A knowledgable fisherman’s words fall on deaf ears – THERE’S SOMETHING WRONG WITH THE COD!

In response to John Gillett, Inshore fisherman from Twillingate, letter of December 8th, published in the telegram, “There’s something wrong with cod”. This is one of many he has written over the years, a very will spoken, and knowledgeable fisherman and sad to say his letters like many others have fallen on deaf ears. Although this Province has survived on the wealth of the ocean and is our hope for the future, we are unable to elect politicians, both Federal and Provincial, who are willing to try and get this great resource back on track so that the children of John Gillett and myself and others can have a bright future and stay in this Province. The fishery is in a mess and I don’t see any politician willing to take this on. (Ret) Capt. Wilfred Bartlett Green Bay South [email protected] 20:11

Fighting the ‘good enough’ syndrome How Iceland is turning fish into a luxury item

The members of Iceland’s Ocean Cluster House, an innovation incubator for start-up companies, are developing new business ideas from fish meat, oil, bones, intestines and skin. This September, government officials, educators and people involved in the Newfoundland and Labrador fishery visited the Ocean Cluster House to take notes on Iceland’s successful experiment. Their tour starts at the house’s public restaurant, “Bergsson,” where pillows are made from boat sails and pendant lights are cleverly fashioned from old buoys. Everywhere you look there are reminders of the fishery.  click here to read the story 18:28

Fishing boat skipper gets suspended sentence for running his vessel aground off Plymouth

Michael Kinnaird, had earlier pleaded guilty to the charges at Plymouth magistrates court on 6 December, which related to an incident on October. It was shortly after 8.45pm on 7 October 2017, that Mr Kinnaird’s vessel, a 21metre trawler FV Algrie left its moorings at Sutton Harbour. It then continued out of the harbour entrance but did not alter course into the shipping channel. Instead, the FV Algrie kept a steady course at seven knots before running aground at Mountbatten Breakwater. click here to read the story 15:05

Violations prompt Washington state to cancel Atlantic salmon farm lease at Port Angeles

Cooke Aquaculture Pacific has lost the lease for its Atlantic salmon net-pen farm in Port Angeles and must shut down and remove it, said Hilary Franz, state commissioner of public lands, who terminated Cooke’s lease. The farm, operated by a series of owners since 1984, currently holds nearly 700,000 Atlantic salmon. Franz said the Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR) would work with other state agencies to enforce an orderly shutdown and complete removal of the farm. Franz said her decision is final. “There is no room for negotiation.” click here to read the story 14:24

Imported Foods: There Is A Staggering Amount Of Feces In Our Food

Most Americans are eating significant amounts of feces on a regular basis without even realizing it. You might not mind this, but most people out there would not willingly eat feces if they could avoid it. Not only is it disgusting, but feces is also a breeding ground for all kinds of dangerous diseases. Unfortunately, as a result of the never ending quest to cut prices even lower more of our food is being imported from overseas than ever before.,,, If you are eating seafood that was imported from Asia, there is a very good chance that it was raised on pig feces. Not only that, the truth is that a lot of the poultry that comes from Southeast Asia is also raised on pig feces. click here to read the story 12:53

San Diego: Casinos launch all-you-can-compete lobster wars

The claws are coming out. Lobster claws, that is. The latest battleground in the San Diego area’s cutthroat casino industry is the buffet, where all-you-can-eat lobster has become the weapon of choice to lure customers. The luxury crustacean has joined swanky new hotels, spas and pool complexes as ammunition in an expansion arms race, where an estimated $1 billion is currently being spent to enlarge and upgrade six of the region’s 10 casinos. “A lot of casinos locally have been doing it,,, click here to read the story 12:18

Christmas tail: Europe deal could slow yuletide lobster biz

A trade deal between Canada and the European Union could amount to a lump of coal for the U.S. at Christmastime. The Christmas season is typically a busy time of year for American seafood exporters, as the type of lobster that is native to North America is popular in some European countries around the holiday. But Canada and the EU brokered a deal this year that gets rid of tariffs on Canadian lobster exports to the 28-nation bloc. Canada, the world’s other major lobstering nation, is now at an economic advantage over the U.S. Members of the U.S. lobster industry, which is based in New England, said exports to Europe have been pretty typical this year, but they’re worried about the future. click here to read the story 11:10

Study: Ocean noise may hinder fish mating

The party is noisy. The music and conversation drown out what you want to say. Welcome to the world of the cod, haddock and other fishwhere its considerably harder because its done in the dark, 160 feet below the ocean surface, where vital communication – essrtially “Here I am, over here!”- can be lost at the constant roar of ships passing overhead, An increasingly noisy ocean may mean fish are having a hard time finding one another to spawn and navigate, according to a new study by NOAA scientists and published last month in the online journal Scientific Reports by Nature.  click here to read the story 10:28

Fairhaven man, New Bedford father-daughter harvest the conch

A rugged and hearty soul, Bobby Sakwa of Fairhaven, a fixture at Hoppy’s Landing on the West Island Causeway, bears the character, weathered hands and ruddy face of a man who has eked out a living from the sea for a half a century. When he’s not lobstering from his 35-foot Novi, a timeless classic also bearing the scars of a vessel that has earned its keep on the ocean for 50 years, Bobby is running conch pots. George Smith, a native of Nova Scotia who owns Big G Seafood together with his daughter Heather Haggarty has been in the business of processing conch meat just shy of 40 years. Photo gallery, click here to read the story 08:40

Local Vietnam veteran honored by Sen. Reed with awards

More than four decades after the conclusion of the Vietnam War, one Narragansett native is finally being recognized for his service during the conflict. Paul Harvey was honored by U.S. Senator Jack Reed at his office in Cranston Friday, where he was presented the Purple Heart Medal with one Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster and the Silver Star Medal, the military’s third-highest personal declaration for valor in combat, among other awards.,,, he would go on to become a Newport-based commercial fisherman for 45 years, click here to read his story 17:53

Vote against fishing restrictions seen as win for RI, Galilee

At its meeting Tuesday, the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council voted 16-4 to discontinue a proposed squid buffer zone framework off the coast of Nantucket, Massachusetts, according to Meghan Lapp, fisheries liaison for Seafreeze Ltd “There were a good number of commercial fishermen, squid fishermen present. There were also a good number of people from Nantucket present. Basically everybody that wanted to speak got a chance to speak, and the council did the right thing,” she said. All members of the Narragansett Town Council had signed a letter Dec. 4 requesting the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council “reject further discussion of a buffer zone for the summer squid fishery off Nantucket.” click here to read the story 15:46

For the last two years, the most dramatic moments of the White Marlin Open have been on dry land

Phil Heasley caught the fish of his life, but the $2.8 million in tournament prize money got away. Heasley reeled in a 6-foot (1.8 meter) white marlin last year off Maryland’s coast. But in a sign of how concerned some big money tournaments are about cheating, officials made him and his crew take lie detector tests. The officials said all four men failed. Heasley is now in a protracted court battle over the winnings and his crew’s reputation, pitting their integrity against that of one of the world’s most lucrative angling contests. click here to read the story 13:42

Long Beach area crab meat percentage drops

The Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife completed third round of preseason Dungeness crab testing Dec. 14 in the Long Beach test stations only. This test collected both crab shell condition and meat recovery data. Results do not bode well for a Dec. 31 start to the season. This third test was conducted at the request of members of the coastal crab industry, to confirm the results of the second round of tests from this same area. click here to read the story 12:42

North Carolina Fisheries Association Weekly Update for December 15, 2017

Click here to read the Weekly Update, to read all the updates Click here, for older updates listed as NCFA click here12:01

Stay home or go fishing? Homer fishermen grapple with cod decline

Regulators voted to slash Gulf of Alaska Pacific cod allocations 80 percent earlier this month after a massive decline in stocks. That has fishermen and processors around the Gulf deciding what to do when the season kicks off on in January. “It’s going to be a big deal to a bunch of us. I’m guessing we’re going to be looking for stuff to do by the end of February at the latest,” Alray Carroll said.,, Once 2018’s total allowable catch of 13,000 metric tons has been landed, the season is over. click here to read the story 10:44

Pacific Ocean perch stock declared rebuilt

An important, though overfished groundfish stock has been declared rebuilt, the Pacific fishery Management Council announced Monday. Pacific Ocean perch has been an overfished stock since the mid 1960s when they were targeted by foreign fishing fleets, said John DeVore, groundfish staff officer for the Pacific fishery Management Council. This declaration will mainly be felt by the commercial trawl fishery north of Cape Mendocino, he said.  click here to read the story 10:18

Amid uncertain NAFTA future, lobster industry looks to other markets

President Donald Trump is known to be a steak kind of guy. But his threat to throw out the North American Free Trade Agreement is lending a whole new meaning to “surf and turf” for at least one lobster-processing plant in southwestern Nova Scotia. “Yes, we all watch the negotiations. Yes, we’re all concerned about what will happen,” said Robert MacDonald, president and general manager of Gidney Fisheries in Centreville, N.S. The U.S. is the largest consumer of lobster from the Maritimes, accounting for close to three-quarters of the roughly $2 billion this country exported in 2016, according to the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. click here to read the story 09:24

Trump Administration Facing Battle Over New England Marine Monument

“We will challenge in court any action to roll back the Coral Canyons and Seamounts monument and we expect to win,” said Priscilla Brooks, director of ocean conservation for the Boston-based Conservation Law Foundation. But Jon Williams, owner of the Atlantic Red Crab Company in New Bedford, Mass., said he and other commercial fishermen who have harvested crabs and deep sea lobsters from the Coral Canyons region for decades are delighted with the Trump administration’s proposal. click here to read the story 08:22

Bluefin tuna in P.E.I. are so hungry they no longer fear humans

Bobbing up and down on cold Atlantic waters, several fishermen toss scaly, silver mackerel overboard. It’s a delicious snack for a bluefin tuna — the largest species of tuna in the world, measuring more than six feet in length and weighing up to 1,600 pounds. The newcomer among them, a writer and ecologist, expects to spend the afternoon patiently waiting for a bite. Instead, the bluefin tuna here in North Lake, P.E.I. are so abundant and so hungry that within minutes their trademark yellow caudal finlets are circling the boat. click here to read the story 18:29

Lets meet and build a consensus to have Congress enact a U.S. Fisheries Bill – Sam Parisi

I am a retired fisherman and am very concerned about the fishing future for those who are still engaged in their chosen occupation, and want to devote my time to help protect the future of those that are still fishing. As you know we are faced with many obstacles. I thought we could together fix the problems but there are so many, and the problems continue increasing. From National Marine Monuments closures, forced monitoring costs on those that can’t afford them, allocation cut backs based on science no one has confidence in unless you work for the NOAA, and now a steady wave of industries that want to utilize our traditional fishing grounds along every coast line of the EEZ. click here to read the letter 15:48

Maine lobster council to keep funding marketing effort despite critics

Despite grumbling from lobster dealers, the state Lobster Advisory Council voted unanimously Thursday to continue funding the Maine Lobster Marketing Collaborative. The collaborative is about to begin the final year of its five-year mission to promote the state’s signature product. It wants the Legislature to renew its authorization, and its $2.2 million a year budget funded by surcharges on state-issued lobster licenses. But it needs the support of the people that its work is serving – the individual lobster zone councils and the Lobster Advisory Council that oversees it all. click here to read the story 13:29

Squid fishery proposed for Southeast as squid follow warmer waters to Alaska

Following warmer waters to Alaska, market squid may be here to stay and at least four Southeast fishermen think there’s enough here to begin catching and marketing them. A proposal to create a squid fishery in Southeast is slated for the Alaska Board of Fisheries meeting Jan. 11-23 in Sitka. If adopted, the board would work with fishermen and stakeholders to develop a purse seine fishery for market squid, which are already being caught in lucrative fisheries in California and Oregon. click here to read the story 12:40

Fisheries Work Group reacts to cod decline and quota reduction

The Gulf of Alaska is seeing a Pacific cod decline just a year after a disastrous pink salmon season, and it has Kodiak representatives looking at the next steps for the community. The North Pacific Fishery Management Council recently decided to reduce the Gulf of Alaska cod quota by 80 percent to compensate for the almost 70 percent decline. The feeling around the table at the Kodiak Fisheries Work Group meeting Wednesday night was that this could be another fishery disaster, as with the pink season in 2016, which earned a federal disaster designation. click here to read the story 12:07

Fish Processing Icon Pat Quinlan Has Passed Away

Pat Quinlan, the co-founder of Quinlan Brothers, has passed away. Quinlan was born in Red Head Cove on November, 1929 – the youngest of seven children in the family of Patrick and Alice Quinlan. Throughout Pat’s life, he received many accolades and awards within the local community. However, it was as owner, manager, president and CEO of Quinlan Brothers Limited that Pat left his mark on the fishing industry of Newfoundland and Labrador. click here to read the story 10:44

DFO says changes at St. John’s facility a result of disconcerting spring protests

Those measures are a direct result of (Richard) Gillett’s protest, which began on April 13, and an earlier protest on April 7 when a group of protesting fishermen kicked in a window at the building’s main entrance and stormed inside the building. Jan Woodford, regional director of communications with Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Newfoundland and Labrador Region, confirmed Thursday a new security review was conducted as a result of the protests. “Yes, this review was carried out in response to an incident at the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Centre during which protesters forcibly gained access to the building,” Woodford said. click here to read the story 10:01

Freeport fisherman to be sentenced for catching red snapper without commercial license

A Freeport man is set to be sentenced Friday in a Houston federal court for lying to federal agents about a massive and unauthorized red snapper haul last March. Jamal Marshall, 36, who was only licensed for recreational fishing, pleaded guilty on Aug. 24 for lying to federal agents about hundreds of fish he’d brought in. He had 488 red snapper and 154 vermilion snapper on board the vessel when stopped by officials, a gross violation of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) catch limits. The fish had a market value of $30,000. But Marshall also admitted he had sold $35,000 worth of fish to Houston-area restaurants. click here to read the story 09:21

“You’re going into our fishing grounds,” – Fishermen Demand Answers on Wind Power Plan

An effort by Deepwater Wind, the Rhode Island company that plans to construct the South Fork Wind Farm approximately 30 miles east of Montauk, to alleviate the concerns of skeptical fishermen over disruption or destruction of their livelihood took an incremental step forward when the company’s president and vice president of development addressed a standing-room-only crowd at East Hampton Town Hall on Monday. Concerns remain, however, with commercial fishermen demanding to see data that Deepwater Wind has promised but has yet to produce, along with assurances that they will be compensated for losses resulting from construction or operation of the wind farm. click here to read the story 08:08

Maine Harvester Enters Guilty Plea, Maine Dealers Sentenced for Illegally Trafficking American Eels

Yarann Im was sentenced to six months imprisonment and three years of supervised release and Thomas Choi was sentenced to six months in prison with a fine of $25,000 today for trafficking juvenile American eels (also called “elvers” or “glass eels”) in violation of the Lacey Act, following a hearing in federal district court in Portland, Maine. The sentence was announced by Acting Assistant Attorney General Jeffrey H. Wood for the Justice Department’s Environment and Natural Resources Division. This sentencing follows the entry of a guilty plea on December 12, 2017, by Albert Cray,,, click here to read the press release 18:51

Full Committee Markup on 15 Bills – Magnuson Stevens HR 200 Advances, But Not Without a Fight

House Natural Resources Committee on Wednesday advanced out of committee revisions to the Magnuson-Stevens Act (H.R. 200 (115)) governing marine fishing and management in federal waters. The law is intended to prevent overfishing, but several conservation groups and Democrats are critical of the way it was written. Only three out of 12 amendments to the bill passed, and the bill moved out of committee on a party-line vote, your host reports. Rep. Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.), who voted against it, called it a plan to “deregulate our oceans and fish everywhere until there’s nothing left.”   click here to read the story  Watch the hearing click here 15:30

Senate panel clears Trump’s nominee for NOAA

The Senate Commerce Committee voted Wednesday to move forward with the nomination of Barry Myers to be head of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The 14-13 vote, along party lines, puts Myers in a position for a vote in the full Senate. Myers was until recently the CEO of AccuWeather Inc., which he founded with his brother. The weather forecasting company provides products similar to some NOAA services such as the National Weather Service, leading to concerns among Democrats that Myers is unacceptably conflicted. click here to read the story 14:30