Don Cuddy: Local crab fisherman finds a niche market with slime eels

Slime eel, it’s what’s for dinner.  Well perhaps not on menus around here but in South Korea ‘ggomjangeo’ is extremely popular and, barbecued, is sold on the street like hot dogs. With scant recognition a fishery for these scavenging bottom dwellers has been prosecuted in New England for the past 40 years. Hagfish, as they are also known, are primitive deep-sea creatures and reputedly the only living creature with a skull but no vertebrae, although, given recent events, there may be some elected officials who could potentially rival that claim. Atlantic Red Crab company founder Jon Williams has been fishing these eels since 1999.,, >click here to read< 20:02

Fish Board: Spotter planes out, Chinook actions on hold for now

The Alaska Board of Fisheries voted to ban spotter planes in Southeast salmon fisheries and provided some relief to struggling commercial troll fishermen on Friday, the first full day of deliberations for the board. Though the board made significant changes to Southeast finfish regulations, Juneau fishermen were left with a cliffhanger: salmon action plans aimed at protecting struggling Taku and Chilkat river Chinook — which could leave fishermen docked for a significant part of the season — won’t be voted on until at least Saturday morning. >click here to read< 17:19

Steinbeck boat being restored – A crew is bringing her back to life, plank by plank, spike by spike, nail by nail.

Somewhere in the Western Flyer there is a spirit, said Chris Chase, project director for the Western Flyer Foundation, the nonprofit group restoring the fishing boat that carried Ed Ricketts and John Steinbeck to The Sea of Cortez in 1940. “I don’t know who it is,” said the 51-year-old shipwright. “It could be Ed (Ricketts). It could be John Steinbeck. It could be Carol Steinbeck (John Steinbeck’s first wife).” Whoever it is, something has saved the 80-year-old, 77-foot purse seiner from destruction. >click here to read< 14:31

Missing fishermen feared dead ‘wouldn’t last more than five minutes’ in freezing Loch Fyne, says uncle

The search for Duncan MacDougall, 46, and Przemek Krawczykis in the Argyll waters is now a recovery operation despite a heroic attempt to save them. The pair became trapped when the 40ft Nancy Glen overturned – with pal John Miller, 34, being rescued by a passing vessel. Duncan’s uncle, Thomas Aitchison, 62, says his family are struggling to cope but have to assume the pair are dead due to the amount of time they would have been in the water. >click here to read<13:56

Russian fish escaping into Louisiana waters? Sturgeon farming plan raises alarm

Nutria, feral hogs and Asian carp are just a few of the foreign invaders harming Louisiana’s marshes and rivers. Now the state is entertaining the idea of allowing the import and farming of sterlet sturgeon, a Russian fish currently banned in Louisiana. Why? The basic answer: its eggs are the food equivalent of gold, fetching prices of nearly $100 per ounce as top-shelf caviar. A plan under consideration by the state Department of Wildlife and Fisheries would permit the raising of the sterlet sturgeon, a major producer of caviar in the Caspian and Black Sea regions, in indoor pools. >click here to read< 12:14

Letter: Stop digging a graveyard for our fisheries

Our fishing industry in Newfoundland and Labrador is in shambles, and yet politicians and decision-makers are blind to the fish bones pilling up in the graveyard, and with it, our prime industry, economy and our communities. Either that, or they simply do not care or have a handle on this industry they are responsible for managing and growing. Are they aware or concerned about the rapid expansion of the Canadian factory freezer trawler operations off our coasts while our groundfishery recovery is stalled and shrimp and crab fisheries in decline? >click here to read< 11:05

Bidders hungry for part of Arctic surf clam fishery after decades-long monopoly

The competition for newly available Arctic surf clam quota off Cape Breton has three times more applicants than previously reported, which is a sign of the interest in a fishery that has been controlled by a single company for decades. The Department of Fisheries and Oceans says it is evaluating nine proposals vying for 8,924 tonnes of surf clams in 2018. Until this year, the surf clam fishery was held entirely by Clearwater Seafoods,,, >click here to read<10:37

Crustacean Elation! – N.S. brewery launching Lobster-flavoured beer

A Nova Scotia craft brewery has put together two East Coast favourites to brew up something new: lobster-infused beer. Saltbox Brewery in Mahone Bay is now fermenting its first batch of Crustacean Elation—a creation that involved the use of whole lobsters early in the brewing process. Spokesman Patrick Jardine said it was something they had been talking about for some time, and finally decided to give it a try. >click here to read, cheers!< 09:44

Corps of Engineers called in to do an emergency dredging of Ocean City inlet

Ocean City is getting emergency federal attention, but you wouldn’t know it unless you do business on the water. Rising sand bars have already caused one ship carrying 11,000 pounds of fish to run aground, and the fear is many others could suffer a similar fate. Congressman Andy Harris (R-MD) said, “The port in Ocean City is an important commercial port obviously and not only for fisherman, but for other industry so we have to keep that port open its the Army Corps job to do that, and I’m glad they agreed to do this emergency dredge.” >click here to read<08:28

North Carolina Fisheries Association Weekly Update for January 19, 2018

CONGRESSMAN WALTER JONES CALL FOR TOUGH MEASURES ON SHRIMP IMPORTS!  Click here to read the Weekly Update, to read all the updates Click here, for older updates listed as NCFA click here 19:57

A ‘big win’ for fish – Increased spill over dams will help Columbia River spring Chinook

Touted as a big win for fish, a plan to increase springtime spill at eight federal dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers was approved last week by a federal judge.,, Spill is a term for allowing water to flow over a dam instead of passing that water through turbines that generate electrical power. Out-migrating juvenile salmon and steelhead smolts that pass through these turbines are often killed, either directly or by delayed mortality. Spill allows more smolts to escape the turbines and results in a greater return of adult fish. >click here to read<19:22 

Snow crab landing in Bering Sea

The Bering Sea opilio snow crab fishery is slowly moving forward, with 2 percent of the quota landed. Eight vessels made nine landings for a total weight in the past week of some 471,000 pounds, from a quota of 18.5 million pounds, according to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game in Unalaska. The number of snow crab per pot is down somewhat from the same period last year. The most recent count was 201 crustaceans last week, down from 238 last year, according to Fish and Game. “From talking to the fleet, it’s been a slow start for the boats that are out there opie fishing,” said state fisheries biologist Ethan Nichols. But it’s likely to pick up, >click here to read<17:53

Loch Fyne search for missing fishermen scaled back

A major search for two fishermen missing after their boat capsized in Loch Fyne in Argyll and Bute has been scaled back. The alarm was raised by a third man who was pulled from the water by the crew of a passing boat on Thursday evening. Despite efforts of those on scene to keep it afloat, the 40ft Nancy Glenn TT100 fishing vessel sank. Lifeboats, a coastguard helicopter and rescue teams, as well as local boats, have been searching for the men. The operation has now been scaled back and further efforts will resume in the morning. >click here to read< 13:09

Young captain bets on NJ’s commercial fishing industry with new boat

As the sun rose on the docks in Point Pleasant Thursday morning, a rare sight for many New Jersey longtime fisherman came into view: a new commercial fishing boat. “This is the first time I’ve ever been in a brand new boat, commercial, anyway. It’s a beautiful thing,” fisherman Charlie Burke said. The captain of the 54-foot, $2 million boat is Pat Fehily, 28, who drove it overnight on its maiden voyage from Maine, where it was built over 19 months. >click here to read, video<12:26

Science Pushed to Back Burner, as Swiss Outlaw Live Lobster Boiling

Some find it strange, while others, simply fascinating. And others still put it on their dinner menu because they’re drawn to its preparation in a macabre sort of way. But the government of Switzerland believes the practice of throwing a live lobster in a pot of boiling water is unnecessary, and most of all, cruel.,, And this heartfelt legislative decision – presumably not on humanitarian, but lobsterian, grounds – was made Jan. 10. In short, the Swiss simply feared that these tasty, sea creatures experienced agonizing pain during those final, heated moments of their lives. There’s only one problem with that: it’s impossible, since there’s no scientific evidence to support the position. >click here to read< 10:09

“Take a dip, make a difference,” – N.S. fisherman issues chilly challenge to raise money for families of fire victims

A southwest Nova Scotia fisherman has taken the ice bucket challenge and upped the ante to raise funds for victims of a horrific fire earlier this month in Pubnico Head, N.S. Instead of emptying a bucket of cold water over your head, Todd Newell’s challenge involves immersing your entire body in icy water. Specifically, numbingly cold water found in the lobster holding tank of his fishing boat, Ted’s Legacy. “Take a dip, make a difference,” says the West Head man. >click here to read< 08:57 

Stuck again, fish on board

There have been meetings, there have been talks, there have been “action items” and there has been dredging, but boats are still running aground in the state’s only ocean port, and the commercial fishermen have had just about enough. “We’ve been battling this for five years, I just don’t know what to do,” said Mike Coppa of the fishing vessel Instigator. “What happened [on Friday] was a crock of crap. We’re told they have to study this, they have to study that, but in the meantime, the boat has to get from point A to point B.” >click here to read< 08:05

Judge excludes drug test on Maine fishing boat captain facing manslaughter charges

A federal judge has restricted the federal government’s ability to use results of a blood test taken from a Cushing fishing boat captain accused of causing the deaths of two crew members when his lobster boat sank during a November 2014 gale. U.S. District Court Judge D. Brock Hornby issued his ruling Wednesday, Jan. 17 in the case of 29-year-old Christopher A. Hutchinson. >click here to read< 16:57

FISH-NL – Solidarity isn’t forever with FFAW/Unifor so much as when it suits them

The Federation of Independent Sea Harvesters of Newfoundland and Labrador (FISH-NL) says Unifor’s reasoning for its break from the Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) is nothing short of ironic and hypocritical. “Unifor, the largest private-sector union in Canada, is splitting from the CLC over a disagreement about the rights of workers to choose what union should represent them, while one of its affiliate unions, the FFAW, has blocked the province’s inshore harvesters for 13 months from voting on their union fate,” says Ryan Cleary, President of FISH-NL. >click here to read< 14:41

Invasive Shrimp Grows to More Than a Pound in TX Waters

Did you know there are shrimp in Texas that can grow to weigh more than a pound? The black tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon) or tiger shrimp is an aggressive mollusk that can grow to a foot in length and weigh a pound according to Texas Invasive Species Institute. “In addition to it’s unusually large size, it can be identified by black stripes across the dorsal side of the tail. It can also be black in body color with orange stripes on it’s back, resembling a tiger.” >click here to read< 13:06

Lawsuit filed to save North Atlantic Right Whales from death in fishing gear

Today’s lawsuit against the National Marine Fisheries Service, filed in federal court in Washington, D.C., alleges that federal management of the American lobster fishery violates the Endangered Species Act and the Marine Mammal Protection Act. The lawsuit seeks to force the agency to sufficiently examine the fishery’s impacts on North Atlantic right whales and adopt additional measures to prevent more entanglements in the future. The lobster fishery is the most active fixed-gear fishery in the northeastern United States. >click here to read< 12:08 

Alaska commercial fisherman who robbed creeks of spawning salmon forfeits boat and gear

An Alaska commercial fisherman who prosecutors say robbed creeks of salmon heading to spawning grounds has lost his fishing vessel, nets, skiff and other gear, under a sentence imposed last week in Prince of Wales District Court. Curtis Demmert, now 32 of Klawock, was fishing in Coco Harbor, on Dall Island to the west of Prince of Wales Island in Southeast Alaska, according to the charging document and other court filings. >click here to read< 09:24

On a dangerous trip, New Jersey fishermen struggle to hold on

It was 10 degrees outside, a blizzard was on its way, and Roy Deal was in no mood to fish. Deal sat in the blue captain’s chair in the wheelhouse of the Donna Lynn, his 60-foot fishing boat, and felt cold air penetrating cracks in the glass. He passed the seawall at 3:55 a.m. Three hours to sunrise. Deal gave the wheel a hard half-spin. The Donna Lynn pitched to starboard, away from the lights of Manhattan. Deal held the turn till his bow pointed north and east, into the black Atlantic. This trip would be dangerous. The pay would be low. And Deal was feeling grumpy. >click here to read< 08:37

The government is what created Carlos Rafael

Bill Straus saw the writing on the wall years ago. In 2009 -eight years before Carlos Rafael went to prison – the representative of Bristol’s 10th District spoke out during the establishment of the current catch-share system in the Northeast fishery. And even with Rafael behind bars, Straus says the threat of another Codfather emerging is ever present. “The risk is still there,” Straus said. “And that’s why what comes out of the different remedies is so important. >click here to read< 22:52

Fishing captain who helped save Tamil refugees passes away

Gus Dalton, a fishing captain who was by most accounts — including his own — an accidental hero for saving the lives of more than 150 Tamil refugees off southern Newfoundland, has died. He was 87. Dalton made international headlines in August 1986 when a routine fishing trip on a foggy evening took a fateful turn.  Scores of Sri Lankan Tamil refugees may have perished had it not been for Dalton, who came across their open boats about six miles off St. Shott’s, on the southern tip of Newfoundland’s Avalon Peninsula. >click here to read< 19:39

Coast Guard, NOAA seize illegal shrimp catch

The Coast Guard and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration seized approximately 6,000 pounds of shrimp with an estimated price of $60,000 from the 68-foot fishing vessel Ronald E. near the Dry Tortugas Shrimp Sanctuary Preservation Area, Friday. The vessel Ronald E. was observed fishing inside the marine sanctuary and was boarded by a Coast Guard Cutter Raymond Evans and NOAA joint boarding team. The boarding team cited the vessel for illegally fishing inside a national marine sanctuary and safety violations. >click here to read< 17:10 

Homer halibut fishermen facing more competition from the East Coast

The International Halibut Commission, or the IPHC, will kick off its annual meeting in Portland Monday. The international regulatory body is expected to slash the total allowable catch of halibut on the West Coast by 24 percent due to declining stocks. With potentially less Pacific halibut on the market, prices are likely to increase, but a new direct competitor on the East Coast may hamper the market’s ability to compensate for lower halibut stocks in Alaska. >click here to read< 16:33

Crabbers set to snap – Frustrations mount as price deadlock and towering swells delay season

Frustrations grew Tuesday as crabbers and processors continued drawn-out negotiations over 2018’s opening price for Dungeness crab. All was silent in the Ilwaco channel and Port of Chinook in recent days when boats ordinarily would have been noisily traveling back and forth to crabbing grounds. No lights bobbed on the ocean off the Long Beach Peninsula.  Commercial crab harvesting was set to open Monday south of the Klipsan Beach line, but price negotiations and ocean conditions are keeping boats in port. >click here to read<15:08

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 50′ x 20′ Fiberglass Trawler/Scalloper, 6 Cylinder CAT C18, Perkins – 24 KW, Permits

Specifications, information and 57 photos click here To see all the boats in this series, Click here14:00

Michelle Malkin Investigates – Fishing Wars | Drowning in Regulations

Commercial fishing boats in New England are going under at an alarming rate, and hard-working families are being demonized by a multimillion-dollar environmental industry whose only product to sell is fear. In this episode, Michelle Malkin travels to the Northeast to hear the stories of people in the fishing industry who are drowning in government regulations. >Watch the full version, click here< 13:25