08

Study reveals fishing’s startling global footprint: co-author Boris Worm, ‘It totally blows me away’

Global fishing efforts are so wide ranging that fleets covered more than 460 million kilometres in 2016 — a distance equal to going to the moon and back 600 times. That startling revelation is contained in a newly published study in Science that quantifies fishing’s global footprint for the first time. “I’ve been working on fishing for 20 years and it totally blows me away,” co-author Boris Worm, a marine biologist at Dalhousie University in Halifax, said of the findings. The study — which included researchers from Global Fishing Watch, National Geographic, Google and U.S. universities such as Stanford — used satellite feeds and common ship tracking technology known as the automatic identification system (AIS). >click to read< 15:47 

Unusual catch at Usal

Last week, while pulling up crab pots north of Usal Beach, the crew of the Gloria II got a surprise when they discovered a Maine lobster hanging off the side of one of the pots. While no one was exactly sure what a Maine lobster was doing in the Pacific Ocean (Spiny lobsters range as far north as Monterey, but look quite different from their East Coast cousins), they have been caught very occasionally along the North Coast in the past. >click to read< 14:16

A conflict of interest and possible corruption

Benguela Global, the fund manager that raised concerns about Capitec’s loan policies at the same time as Viceroy published a critical report on the bank, has made public its objection to recent developments at fishing company Oceana, suggesting the developments are a “related party transaction entailing a massive conflict of interest and potentially even laced with corruption”.,, In a nutshell, Oceana acquired 100% of US fishmeal producer Daybrook Fisheries in July 2015 for $382.3 million as part of its bid to diversify its operations and grow globally as there were few options remaining in South Africa. >click to read< 13:14

FISH-NL questions whether Ottawa purposely is out to eliminate inshore fishery and outports along with it

The Federation of Independent Sea Harvesters of Newfoundland and Labrador (FISH-NL) says Ottawa’s decision to award a new Arctic surf clam licence to East Coast aboriginal groups amounts to Indigenous reconciliation on the backs of inshore harvesters and rural communities.,, “Our inshore harvesters and rural communities should be at the head of the line for any new quotas,” says Ryan Cleary, President of FISH-NL. “Our harvesters are starving for fish, and the feds are taking from the few healthy stocks we have left, and carving them up for groups with no connection to the resource. That’s just wrong.” >click to read< 12:07

Clearwater Seafoods to pursue legal options after surf clam licence goes to First Nations group

Clearwater Seafoods says it will be pursuing legal options after its monopoly on Arctic surf clams came to an end Wednesday when a new licence for the species was issued to the Five Nations Clam Company. The company called the licence award a “failure in public policy and abuse of power by the Minister.”,,LeBlanc’s announcement that a new entrant was coming for Arctic surf clams was a controversial one in Newfoundland and Labrador, particularly in Grand Bank, where Mayor Rex Matthews was vocal in his opposition. >click to read< 11:16

Skipper Christopher Lee Jarman admits trawler grounding charge

The skipper of a fishing boat that ran aground near Canterbury’s Lake Ellesmere has admitted he failed to ensure a proper look-out was kept. The 22-metre Lady Sarah grounded on Kaitorete Spit in December 2016 and remained on the shingle shore for two weeks before it was broken into pieces and moved to a contractor’s yard. Skipper Christopher Lee Jarman, 35, of Heathcote Valley, pleaded guilty on Thursday to failing to keep the look-out and causing unnecessary danger or risk to property or persons, including the crew. >click to read< 10:44

Hit TV series ‘Wicked Tuna,’ filmed off Cape Ann, releases a new season

The fishing tales of six captains on the hunt for giant tuna swim through the airwaves starting next month, when National Geographic’s hit series “Wicked Tuna” premieres its seventh season. The stakes are always high at sea, as the Gloucester-based fishermen compete to pull in the most lucrative catch of “monstah” bluefin, which can be worth upward of $20,000 per tuna. Season seven kicks off with an extended 90-minute episode on Sunday, March 11, at 9 p.m. on the National Geographic Channel. >click to read< 10:10

Cape Breton lobster size requirements increasing to feed American market

The Inverness South Fishermen’s Association says its members will be fishing for slightly larger lobsters over the next two years. The association has received word that Fisheries and Oceans Canada has approved an increase in the minimum carapace size in lobster fishing area 26B, said president Jordan MacDougall,,, MacDougall said it will increase to 81.7 millimetres for the 2018 season, and 82.5 millimetres in 2019, which is the minimum size to allow Canadian lobsters to enter the U.S. without processing. >click to read<09:17

Post Rafael, New Bedford Fishing Industry Looks to Move Forwad

For perhaps the first time, at least publicly, fishermen on Carlos Rafael vessels sat in the same room Wednesday as John Bullard, the former regional administrator for NOAA, who implemented a groundfishing ban for those vessels. Bullard, wearing a blue NOAA jacket, sat in the front of four-person panel brought together by Rhode Island Public Radio  The fishermen, wearing baseball caps and New Bedford Ship Supply sweatshirts, sat to the left of the panel, which discussed fishing in New Bedford after Carlos Rafael at Star Store.>click to read<21:16

New Arctic Surf Clam license to benefit First Nations in Atlantic Canada and Quebec

Enhancing access to fisheries provides an opportunity to create social and economic benefits for coastal and Indigenous communities, and further promote economic prosperity for middle class Atlantic Canadians. Today, the Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, announced that a new license for Arctic Surf Clam will be issued to the Five Nations Clam Company. This decision will significantly enhance Indigenous participation in the offshore fishery in Atlantic Canada. >click to read<19:29

New sea lion wrinkle in the Willamette River threatens sturgeon

Oregon biologists attempting to save the Willamette River’s sharply declined winter steelhead run are facing a new twist in their vexing battle against fish-hungry sea lions at Willamette Falls. The river has seen an unusual influx this winter of large, sturgeon-eating Steller sea lions. Anglers from the falls to the Portland harbor report watching the carnage. “Sturgeon are on our radar,” said Shaun Clements of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. “We have seen up to 10 Steller sea lions at the falls, which is more than typical.” >click to read<18:24

What Does the Jones Act Mean for Offshore Wind?

The Block Island Wind Farm, a 30-megawatt wind farm located just off the coast of Rhode Island, began operations in December 2016, fulfilling the goal of the project’s developer, Deepwater Wind LLC, to build America’s first offshore wind farm. The Block Island Wind Farm consists of only five wind turbines and is tiny in comparison to the large offshore wind farms operating off the coasts of Europe, but Deepwater Wind is planning larger wind farms off the coasts of New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Maryland and New Jersey. Other developers are doing the same with other projects up and down the East Coast of the United States. >click to read< 14:37

Des Allemands father, son saved from drowning in the Mississippi River

Whitney Curole is a firm believer that the rescue of he and his son from the freezing waters of the Mississippi River is nothing short of a miracle. “I knew when the first big wave came over the boat … I knew it couldn’t take that much water,” Curole said…. Just as he had so many times before without incident, Curole was riding the “ship waves” toward a dock in Venice at about 4:30 p.m. last Tuesday to sell the sharks they caught there. Suddenly, his 27-by-9-foot aluminum flat boat went down on a wave, but was over topped by water of the next wave instead of bouncing back up as expected. >click to read<13:46

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 65′ Blount Marine Steel Longliner, 400HP Iveco with Federal Permits

Specifications, information and 6 photos >click here< To see all the boats in this series, >Click here<13:27

Slow crawl for crab: Seasonal delays stifle coastal economy

Price strikes, delays and poor weather have plagued the 2017-18 Dungeness crab season from the start. Roughly four weeks into the season, landings for the non-tribal coastal crab fishery in Washington were 5,574,792 pounds, only about 60 percent of the total catch during the first weeks of 2016-17 season. “It’s clear this season we are behind,” Dan Ayres, coastal shellfish manager with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, said upon seeing the first official numbers of the season on Friday, Feb 16. >click to read<12:35

Victoria Nuland speaks about her experience of living with 80 Russian fishermen on one boat

American diplomat Victoria Nuland said that she could understand Russian culture better after she had worked with Russian fishermen for six months. The reason for the story was a video posted by Aleksei Navalny, in which Russian Deputy Prime Minister Sergei Prikhodkov said to businessman Oleg Deripaska that he considered Victoria Nuland a friend, even though she had an aversion to Russia for living with Russian seamen on a fishing boat for six years in her 20s.  According to Nuland, a joint US-Soviet enterprise allowed American sailors to fish in the 20-mile zone and deliver the catch to Soviet sailors, who were not allowed to fish in that part of the sea,” the diplomat said. >click to read<11:59

F/V Dianne Recovery: Specialist teams ready for investigation

THE MV Dianne has now been transferred to dry land. Crews worked for most of today to correctly balance the fishing trawler on to a travelift so it could be moved from the oceanfront of the Bundaberg Port Marina. It is now on land and in a secure location.  The Queensland Fire Service scientific team and urban rescue team will examine the safety of the vessel first thing tomorrow morning before investigations commence. Specialist teams, including a disaster victim identification team, are on standby as part of investigations surrounding the MV Dianne’s tragic sinking in October last year. >click to read< 10:32

Lobster emoji is redesigned after backlash from crabby Maine residents

The company responsible for making new emojis had to change the design for their lobster after an outcry erupted over the number of legs it had. Unicode Consortium announced Wednesday that the crustacean emoji would be a part of the new 157 emojis, slated to be released later this year. But Maine residents soon had issue with the image’s eight legs, because lobsters have 10.  ‘Sen. Angus King from Maine has certainly been vocal about his love of the lobster emoji, but was kind enough to spare us the indignity of pointing out that we left off two legs,’ Emojipedia wrote. >click to read< 09:51

Boat warfare

Even in a state famous for it fish wars, a violent collision between three commercial-salmon fishing boats in Prince William Sound that left a crewman seriously injured in the summer of 2016 has attracted more than its share of attention. But then most Alaska fish wars don’t deteriorate into actual boat-to-boat combat.,,, Court documents early on, however, revealed there was a GoPro camera on board the Temptation when the collision occurred, and now some of that video has emerged. >click to read< 08:01

Man Gets 56 Months for False Distress Calls, Threats to Coast Guard

A 39-year-old Newport News man was sentenced in Norfolk federal court on Tuesday to 56 months in prison for making a false distress call and threats to the U.S. Coast Guard, officials said.
Justin P. Stahmer was convicted of the crimes by a federal jury on Nov. 13, 2017, according to a U.S. Department of Justice news release. Court documents state that Stahmer made a false distress call on June 20, 2016 while several miles northeast of Cape Henry. >click to read<07:20