Ninth Circuit Skewers Calif. Commercial Fishing License Fee Scheme

A challenge to California’s scheme of cash for commercial fishing licenses went before the Ninth Circuit on Tuesday. Lead plaintiff Kevin Marilley filed the case in 2013, seeking to represent a class of commercial herring fishermen who are not California residents but who wish to make their living there. At the time of the lawsuit, nonresident fees for commercial fishing licenses and for fishing vessel registration permits were three times higher than the fees California residents paid. Read the rest here 16:58

(no comments yet) Comment

Growers say DFO dragging its feet on approving cultivation of giant clams in B.C.

In recent years, the demand for the giant clam – especially in China – has sent prices soaring. Geoduck (pronounced gooeyduck) has a landed value of about $10 to $11 per pound in North America and can sell for $30 per pound in China. Geoduck has become so valuable, in fact, that illegal poaching is now raising concerns about the geoduck population in Washington state. B.C. has a wild geoduck industry that is already worth about $47 million a year in sales – more valuable than oyster and clam farming ($33 million). But it is exclusive to divers who hold licences for harvesting the giant clam in the wild. Read the rest here 16:08

(no comments yet) Comment

Crabbers blame the 2010 BP oil spill for Crab Shortage – Searching for Answers

blue_crabMany crabbers blame the 2010 BP oil spill, which leaked an estimated 4.9 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. The year before the spill, crabbers across the state experienced banner crops. In the Terrebonne Basin, crabbers pulled in more than 14 million pounds, the highest in more than a decade, those in the Barataria Basin pulled in their largest haul since 2006. But landings in the Barataria and Terrebonne basins are down 38 percent and 31 percent, respectively, following the spill, according to recent state data. Across Louisiana, the decrease has been 23 percent. Read the rest here 14:36

(no comments yet) Comment

Sharks and stingrays in the Pamlico?

The only large shark I’ve ever actually seen in Pamlico Sound was behind Cedar Island. Two large commercial fishing boats were going about setting out a huge “long-haul net” in one of the unusually deep (maybe 9-feet deep) sections of the sound. The two boats gradually played out the net off their sterns as they went in opposite directions, circled around and completed the net-set with the estimated net length of one mile. With the aid of several smaller boats,,, Read the rest here 13:10

(no comments yet) Comment

The George W. Collier, a 115-year-old oyster fishing skipjack finally getting new life

skipjack restorationFor a decade, the skipjack George W. Collier lay at the end of a long road in Cape Charles, literally and figuratively. The 72-foot-long boat was built in Maryland in 1900 and was once used as an oyster fishing vessel, able to easily navigate shallow waters. But when engine-powered boats replaced skipjacks, the George W. Collier was left on a mud bank. Fewer than 30 of the traditional boats remain today. On Thursday, the skipjack was finally sent to a shipyard, on its way to being restored in its birthplace on Deal Island in Maryland. 8 photos, Read the rest here 11:25

(no comments yet) Comment

Commercial Horseshoe Crab Fishery in Del. to Close July 9

Officials say Delaware’s commercial horseshoe crab harvest is approaching this year’s quota of 154,527 horseshoe crabs, prompting DNREC’s Division of Fish & Wildlife to announce that, in accordance with Delaware law and regulations, the horseshoe crab fishery will close at 12:01 a.m., Thursday. Afterward, officials say, it is unlawful in Delaware to harvest horseshoe crabs this year. Read the rest here 11:05

(no comments yet) Comment

From the UBC “think tank” – B.C. salmon prices set to skyrocket with climate change

The report Out of Stock predicts that by 2050 there could be a 21 per cent decline in sockeye, a 10 per cent decline in chum, and a 15 per cent decline in sablefish. “This is a really tangible way for people to understand the impact of climate change,” says Rashid Sumaila, one of the study’s authors who has been working with the UBC’s fisheries research unit for over 20 years. Alrighty then! Read the rest here 10:40

(no comments yet) Comment

The distorted view of reality – A Knockout Blow for American Fish Stocks?

gib01Today, in the New York Times, Oceana’s Gib Brogan ignores the facts of the New England fishing industry, a hollowed out shell of what once was an industry of prosperity, dismantled by disgraceful government science, that ignores predator/prey of an out of balance eco system, and of all things, climate change redistribution of certain stocks, Cod, insinuating all fish stocks of the multi specie fishery collapsed. Click the links at the article. Read the Op-ed here. The comment section is open. 09:31

2 comments Comment

Fisheries board member cited for violating fishery closure

FishBoard09A member of the Alaska Board of Fisheries was cited by wildlife troopers in the commercial fishing hotbed of Dillingham last week for continuing to fish in an area after it had been closed.  Frederick “Fritz” Johnson was fishing for salmon using a drift gillnet with Gust McCarr, his fishing partner of six years, when he was cited. The two men thought fishing closed at 6:30 p.m., when the actual closure happened at 6 p.m., Johnson told Alaska Dispatch News on Monday. They noticed an Alaska Wildlife Troopers plane circling overhead shortly after 6. Read the rest here 08:06

(no comments yet) Comment

Dear Greenpeace USA, We are in receipt of your petition, and are responding,,,

Wrecking the Planet, one campaign at a time!

We are in receipt of your petition, and are responding on behalf of member companies Bumble Bee, Chicken of the Sea, and StarKist. We’ve reviewed your petition and attached letter and have found several inaccurate aspects and outright misinformation that we would appreciate you address. While we always welcome feedback from consumers, it does concern us that some of the petition’s signatories appear to come from communities of questionable provenance like “Jerrabomberra, North Carolina”. It is our sincere hope that you have vetted and authenticated,,, Read the rest her  20:01

(no comments yet) Comment

The Fishery – a dangerous place to work

 DFO imposes a host of arbitrary rules on fishing enterprises that inherently increase the risks that harvesters must take to pursue their livelihood. DFO limits the size and capability of the fishing vessels to the point that the vessels are incapable of providing adequate working space and stability relative to the conditions demanded by the environment and the workplace activity within which harvesters perform their daily tasks. Read the rest here 18:03

(no comments yet) Comment

A Stern Look At Seafood Scare Stories

In 2012, well known radio and TV host Howard Stern announced he had become a pescetarian. Fish became the outspoken personality’s primary source of protein as he embarked on a new and healthier lifestyle. Three years later the baseless rhetoric spewed by groups bent on distorting seafood’s inherently healthy building blocks has Stern confused. On his show Stern recently noted his own mercury levels with concern. What he didn’t note is that there has never been a single case of mercury poisoning from the normal consumption of commercial seafood,,, Read the rest here 15:02

(no comments yet) Comment

Pew calls for ban on international trade of Pacific Bluefin

The Pew Charitable Trusts is calling for a ban on international trade of Pacific bluefin, after what it terms as a failure to come up with new conservation measures at the 89th meeting of the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC), which just ended in Guayaquil, Ecuador. “The failure the IATTC to agree to reduce catch limits or adopt a long-term rebuilding plan for Pacific bluefin tuna leaves the species at risk of population collapse,” said Amanda Nickson, director of global tuna conservation for Pew. Read the rest here  WWF expressed concern about the lack of stricter measures to protect shark, and Pacific bluefin tuna stocks. Read the rest here 14:11

(no comments yet) Comment

Jonah Crab Hearing – Portland, Me. tonight, 18:00 – Portsmouth, NH, 19:30, Tuesday

Interstate fishery regulators are holding hearings in Portland at Casco Bay Lines Conference Room, 56 Commercial Street, Portland, tonight, 18:00, and at the Urban Forestry Center in Portsmouth 19:30 p.m. on Tuesday. Regulators with the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission say the interstate management plan would regulate issues such as minimum size. 12:07

(no comments yet) Comment

North Carolina Fisheries Association Weekly Update for July 3, 2015

NCFA11:30 AM (5 minutes ago) Click to read the Weekly Update for July s, 2015 as a PDF To read all the updates, click here 11:39

(no comments yet) Comment

Fishermen Eagerly Await Pink Salmon Opener; Astonishingly Early Start to Alaska Chum Salmon

3-Minute Market Insight: This year is looking to be a good one for Pink salmon, both in Russia and here in North America. In the Prince William Sound, fishing will actually start a little later than first expected. Watch the Tradex 3 Minute Update here 10:06

(no comments yet) Comment

In the Race to Control the Arctic, the U.S. Lags Behind

 It’s a new kind of geopolitical cold war, and the U.S. is in danger of losing. “We’re not even in the same league as Russia right now,” Coast Guard Commandant Paul F. Zukunft says. “We’re not playing in this game at all.”,,, Read the rest here 08:23

(no comments yet) Comment

Iran to export 28,000 tonnes of fishery products to Russia.

An official at Iran Fisheries Organization says the country will soon export about 28,000 tonnes of various kinds of fishery products to its northern neighbor, Russia. Isa Golshahi, Iran Fisheries Organization’s director general for quality improvement, processing and development of fisheries market, told Mehr news agency on Sunday that according to contracts signed between the two countries, Iran will start exporting fishery products to Russia in late August. Read the rest here 17:35

(no comments yet) Comment

Commission denies Barham authority to open white-shrimp season

In an unusual move, the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission denied a request from the agency it manages to grant authority to Sec. Robert Barham to open the inshore white-shrimp season. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries biologist Jeff Marx asked the commission to allow Barham to open the season if agency research showed white shrimp of a marketable size in Louisiana’s marshes before the Aug. 6 commission meeting.  Read the rest here 16:49

(no comments yet) Comment

A look at what the British fishing industry once was and how the UK fishing fleet was betrayed.

What Happened to our Fishing fleet? How did the UK go from having the biggest and most technologically advanced fishing fleet in the world to virtually nothing? How do today’s trawlermen cope when the odds are stacked against them? What is the future and how can we make things better? Fishing Against the Tide examines what the fishing industry once was, what it is today and how fishing could be once again. Watch the video here 15:25

1 comment Comment

Rhode Island Fishermen’s Alliance Weekly Update, July 5, 2015

rifa2The Rhode Island Fishermen’s Alliance is dedicated to its mission of continuing to help create sustainable fisheries without putting licensed fishermen out of business.” Read the update here  To read all the updates, click here 11:39

(no comments yet) Comment

Prince William Sound Herring count looking up

Marine mammals and birds forage on milky herring spawn in Prince William SoundOne thousand feet over Prince William Sound, the plane tilted sideways, its left wing stretching toward the waves below as pilot Mike Collins circled in for a closer look. The water sparkled. “There’s a school of age one herring,” said Scott Pegau, turning in his seat, “right up against the beach.” Against the curve of the shore, a dark cloud formed below the surface of the Sound, where hundreds of juvenile herring clustered. Their school is among 1,227 counted so far this season along the islands and inlets off the Prince William Sound. Video, Read the rest here 11:24

(no comments yet) Comment

Man charged with operating charter boat service without proper licenses, could be fined up to $900, that’s it???

Officers boarded the Fishing Lady Saturday morning, June 20, as it was anchored off Sandy Point State Park, according to police. The vessel, a head boat that hailed from Stevensville, had about 30 paying customers aboard, NRP said. Head boats charge a per-person fee compared to charters that involve renting an entire boat. Last year, the Fishing Lady was part of an investigation by NRP and the Coast Guard of charter boat operations on Kent Island that resulted in several men being charged with illegal and unsafe practices, the statement said. Read the rest here 10:58

(no comments yet) Comment

Plenty of Fish in the Sea, But Red Tape Keeps Them There

Across the harbor, the famed Unicorn dragger, now rusted and unseaworthy, glowed in the sunlight, a reminder of brighter days for the Island fishing industry. The decay of the Unicorn, and that of her sister ship, the Quitsa Strider II (now gone), has little to do with a lack of fish, Mr. Brighton said. Instead, he said, the main struggle for fishermen these days involves the array of state and federal regulations and the ever-increasing costs associated with a way of life as old as the Island itself. “It’s because we lost our access to those fish,” Read the rest here 10:25

(no comments yet) Comment

Outer Banks fishermen reeling in half-eaten fish

The fishermen say strict shark fishing laws that went into effect years ago are part of the problem. Now, the sharks are overpopulated. All those sharks are now the fishermen’s competition. “Some sets we don’t get a fish back. We might catch 25 or 30 heads. Pieces where everything is gone. It’s literally costing thousands and thousands out of my pocket,” Hopkins said. Video, Read the rest here 09:48

1 comment Comment

Lobstermen play waiting game while early prices spike, And wait they must!

lobsterDM0811_468x521Maine’s lobster industry is gearing up for another big year as the state’s 4,500 commercial fishermen wait for lobsters to migrate to the coast and shed the hard shells they’ve been carrying all winter.  “The old saying is: ‘The weather gets better before the lobster catch does,’” he said. “It takes awhile for the water temperatures to warm up and for the lobsters to do their thing.” It all comes down to weather – not this weekend’s mostly sunny summer skies but the bitter cold of last winter that chilled the Gulf of Maine. Then a wave of storms in February mixed up the water column and drove those low temperatures at the surface down to lobster habitat at the bottom. Read the rest here

(no comments yet) Comment

Bristol Bay Fisheries Report, July 4, 2015

nakeen homepack, bbfr july 4 2015Coming up today, as the total run pushes past 10 million sockeye, Port Moller Test Fishery says the it’s  likely coming in smaller (a lot smaller) than predicted. ADF&G’s Travis Ellison is seeing a bump of fish to the Kvichak River, and author/painter/veteran Bristol Bay fisherman Dick Smith joins us for a conversation about the old days in the fishery, and his new book Bristol Bay Boy. The migration this year has been very odd. However, at this point we must consider the possibility of a smaller run. Listen to the report here 23:13

(no comments yet) Comment

Lobster levy regulations approved – New P.E.I. legislation sets out rules for collecting a levy for lobster marketing

The P.E.I. government has approved lobster marketing board regulations that will allow for a lobster levy to be collected next spring. The new legislation allows for the establishment of a board to administer the levy for the marketing of lobster, and to represent the interests of lobster fishermen provincially and nationally. The regulations require lobster fishermen to pay a levy of one cent per pound of lobster sold to buyers and authorizes the board to ensure that the levy is collected. Read the rest here 18:48

(no comments yet) Comment

“America’s Dunkirk” – The Roll of Mariners and Fishermen in the Battle of Brooklyn and Long Island, Ec Newellman

Last night I wrote a little story about the Battle of Brooklyn and Battle of Long Island during the Revolutionary War on another website and I just wanted to share my feelings about it here. The short story was on and about a battle that the American colonist did not win…especially when measured by what is usually won or lost in battles, land taken as seen upon a map…and for the most part, a good portion of NYC now laid in enemy control once again after the Battle of Brooklyn and Long Island for the British Empire. But we did win something, and that was due to an army regiment made up of mariners and fishermen from Marblehead Massachusetts who performed what a few historians have labeled as “America’s Dunkirk”….literally a sea based evacuation,,, Read the rest here 18:06

(no comments yet) Comment

NatureVest – When Dogs and Pigs Breed

earthjustice $upereco-manThe Nature Conservancy, the worlds largest ENGO, and JP Morgan the worlds largest bank have created  NatureVest, a multi billion dollar fund that essentially carry’s out Agenda 21 goals of removing humans from half of the planet, making a 25 % buffer zone at the edge. They do this by inserting themselves as a default governing mechanism for the wild lands that they acquired via debt a swap. They lend money to already broke nations and people, and when they can’t pay, they let the the loan go in exchange for rights to the best wild lands and fishing rights. Read about it here

(no comments yet) Comment

Saint John River sturgeon fishing season off to good start

Sturgeon fishing season began this week on the Saint John River and the early catches were good, according to one company. “We started amazingly,” said Cornel Ceapa, the owner of Acadian Sturgeon and Caviar. The company landed the biggest sturgeon it ever caught this week, a mighty creature weighing in at 300 pounds. Over the next couple of months, the company expects to catch 350 sturgeon and process everything in it from the bladders to the skin. However, the most profit is in caviar, with a 30-gram tin costing $75. Read the rest here 13:34

(no comments yet) Comment

Inland Fisheries: Lake Huron Commercial fishery moves to Harbor Beach coastal waters

We believe that there is a substantial and exploitable population of lake whitefish out there,” said DNR fisheries biologist Jim Baker. “The Canadians have been taking lake whitefish out there all these many years on their side of the lake and we suspect that we have been serving as a reservoir to supply their commercial fishery.”To judge its potential, the DNR partnered with state-licensed commercial fisherman Dana Serafin out of Pinconning to explore new fishing grounds for lake whitefish in the area. Read the rest here 12:47

(no comments yet) Comment

Bristol Bay fishermen hit the 2 million mark June 29 ,sockeye catch still climbing!

Bristol Bay fishermen hit the 2 million mark June 29. Baywide, the total catch was about 2.6 million sockeye as of June 29. If the projections are correct, that means there’s about 35 million sockeye still to be caught, and researchers have said they still expect the pre-season forecast to come to fruition. The Egegik harvest through June 29 was about 1.1 million reds, and the Nushagak catch was about 914,000. But fishermen in those districts said that fishing still felt slow. Read the rest here 09:17

(no comments yet) Comment

Independence Day

“I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.” 08:59

4 comments Comment

National Marine Fisheries Service commercial dolphin season closure forces Keys restaurants to import

Florida Keys restaurants are searching for other sources of mahi-mahi, after federal authorities brought an early closure to the island chain’s commercial dolphin season. In the Keys, mahi-mahi is the usual catch-of-the-day for sandwiches and entrees on most menus. Eateries will soon begin outsourcing the popular dinner fish, after the NOAA Fisheries last week closed the commercial dolphin season early for the first time on record. Any other mahi being served will most likely be imported from elsewhere in the Caribbean, and Central AmericaRead the rest here 19:53

(no comments yet) Comment

Little pockets of pus – Subsistence fishermen find possible infection in Yukon chum salmon

As yukon salmon continue their summer runs, subsistence fishermen continue to express frustration about gear restrictions, closures, and — now — potentially infected fish. When managers and fishermen met for their weekly teleconference on Tuesday, they heard reports of discoloration and pus in chum salmon. “Little pockets of pus when you fillet the fish that’ll be about the size of a pea or maybe a little smaller,” he said. “And I know that in warm water, which is what we have right now, ichthyophonus really grows rapidly if the fish is infected.” Read the rest here 19:20

(no comments yet) Comment

Maine lawmaker Rep. Robert Alley, D-Beals, will try again for scallop harvesting limit

A Maine legislator says he will try again next year to persuade the Legislature to limit the harvest on the state’s popular, meaty scallops. The fishing industry this year resisted a bill proposed by Rep. Robert Alley, D-Beals, and it later died in committee in April. He had proposed legislation to create a limit of 90 pounds a day per person on wild-caught Maine scallops so future generations, he said, would still be able to harvest them. Read the rest here 16:39

(no comments yet) Comment

Sheriff Allman speaks in Sacramento at ‘Fish, Flows and Marijuana Grows’

Allman opened by offering a subtitle to the Fish, Flows and Marijuana Grows named hearing. “Wildlife, Water and Weed, that’s what we’re seeing in Mendocino County,” he said.  “The amount of water being diverted is absolutely staggering,”  Assemblyman Jim Wood, D-Healdsburgsaid. “We need to get a handle on this.” “This industry has been in the shadows for a long time,” Hezekiah Allen, Emerald Growers Association said. “The war on drugs has not only failed us, but created this situation. This is commercial agriculture. Regulate this please. We would rather pay taxes than fines.” Read the rest here 14:41

(no comments yet) Comment

Fur seals taking over – penguins, pelicans, tuna and fish at risk

According to Mr Adrian Pederick MP, Liberal Member for Hammond , the New Zealand fur seals require immediate management in South Australia. “They are taking over and these fur seals will have an environmental impact in the future if they get down to the Southern Lagoon and Pelican Island and take out the pelican breeding grounds,” Mr Pederick said. “In essence we are saying to the Government, stop sitting on your hands and do something ,,, Read the rest here 14:09

(no comments yet) Comment

This is good! The truth about Atlantic salmon, Owen Myers, St. John’s

The Atlantic Salmon Federation (ASF) is an elitist mainland/foreign organization that is not the last word in Atlantic salmon conservation, much as they would like us to think otherwise. The board of directors is stacked with old political warhorses and looks like the Senate. Those guys are into catch and release on a helicopter-only river in Labrador out of sight of public scrutiny, and have gourmet meals in palatial surroundings. What the ASF is not saying is that conservation of our salmon will only be achieved when we force the Norwegians and their front men in salmon farming in this province to grow aquaculture salmon in on-land tanks. Read the rest here 10:01

(no comments yet) Comment

Good season for Northumberland lobster

As the wind came round to the southwest after a choppy morning on the water, Dan MacDougall smiled at a 71/2-pound lobster. “Look at the size of that fellow there,” said the Cribbons Point, Antigonish County fisherman, lifting the big crustacean. After two hard years, it’s been a good lobster season on the Northumberland Strait. The export of live lobsters to overseas markets continued to grow, and the slow rebound of the American economy, coupled with a late start to the Maine lobster fishery,,, Read the rest here 09:36

(no comments yet) Comment
Kerry Harrington holds the bill of the 300-pound swordfish

In Ocean City, these fishermen still hold tightly to the industry that shaped the town

The commercial harbor here was buzzing the way it rarely does anymore, the 50-foot Sea Born unloading more than 8,000 pounds of fish after a week at sea. The crew never seemed to stop moving — lifting barrels, shoveling mounds of ice into containers, weighing and grading the fish that sometimes ends up as sushi in New York City and even Japan. But the industry that started it all continues to gradually disappear. Capt. Kerry Harrington, 59, is one of only a handful of local commercial fishermen still holding on despite tighter regulations, rising expenses and shrinking quotas and territory. Read the rest here 08:54

(no comments yet) Comment

That Didn’t Take Long: North & South Carolina Shark Attacks Blamed on Global Warming

As one might have expected, from mainstream media’s let’s-see-what-we-can-blame-on-global-warming department comes the CBSNews article “Strange” spike in shark attacks puzzles experts.“The trend is normally zero or one attack in that area in any one year,” said Dr. Samuel Gruber, the director of the Bimini SharkLab. Theories as to why this is happening range from time of day, to bait fishing, sea turtle migration, lunar cycles and global warming.  Whose theories? WHAT ABOUT THE SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURES THERE? Read the rest here 07:58

(no comments yet) Comment

Virginia considers opening blue crab winter dredge fishery, would mean reducing daily bushel limits of hard pot crabbers

After closing the winter dredge fishery for Chesapeake blue crab for seven years straight to help the struggling stock rebuild, the state is inching closer toward reopening it this winter. The Crab Management Advisory Committee of the Virginia Marine Resources Commission (VMRC) voted overwhelmingly last week to recommend ending the closure — a move that actually puts the committee at odds with VMRC staff and its commissioner, who recommend keeping the ban in place. Read the rest here  07:23

(no comments yet) Comment

Louisiana shrimpers applaud new Turtle Extruder Law

Today is a monumental day for our shrimp industry and will show the world that Louisiana fishermen and processors have always been concerned with the successful management of our shrimp fishery,” said Mark Abraham, chairman of the Louisiana Shrimp Task Force, an advisory panel that includes representatives from the industry and state agencies that regulate it. “The Shrimp Task Force applauds Governor Jindal and our state legislators who worked with us to pass this legislation.” Read the rest here 21:07

(no comments yet) Comment

The Common Fisheries Policy: the destruction of the British fishing industry

eu destoyed britain, scottland fishing industryThis island nation has a proud fishing heritage going back many generations. By 1970 the fishing industries in England and Scotland were among the finest in the whole world. Britain was catching over a million tons of fish a year, and was in preparation to claim its international right to the resources of a 200 mile Exclusive Economic Zone around the whole British Isles as per the new law of the sea agreed by the United Nations in 1973. By the 70’s fishing ports were prosperous and the future of our fishing industry looked secure. Then Edward Heath surrendered out national sovereignty and ended centuries of independence when he joined the “Common Market” in 1973, the embryo of the European Union. Read the rest here 17:20

(no comments yet) Comment

ICES Advice on North Sea fishing quotas 2016 recommends increase on major stocks

increases recomended for North Sea fishermenThe International Council for Exploration of the Sea (ICES) has just published its catch quota recommendations on the Bay of Biscay (including the Iberian Coast), Celtic Seas and the Greater North Sea for 2016. These figures, based on scientific stock assessments, show significant increases for key species for 2016 with many stocks having shown clear signs of recovery. The scientific data presented reflects a positive long term trend of increasing fish populations and a reduction of fishing mortality across many areas. Read the rest here 15:04

(no comments yet) Comment

“Jaws” made great whites villains but great whites rebounding

“It’s a matter of relativity,” George Burgess said of the great white’s status. “There are in fact more today than there were 10 years ago.”“I don’t ever remember surfers and waders being bit like they are these days, because the commercial sharkers were thinning them down,” said Ron Rincones, a longtime fisherman and diver from Grant-Valkaria. “People are now being attacked. There’s a lot more people shark fishing these days on the surf, because there’s a lot more sharks.” Read the rest here 14:27

(no comments yet) Comment

Gulf states reach $18.7 billion settlement with BP over 2010 oil spill

The settlement announcement comes as a federal judge was preparing to rule on how much the British oil giant owed in federal Clean Water Act penalties after millions of gallons of oil spewed into the Gulf. BP was leasing the Deepwater Horizon rig in April 2010 when it exploded and sank off the coast of Louisiana, killing 11 crewmen and releasing some 200 million gallons of crude into the Gulf. Read the rest here 12:48

(no comments yet) Comment

Roger Frate of Darien has a simple answer to improving the lobster stock in Long Island Sound.

U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., and Roger Frate, owner of Darien Seafood MarketFrate said it was pesticide used to combat the West Nile Virus in 1998 and 1999 that decimated the Sound’s lobster population and sent it into a tailspin from which it has yet to recover.  Connecticut banned the use of some pesticides, but New York hasn’t, he said.  But Carlo said he’s noticed a rebound in the number of lobsters. “The lobsters right now are looking nice and healthy,” he said. “There’s been a huge improvement since 2012.”  However, Frate said fishermen still believe pesticides are harming lobsters. Read the rest here 12:20

(no comments yet) Comment

Help stop “catch shares” and more in the South Atlantic

council_fishing_headerLast year, the SAFMC promised that the Vision Project would be “stakeholder-driven” (click here, third paragraph) and conducted 26 “port meetings” that were supposed to seek stakeholder input into the project. These meetings produced overwhelming input from stakeholders, like you, that catch shares, vessel monitoring systems, and more closed areas like MPAs, are vehemently opposed, and should not be in the plan. Breaking its promise of a stakeholder-driven plan, the SAFMC has now included those overwhelmingly opposed measures in its Vision Project plan! Read the rest here 10:30

(no comments yet) Comment

Easy prey? Not anymore – “the onslaught of NGO and media prevarication” and Pope Francis

421238_367823369911134_2112714610_nFishermen, especially the small-scale ones, represent easy prey for groups driven and financed by powerful interests, who blame them for damaging the marine environment, whether or not that is actually happening. Some are supported by petro-chemical industries and large – often corporate – owners of industrial fishing fleets, with an increasing appetite for the inshore, coastal fishery resources accessible to and traditionally exploited by artisanal and other small-scale fishing people. Read the rest here 09:17

3 comments Comment

Florida FWC requests public feedback at workshops around the state

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is hosting several workshops across the state, including the two in the Florida Keys, to gather input and develop a better understanding of the public’s views on marine fisheries issues. Groups that might be interested in participating include commercial and recreational fishers, wholesale dealers, those in the tourism industry, fishing guides and divers, FWC spokeswoman Bekah Nelson said. Read the rest here 08:00

(no comments yet) Comment

Kenai River late run king salmon returns triggers restrictions in commercial setnet fishery

On the opening day of fishing for Kenai River late run king salmon Wednesday, Alaska Department of Fish and Game managers announced restrictions for the commercial setnet fishery that operates on the east side of Cook Inlet. For the second consecutive fishing season, restrictions in sport fishing for Kenai River king salmon have triggered automatic restrictions in the number of hours setnetters can fish. Read the rest here 07:32

(no comments yet) Comment

Inlet Fish Producers sold to North Pacific Seafoods, a subsidiary of the Japanese trading house Marubeni

Two Cook Inlet processing facilities will be added to a growing list of salmon production businesses owned by the Seattle-based North Pacific Seafoods. The acquisition, announced Tuesday, will add the Kenai and Kasilof plants currently owned by Inlet Fish Producers to the North Pacific Seafoods operates in Alaska. North Pacific Seafoods is a subsidiary of the Japanese trading house Marubeni and the deal cost the company about $8 million, according to the Japanese business and financial publication Nikkei Review Read the rest here 20:11

(no comments yet) Comment

I like this guy! Stephen Georgouras is selling Shark Fins from legally caught sharks

Cairns Ocean Products has been selling sun-dried shark fin, caught legally by local commercial fishermen, for the past two months, at $25.50/kg. In Queensland, fishers can cut the fins off sharks at sea, as long as they return to shore with an acceptable ratio of shark fins to shark meat. Cairns Ocean Products owner Stephen Georgouras said he was merely trying to onsell the product for local fishermen. “This business about sharks being endangered on our coastline here is unfounded.” Read the rest here 17:38

(no comments yet) Comment

HabCamV4 sees large numbers of young scallops off Delaware Bay

habcamv4sees“We’re seeing many swimming scallops and other behaviors that are providing insights into how the animals live and interact in that environment,” Hart said. “Baby scallops are seen attached to adults, and other scallops are swimming above the bottom, perhaps to diffuse to areas that are less dense and provide more room to grow.” The NEFSC’s annual sea scallop survey is conducted in three segments or “legs,” each ranging from 11 to 14 days, between May and July, beginning with the Mid-Atlantic Bight, then Southern New England and ending on Georges Bank. Read the rest here 15:10

(no comments yet) Comment

NOAA seeks to put observers on lobster vessels

Green Harbor MaLocal lobstermen are concerned increased observation by the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration through the will pose an unnecessary burden and result in potentially crippling regulations. Pete Mason, who works as a lobsterman in Marshfield, said boats already provide NOAA with the information it seeks, such as where they fish, what they catch and what they throw back. “It’s just kind of redundant,” he said. Officials from NOAA, however, say there’s been a misunderstanding. Misunderstanding??? BS! Read the rest here 14:02

1 comment Comment

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 47′ Steel Trawler – C-18 CAT Pullmaster Winches, (2) Net Reels, Stainless 21′ Fish Sorting Conveyor

dr3739_01Specifications, information and 23 photo’s click here  To see all the boats in this series, Click here 12:04

(no comments yet) Comment

Fisherman on Portuguese trawler Pascoal Atlantico medevaced to St. John’s

The Halifax maritime rescue centre says a 21-year-old man was sick onboard the Pascoal Atlantico trawler on Tuesday. The trawler, located about 540 kilometres east of St. John’s, was just inside the maximum range for a Cormorant helicopter. A Gander-based Cormorant was sent to the Grand Banks, and a crew was able to hoist the man aboard.  Read the rest here 11:26

(no comments yet) Comment