Washing up on the Florida Coast, Military Ordinance, Unexploded Bombs, Dumped in Gulf of Mexico

Texas A& M oceanographic researcher have reported that unexploded bombs and other military ordnance washing up on the Florida coast has brought more awareness U.S. government materials dumping decades ago in the Gulf of Mexico could pose serious threats. Millions of pounds of bombs and other types of ordnance are scattered over the Gulf of Mexico and also off the coasts of at least 16 states, from New Jersey to Hawaii. The bombs can get caught in fishermen’s nets as they trawl along the ocean seafloor, or wash up on shore such as last week near the Tampa area. Read the rest here 19:24

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With court date on ballot measure looming, Kenai setnetters ponder their future

This summer, just as they have done for generations, setnetters are working the shores of the western Kenai Peninsula, stringing out nets and hauling in hundreds of thousands of fish from the abundant sockeye salmon runs of Southcentral Alaska.  Last month, the Alaska Fisheries Conservation Alliance submitted 43,000 signatures to the Alaska Division of Elections to certify an initiative that would ban setnets in Alaska’s urban areas. If approved by voters, the initiative would outlaw setnets in the five designated urban areas of Alaska, including Valdez, Ketchikan, Fairbanks — and the Kenai Peninsula. Read the rest here 18:15

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Your Definition of Bycatch is Most Likely Incorrect

So why is this important? One reason it’s important is because when the world’s largest ocean conservation organization does not understand what bycatch even is, then we have a very big problem. When ocean conservation organizations do not understand what bycatch is, it can lead to scientifically flawed statistics published in reports such as “Wasted Catch” which only amplify the confusion by spreading misinformation about responsible U.S. fisheries to the mass general public. Read the rest here 16:59

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Field Hearing Highlights Draconian Rejection of Science, Local Stakeholder Input with National Park Service’s Plan for Biscayne Bay

Today, the House Committee on Natural Resources and the House Small Business Committee held a joint field hearing in Homestead, Florida, on the National Park Service’s (NPS) General Management Plan (GMP) for Biscayne National Park released in June 2015.  The GMP, which includes a Marine Reserve Zone (MRZ) that would be closed to all commercial and recreational fishing, conflicts with the position of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) and the recommendations of the park’s own stakeholder working group.  Read the rest here 16:06

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ASMFC Summer Meeting – August 4-6, 2015 – Alexandria, Virginia, Listen LIVE!

The ASMFC is holding it’s Summer meeting in Alexandria, Va. Issue’s: American Lobster Benchmark Stock Assessment Action, Jonah Crab Fishery Management Plan for Final Approval Final Action , Atlantic Striped Bass,  Atlantic Menhaden, and more. Click here to listen to the meeting live Click here to review the final agenda.

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Shrimp Season Anomaly: season interruption, low prices make tough year for Mississippi Fishermen

Mississippi fishermen remain intent on harvesting this year’s shrimp crop in the shallow waters of the Gulf of Mexico despite and restarted. Dave Burrage, Mississippi State University Extension professor of marine resources at the Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi, said the shrimp season first opened June 3, closed June 19 when shrimp were too small, and then reopened July 13. “This season has been an anomaly so far,” Burrage said. The Mississippi season opened with 310 boats this year, down from 368 boats on opening day in 2014. Read the rest here 12:43

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Would netters OK a flounder buyout?

During the run-up to a June 17 public hearing about southern flounder management, several members of the N.C. Marine Fisheries Commission asked that the meeting be held in Raleigh. Their chairman, Sammy Corbett, rejected their requests, and the meeting was held in New Bern. The reason for the request was that most of the public hearings the Commission holds are in the eastern part of the state, where commercial fishermen rule the roost (lmao!). So several Commission members wanted recreational anglers to have a better chance to speak. Read the rest here 12:12

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Shem Creek shrimpers grapple with impending life raft requirement

With an online effort to collect $30,000 to purchase life rafts for Shem Creek’s shrimpers stalled out around the $2500 mark.  Matthew Hooper of the USCG’s Charleston sector says he’s not aware of any Shem Creek boats equipped with life rafts; Shem Creek Fisheries estimates the rafts cost about $3000 each.According to Brunson, the fee represents another hardship for local shrimpers who’ve struggled to stay in business in the face of international competition; meager harvests and the demise of area processors. Read the rest here 11:16

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Coast Guard Highlights Importance of Marine Safety

Capt. Mike Bogan, left, and Chief Warrant Officer Christian WilsonCAPE MAY – Marine Safety is one of the U.S. Coast Guard’s important 11 statutory missions, and is the area where the Coast Guard interacts the most with commercial vessels. Coast Guard personnel work to ensure commercial vessel safety by inspecting vessels under construction, inspecting vessels in service, investigating marine casualties, and licensing professional mariners. Sector Delaware Bay and its marine inspectors play a pivotal role in this mission. Read the rest here 09:15

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Nunavut wins EU exemption for seal hunt

Nunavut sealskins now qualify for an exemption to the European Union’s ban on seal imports, the territorial government announced Friday. The EU has banned the import of seal products since 2009, but allows imports from hunts that certified as being conducted by indigenous people.  “This is an important step towards the recognition of sealing as a way of life for Inuit,” said Nunavut Environment Minister Johnny Mike in a release. “We must ensure that communities benefit in a tangible way from this positive development by continuing to promote the recovery of international seal markets.” Read the rest here 08:38

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Federal Fishery Disaster Aid Meeting to be held in Gloucester tonight

cashThe distribution of the nearly $33 million in federal groundfish disaster aid has moved through the first two phases — or bins, in the parlance of NOAA Fisheries NMFS and the respective state fisheries directors — in the past year-and-a-half. Tonight, the Gloucester Fishing Commission will take a stab at coming up with what it believes to be the best option for the nearly $7 million earmarked for Massachusetts. The meeting is set for 6 p.m. at Gloucester City Hall. Read the rest here 08:05

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American Samoa – Loss of purse seiners will be catastrophic

The Chairman of the Governor’s Fisheries Task Force, Solip Hong, says there will be catastrophic effects for the territory’s economy if the current fleet of US purse seiners pack up due to loss of fishing grounds in near waters. The purse seiners face a bleak future because of a drastic reduction in fishing days under the South Pacific Tuna Treaty in waters near Kiribati that the local purse seine fleet used to ply. Read the rest here 18:57

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28 quotes, facts and graphs from the new UN global use of shark products report

The United Nations Food and Agriculture organization just released “fisheries and agriculture technical paper number 590, the state of the global market for shark products”  Coauthored by legendary shark conservation researcher Shelley Clarke, this 196 page document is a comprehensive look at, um, the state of the global market for shark products. 18) “The United States of America is an important producer of sharks, a relatively large exporter and a minor importer of shark fins…Read the rest here 17:25

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BILOXI: Class of 2015 inducted into Maritime and Seafood Industry Museum’s Heritage Hall of Fame

Nicolas Rosario Hire examines his certificate as an inductee into the Maritime & Seafood Industry Museum's Heritage Hall of Fame.The number of inductees into the 2015 Maritime and Seafood Industry Museum’s Heritage Hall of Fame wasn’t as large as the first class, but you couldn’t tell by the number of people who showed up for the ceremony Saturday. As the organizers know, big names draw big families. “This is a house of love,” said Kim Ross Bush, board member and emcee. “This is a house that was built by the Gulf of Mexico, by the men, women and children who came here and plied the waters and built an industry that we will forever be known for.” Video, Read the rest here 16:54

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Rhode Island Fishermen’s Alliance Weekly Update, Aug 2, 2015

rifa2The Rhode Island Fishermen’s Alliance is dedicated to its mission of continuing to help create sustainable fisheries without putting licensed fishermen out of business.” Read the update here  To read all the updates, click here 11:47

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Three Lobster fishermen convicted of robbing lobster traps and possession of undersized lobsters sentenced

Three fishermen convicted of robbing lobster traps and possession of undersized lobsters in June stemming from their September 2011 arrest were banned from commercial lobster fishing for life and two of them were given prison time.  The captain of the Marathon-based commercial lobster fishing vessel Classy Lady, Nelson Rojas, was convicted of trap molesting, tampering, possession of undersized lobster and interference with a conservation officer, according to court records. Read the rest here 11:17

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Long hours, no breaks, tough competition … he loves being a lobsterman

FV-Blue-Moon-DennyI got to wondering if many commercial fisherman are left in Newport. You rarely see them now that the waterfront has been taken over by yachts. But it turns out about 30 commercial boats are still holding on. They’re mostly lobsterman and they park at the end of Long Wharf on the way to Goat Island on a big concrete piece of real estate called the State Pier #9. I went down and found one – Denny Ingram, 57, who’s been lobstering for 25 years. It’s hard work, long hours, and you don’t get rich so I began by asking why he’s still at it. Read the rest here (photo Newport Lobster Shack) 10:24

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Contentious – An experimental soft-shell clam farm in Georgetown aims to keep green crabs at bay and enrich diggers.

Marching across the clam flats near the head of Heal Eddy, you notice two things.mFirst, both the seafloor and the sea grass meadows on the shoreline are cratered with holes – the work of green crabs, the voracious crustaceans blamed for the widespread destruction of the state’s soft-shell clams. Then you see Chris Warner’s response: five long rows of what appear to be net-covered garden beds, some 70 patches in all, spread across the exposed ocean bottom at the mouth of a 300-foot-wide cove. But the project has been contentious here in Georgetown, Read the rest here 09:28

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F/V Returner: police divers find missing Pilbara trawler, one body

Police divers have located the missing trawler Returner and one body. The boat was located 20 kilometres north of Karratha Nickol Bay foreshore on Friday. The man’s body was recovered on Saturday and has been flown to Perth for formal identification. The families of the three missing men have been notified. Mason Carter, 26, Chad Fairley, 30, and 57-year-old Murray Turner failed to return to Point Samson near Karratha in their 13-metre prawn trawler on July 15. The men were all from the Geraldton area. Read the rest here 08:09

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Seismic surveying is non-threatening says President International Association of Geophysical Contractors Nikki Martin

Recent months have brought much discussion and debate about the effects of seismic surveying along the Atlantic Coast as the federal government has approved consideration of permits for seismic operations. Numerous allegations from non-governmental organizations (NGOs) assert that seismic surveys are harmful to marine life and threaten fishing and tourism.  These allegations are simply false. Read the rest here 19:50

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Trident Seafoods officially opens $40m East Coast plant, which is expected to employ 175 workers

tridentplant-265x300Seattle, Washington-based Trident Seafoods on Thursday officially opened the company’s $40 million value-added processing and research and development plant in Carrollton, Georgia, the company said. The plant comes as the company said it intends to grow business in the eastern United States. With an 88,000-square-foot manufacturing floor, 18,000 square feet of office space and 20,000 square feet of support area, the plant will produce seafood products cut from pollock, cod, salmon, halibut, tilapia, sole and mahi mahi. Read the rest here 13:31

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All (fisheries) models are wrong, but some are useful (to indigenous people)

computer modelsModels do a great job of distilling the essence of how an ecosystem might respond to external forces—such as fisheries—but only under the specific conditions that the modeller assumes to be true in the ‘world’ of the model. Sometimes these assumptions are well-grounded in reality. Sometimes they are blatant but necessary simplifications. Phil is a lively character, a fishery ecologist who runs the Ecosystem Science section of the Northwest Fisheries Science Center The cool thing about Phil, who I have met personally several times, is that he will tell you right off the bat that “models are bogus”. Read the rest here 12:44

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Judge throws out phone records in lobster boat arson case

The district attorney’s office is appealing a July 6 ruling by a judge who concluded that cellphone records obtained by investigators were taken without probable cause and thus cannot be used at an arson trial involving a boathouse and fishing vessel in Waldoboro. The ruling came in the arson case of James “Jamie” R. Simmons, 40, and Fredrick A. Campbell, 31, both of Friendship. The two men and Jeffrey Luce, 36, of Whitefield were indicted in September 2014 on arson charges after they allegedly set fire to a Quonset hut-style boathouse in Waldoboro as part of a dispute over fishing territory. Read the rest here 10:47

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SEASWAP: How to stop a whale of a thief

Linda Behnken, the Executive Director of the Alaska Longline Fisherman’s Association was joined by Tori O’Connell, the Research Director of the Sitka Sound Science Center, to provide an update on SEASWAP (The Southeast Alaska Sperm Whale Avoidance Project). As O’Connell explains, the project just secured $311,000 in funding from NOAA’s Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program,,  The avoidance network will tag whales in the Chatham Strait black cod fishery and give fisherman devices to communicate where the whales are located. Listen, Read the rest here 09:30

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F/V Ferrigno Boy crash in Ventura Harbor caused by loss of power

Ferrigno Boy lost controlA commercial fishing boat that crashed into the Ventura Harbor this week lost control, harbor officials said Friday. The crash was reported about 10:30 a.m. Wednesday at the Ventura Harbor Boatyard in the 1400 block of Spinnaker Drive after the 70-foot boat lost propulsion control while maneuvering in the harbor, authorities said. The squid boat struck the docks and a 35-ton Travelift pier, which will now be used to take boats to and from their work sites, officials said.  Read the rest here 09:09

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House bill seeks state approval of fishing closures

On the heels of the recent announcement to close more than 10,000 acres of Florida’s Biscayne National Park to fishing, a bipartisan bill was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives that would stop fishing closures from occurring. The Preserving Public Access to Public Waters Act would require the National Park Service and the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries to have approval from state fish and wildlife agencies before closing state waters to recreational or commercial fishing. Read the rest here 09:00

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Flounder cuts may be phased in following another questionable NOAA NESC stock assessment.

NOAA ScientistA widely attacked proposal to reduce summer flounder catches by 43 percent next year may be replaced by one that phases in the cutbacks over three years. Koeneke, who has suffered increasing restrictions over the years _ the minimum fish size going from 13 inches in 1985 to 18 inches today _ doesn’t accept the science. “I’m convinced they don’t know what they’re talking about. We see a lot of flounder. We raised the (size) limit and saved a lot of fish. It looks like it recovered and then the next year they say we have a problem,” said Koeneke. Read the rest here 08:29

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Fishermen clean up ‘ghost gear’ from Bay of Fundy

The started dragging the waters off the coast of Saint John and Deer Island seven years ago. More than 500 abandoned traps were hauled up from the bottom of the Bay of Fundy in 2008.  “There was concern that there was all this gear down there that was fishing and killing lobsters — could entangle whales. The gear is just fishing and fishing and killing indiscriminately,” said Maria Recchia, the association’s executive director. Read the rest here 08:08

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Digby DFO find short and berried lobster and unhailed halibut, clammers get hit also

In Parker’s Cove on July 21 they found 21 short lobster in a fisherman’s catch. At the Digby wharf on July 29, they found eight berried lobsters and three shorts in a fisherman’s catch. And on July 30, they found four shorts and one berried lobster in a fisherman’s catch in Parker’s Cove. DFO also seized a truck and all the fishing gear on a vessel at the Harbourville wharf, after they found a fisherman unloading halibut without a monitor. The DFO officers also seized 200 pounds of halibut which was sold at auction for $1,593. They also seized another,,, Read the rest here

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Local Authorities Should Help With Fisheries Enforcement

Now, all of this talk about sea bass, scup, and surf clams got me thinking about striped bass, and I cannot remember for the life of me when the last time an article was written in a Cape Cod paper about illegal possession of stripers, both in terms of bag limit or minimum size, by either recreational or commercial anglers. It’s pretty well known that schools of striped bass are regularly encountered on the tuna grounds east of Chatham and on Stellwagen Bank, and there is a vocal group of anglers who believe that the prohibition on fishing,,, Read the rest here 15:47

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The Real Story behind Canada’s Murder for Lobster Case

Two years ago, in a small Nova Scotian village, a local troublemaker and lobster thief went missing, and three lobstermen eventually confessed to his vicious murder. Had this trickster finally gotten what was coming to him, or was the real story — and what it said about its community — something much more tragic? On the morning of June 1, 2013, Venard Samson motored across the mouth of Petit-de-Grat Harbour in a small fishing boat. The narrow harbor, off the southeastern coast of Nova Scotia, is wedged between Petit-de-Grat Island, where he lives, Read the rest here 15:18

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Boat crash damages pier, docks at Ventura Harbor

fishing vessel named Ferrigno Boy dock crash ventura harborMultiple docks and a pier at the Ventura Harbor were damaged Wednesday in a boat crash, the Ventura Harbor Patrol said. The patrol received many reports about the accident about 10:30 a.m. at the Ventura Harbor Boatyard in the 1400 block of Spinnaker Drive, authorities said. A 70-foot commercial fishing vessel named , a squid boat out of Los Angeles, damaged the pier, docks and utilities so significantly that the area was determined unsafe and it was taped off, officials said. Read the rest here 11:11

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A Dragger and Her Captain, Soon to Part Ways

Greg Mayhew aboard Unicorn Thursday afternoon. Captain Greg Mayhew recently sold the ship’s groundfish permit — the last on the Vineyard — to The Nature Conservancy, which has partnered with the Martha’s Vineyard Fishermen’s Preservation Trust to help keep the groundfish quota in the community. Without any federal or state permits, however, the old dragger is likely nearing the end of her long residency in the harbor. Several generations of the Mayhew family have fished the waters around the Vineyard. Mr. Mayhew’s great-grandfather would sail out of Menemsha in a catboat to harpoon swordfish. Read the rest here 10:51

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Maryland DNR forms position to give more voice to seafood industry

Former Queen Anne’s County commissioner and waterman George O’Donnell has been brought onto the Department of Natural Resources’ payroll as a seafood industry and fisheries stakeholders liaison, of sorts. O’Donnell has been in the position since July 8, and according to Maryland Watermen’s Association President Robert T. Brown, he’s already been working with the commercial industry to find solutions to their issues. “We’ve finally got a friend up there,” Brown said. Read the rest here 10:26

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Willapa Bay plan cuts Chinook production by one-third

The production of hatchery Chinook in Willapa Bay will decrease by more than one-third as a result of a policy adopted recently by the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission. The policy, adopted in June, also is likely to decrease the number of fish commercial fishermen can catch if the commission’s action survives a legal challenge. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife officials have said that they needed to adopt the new policy to avoid having the Chinook listed under the federal Endangered Species Act. Read the rest here 10:14

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Barge accident dents wind farm foundation off Rhode Island

First, it was the weather. Rough seas forced the Providence company to push back until last Sunday the installation of the first steel foundation for the five-turbine wind farm off Block Island. Now, Deepwater is dealing with a construction mishap. Earlier this week, one of the barges being used in the project hit the latticework “jacket” foundation that had been placed in the water and dented one of its four hollow, tubular legs.,, a previously-scheduled boat tour on Monday of the project site for U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, Gov. Raimondo and other elected leaders and state officials to marvel this engineering feat! Read the rest here 09:45

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Lessons from ‘the last clam’: Casco Bay shellfish ‘renaissance’

Tim Johnson of Harpswell had been clamming for more than 30 years when, in 2014, he hung up his hoe. Between predators such as the invasive green crab and other factors, the flats just weren’t profitable any more. “We’d go out, and there’s nothing there,” Johnson of Brunswick said. “It’s kind of depressing to dig the last clam.” In fact, the legal amount of softshell clams being harvested are down 70 percent since the green crab invasion of recent years, Brunswick Marine Resources Officer Dan Devereaux said — though he said the invasive crustaceans seem,,, Read the rest here 09:08

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Seafood industry backs Catholic Charities North Fishing Community Fund

More than 30 companies and individuals combined to donate more than $35,000 to Catholic Charities North Fishing Community Fund. Boston-based Sailors’ Snug Harbor foundation made the largest donation — $10,000 to the fishing community fund. Other major donors included American Seafoods, Arista Industries, Bama Seafoods Products, CB Richard Ellis, Elite Seafood, Espersen, High Liner Foods, Harbor Seafoods, Ipswich Shellfish, Northern Ocean Marine, Proteus Industries, Mark Leslie and William Canty. Other contributors include American Refrigeration, Eastern Fish, GE Foundation, H&M Bay, Label Print America, Polar Seafood, Preferred Freezer Services and Santander Bank. Read the rest here 08:21

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Iceland blasts Arctic Five for exclusion from fishing agreement

Iceland says the recent Arctic fishing moratorium, signed by the five Arctic coastal states without Iceland’s participation, is “unacceptable” and a worrying precedent. “We have been able to have good cooperation between the eight (circumpolar) countries and it has been a success — until now,” said Gunnar Bragi Sveinsson, Iceland’s minister for foreign affairs and external trade, in an interview with Radio Canada International’s Eye on the Arctic this week. Read the rest here 07:50
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Chatham-Kent’s amazing fishing economy sometimes overlooked

carol anne IIThere are currently 16 fish processors located in various regions throughout Ontario. Here in Chatham-Kent, we have three of them, so we are well represented. The economic impacts of Lake Erie’s commercial fishing sector are significant. For the fishing sector on Lake Erie, they account for over 700 direct and indirect jobs with a GDP of over $28 million. The Lake Erie fish processing sector accounts for close to 800 direct and indirect jobs, with a GDP of over $77 million. Read the rest here 19:49

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Retrieving crab pots off the coast of Alaska.

Making the Seas Safer for Fishermen

After Congress passed the 2010 Coast Guard Authorization Act, which updated fishing industry safety standards for the first time since 1988, activists like Bartlett were grateful their concerns were being taken seriously: Life rafts would be improved, safety training would become mandatory for fishing captains, and new boats would be built to standards set and verified by independent third parties called “class societies.” But almost five years after the law’s passage, the Coast Guard has yet to translate many of its requirements into enforceable rules. Read the rest here 17:57

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How And When Some Seafood Is Mislabeled And Mistreated

In reporting our inaugural episode of Food Crimes, we began to suspect that maybe our only hope for ever eating seafood worry-free again was to either begin a direct relationship with a fisherman or to become fishermen ourselves. This graphic—the result of a great many sources deep inside the seafood industry—confirms it. See the graphic here 16:24

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Bristol Bay fisherman’s lot: Either too few sockeye, or too many

Bristol Bay reds run by their own clock“Lots of cotton, lots of fish!” That’s the old Bristol Bay, residents say. We could scoff at these old sayings, thinking “What in the world is the relationship of Alaska wild cotton to the sockeye run?” There should be no kinship between these two, but I still felt a little unease upon departing the jet in King Salmon and seeing almost no cotton on the drive to Naknek. The wild cotton never materialized this season. The red salmon did, though they were late enough to make even the most seasoned fishermen a little nervous. Read the rest here 15:51

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Oceana again sues NMFS over bycatch monitoring

Oceana again sued NOAA Fisheries NMFS nmfs_logoon Wednesday, claiming the current bycatch reporting rule finalized last month for the region — in part, as a response to Oceana’s earlier legal victory — is underfunded, uniformly inadequate for providing accurate information and in violation of the Magnuson-Stevens Act and the Administrative Procedure Act. The 43-page lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Washington D.C., claims the new bycatch rule “leaves loopholes that would guarantee that observer coverage will never meet its performance standards,,, Read the rest here 15:15

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Consolidation: Greg Fulcher buys scallop vessel, permit from Oceans Fleet for $7m

alaskaNewport News, Virginia-based vessel operator Greg Fulcher has bought a scallop boat and license from Oceans Fleet Fisheries for $7 million, in the latest example of big money being spent in the US sector. At 92.1 feet long 171 metric tons gross tonnage, the Alaska was the largest vessel in the New Bedford, Massachusetts-based company’s fleet of 19 — now 18. “I also bought the Mistress last month, which is a part-time scallop boat. I bought it from Mistress Fishing Corp. out of [Massachusetts], with the help of [shipbrokers] Athearn Marine Agency,” he said. Read the rest here 14:36:03

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Guernsey fishermen banned from EU and UK waters

The Fisheries Management Agreement means all commercial fishing within the Bailiwick’s 12 nautical miles (nm) has to be licensed. It also means Bailiwick vessels need licences to fish in EU and UK waters. However, the lack of a quota policy has led to the UK suspending licences held by Bailiwick vessels from Saturday. This decision does not prevent any Bailiwick fishermen from continuing to fish in local waters in accordance with their licences, but does prevent Bailiwick vessels from fishing in EU waters, which includes those of the UK. Read the rest here 12:16

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First Nations tribal council suspends Okanagan sockeye salmon fishery

The tribal council representing eight First Nation communities in British Columbia’s Okanagan has suspended the area’s recreational and commercial sockeye salmon fishery – and says a full closing of food fishing is likely coming – as the salmon run comes in far lower than expected. The Okanagan Nation Alliance was set to open the fishery on Osoyoos Lake this weekend with a historic salmon run forecast for the Columbia River system. But only about 18,000 to 45,000 of the projected 375,000 fish are expected to survive the journey. Read the rest here 10:17

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Is This Seafood Commercial Really Blasphemous?

Legal-Seafood-AdQuiz: Are these tag lines from Comedy Central, a commercial ad campaign or the church on your corner? “Moses split the Red Sea. We split lobster tails and drizzle melted butter on them.” “In our book, gluttony isn’t a sin, it’s a commandment.” “Presbyterians will give you a sermon. Pescatarians will give you a salmon.” Ding! Ding! Ding! If you said ad campaign, you may be one of the people laughing at the 30-second TV commercials now running in Boston, Read the rest here 09:16

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Susanne Altenburger’s Green ‘Boat in a crate’ takes to the water

green boat Susanne AltenburgerA newly built 39-foot boat that fits neatly into a 40-foot shipping container has been making a splash on its maiden voyages in Gloucester Harbor in recent weeks. At the helm is Susanne Altenburger, Gloucester boat-designer , who put in about two-thirds of the man-hours it took to build the boat. The boat design took shape after the U.S. Navy had talked to Altenburger and her late husband, Phil Bolger, about creating a prototype of a versatile boat. Read the rest here 08:14

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Cold Smoked Salmon Recalled for Listeria in CA

The California Department of Public Health is reporting that cold smoked salmon is being recalled for possible Listeria monocytogenes contamination. There is no word on whether or not any illnesses have been reported. Illnesses caused by this bacteria can take up to 70 days to appear. The recalled products are Cold Smoked Salmon Deli Trays and Cold Smoked Salmon Trim produced by Certified Smoked Fish of Gardena, California. Read the rest here 08:01

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Fisherman gets ten days in jail for firing rifle in the Dillingham Boat Harbor

50-year-old Morris Bernard Lopez fired off his rifle several times from the deck of the fishing vessel from the deck of the fishing vessel Sandra Marie while it was tied up in the Dillingham Boat Harbor last Saturday.  Others nearby called police, and the first officer on the scene ordered everyone off the boat. Lopez appeared drunk to the officer, who requested a search warrant to retrieve the gun, spent shell casings, and what turned out to be four empty bottles of vodka. Lopez said he was just getting ready for hunting season. Read the rest here 20:11

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Biologists hope chinook salmon’s rebound will continue

The number of chinook salmon entering the Yukon has met minimum targets for the second year in a row. This year, 57,000 fish have been counted in the Yukon River at Eagle, Alaska, just above the target of 55,000. Biologists the number is somewhat encouraging, but say the problem of declining chinook has not been solved. This year’s number still pales in comparison to average run sizes in the 1990s which measured 150,000 fish. Pauline Frost, chair of the Yukon Salmon Sub-Committee, says a ban on salmon harvesting in Alaska has made a difference. Read the rest here 17:59

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Judge rules Cape Breton crab quota case should proceed to trial – trial is required to resolve the dispute

A paul fraser 4 justice has denied a New Waterford’s man claim for a summary judgment on a disputed crab quota licence. Paul Fraser had petitioned the court to grant his application seeking compensation for the sale of the quota and to transfer the quota to another licence holder. As noted by Justice Robin Gogan in her decision, the purpose and objective of a summary judgement is to end claims or defences that have no real prospect of success. She said a trial is required to resolve the dispute. Read the rest here 17:17

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Captains face charges after alleged illegal harvest

Two fishing boat captains are facing criminal charges after state environmental police say they caught the men harvesting surf clams in an area off Herring Cove Beach where fishing for the bivalves is prohibited. Matthews Collins, 29, of New Bedford, is scheduled to be arraigned today in Orleans District Court for allegedly harvesting surf clams onboard the F/V Aimee Marie on March 24,, The captain of the F/V Miss Maegan, Keith Opozda, 31, will also be summonsed to court to face a charge of harvesting surf clams shoreward of the 12-foot depth contour line at the same time as Collins, Read the rest here 15:55

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Angler lands 1,368-pound blue marlin from 21-foot boat; just shy of world record

An angler fishing off Kona, Hawaii, landed a 1,368-pound blue marlin on Tuesday, while fishing aboard a 21-foot skiff. The massive billfish, caught by Guy Kitaoka aboard the vessel Dayna, is the largest blue marlin caught off Kona in 23 years, and is only eight pounds shy of the world record, a 1,376-pound blue caught off Kona in 1982. However, Kitaoka was using an electric reel, so even if the fish had been nine pounds heavier, it could not have qualified as a world record. (The angler holds a commercial-fishing license and was fishing for tuna and billfish to sell,,, Read the rest here 15:12

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Sockeye face ‘catastrophic’ collapse in South Okanagan

A potentially catastrophic collapse of the sockeye salmon run is unfolding on the Columbia River system this year. Scientists once predicted that about 100,000 sockeye would return to spawning grounds in the rivers and streams in British Columbia’s South Okanagan region. In fact, it was supposed to be one of the largest sockeye runs in recent history, said Okanagan Nation Alliance fish biologist Richard Bussanich. Read the rest here 14:51

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Bodies of missing fishermen found in Brazos River

uscg-logoThe Coast Guard and local agencies have located the bodies of Phillip and Brandon Orr, Wednesday. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department search crews located Brandon at approximately 10 a.m. near the intersection with the Intracoastal Waterway. Coast Guard and Brazoria County Rescue crews found Phillip at about 11 a.m. in the same area, which was about a mile down river from where the boat was located Tuesday morning. link 14:25

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New marketing plan targets chefs to sell lobster by promoting “new shell lobster.”

The goal of a new marketing and promotion effort is to have those tourists also eat Maine lobster in their home cities. The Maine Lobster Marketing Collaborative is leading the effort and was formed by the state and the industry. It is paid for by increased license fees on fishermen and dealers.The promotional target, at least to start, is out of state restaurants. Collaborative executive director Matt Jacobson said research identified 2,200 “upscale casual restaurants” between Maine and Delaware, which are considered the focus for the marketing effort. Video, Read the rest here,14:15

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Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 68.5′ Steel Trawler – Detroit 12-V-71 Diesel, John Deere – 65 KW Genset

dr3944_01Specifications, information and 29 photo’s click here  To see all the boats in this series, Click here 12:51

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Next Year Will Be Awful Or Very Awful For Fluke Fisherman

Unless regulators provide a less abrupt alternative, the amount of fluke caught by Fluke Summer Flounder could be nearly cut in half by next year — a sudden drop that might seriously wound the charter fishing fleet in Sheepshead Bay. Captain Anthony DiLernia, one of New York’s representatives in the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council, said lower-than-expected fluke stocks found during the fish population surveys will require slashing quotas by as much as 45 percent next season. However, DiLernia said the council is considering,,, Read the rest here 12:19

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