The Fish Wife Life – What’s the fishing life like for the wives left behind?

A fisherman’s life is a wonderful life, but what about for the fisherman’s wives? Fish Radio asked some of Kodiak’s wive’s what their likes and dislikes are being married to a fisherman. I guess my likes would be you know it’s always nice when the leave and its always nice when the come home. It’s the best of both worlds. It’s hard being a single parent all the time. When you never know when they are coming home and when they come home they still have boat work, it’s not like they come home and don’t have work to do or they are done working. Audio, Read the rest here 16:43

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NOAA: $9M for projects to mitigate climate change threats! Nothing for observer coverage though.

NOAA ScientistThe National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is offering $9 million in grants to help coastal communities deal with extreme weather, changing ocean conditions and climate hazards. The NOAA National Ocean Service is providing $5 million through its Regional Coastal Resilience Grant Program and NOAA Fisheries NMFS is providing the rest through the Coastal Ecosystem Resiliency Grants Program. (They sure know how to waste money!) Read the rest here 16:19

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DREDGEMASTER: The World First Wireless Monitoring System for Scallop Dredges.

Notus Electronic Ltd. (Notus) has been supplying wireless sensors to the commercial fishing industry for 22 years. Notus has just released the Dredgemaster, a wireless sensor system for monitoring the warp length, pith angle and roll angle of a scallop dredge. The system was developed by working with scallop vessels in the US where increases of 22% were seen in catch rates. Read the rest here 14:03

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This should bother you – Antarctica Advisors LLC, We expect that this transaction (Daybrook) will fuel further North American and cross-border consolidation

wogangsterumdieeckeknallen-hauptfotoRead this. Two three times. Let it sink in. Ignacio Kleiman –  “This is a great transaction for both our client, Oceana Group, and the sellers. The Oceana management team is world-class and will continue with the long-standing tradition of excellence Daybrook is known for. As for the global Seafood Industry, it is a game changer, due to the transaction size and strategic importance. We expect that this transaction will fuel further North American and cross-border consolidation, and Antarctica’s highly-specialized Seafood Team will continue to play a leading role for the benefit of our clients.” Read the rest here 11:24

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Longliner concept hooked state agency for $2 million in 1980s

seabank longlinerI cannot remember which Rockland city councilor it was. In exasperation, he said, “All you have to do is to show up with a suit and shiny shoes and you can get money out of anyone in Maine.” A Harvard degree never hurts. Snelling Brainard was one of those. The Harvard-educated investor developed a concept that was going to revolutionize national, then international fishing. His SeaBank Corporation formed in 1986 was to develop “longliners,” a Scandinavian concept which would replace the traditional dragger nets with a 30-mile-long,,, Read the rest here 09:26

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‘Now I’m at half what I’d normally be at.’ Cod restriction’s rip the charter fleet

charter, cod restrictions, yankee freedomIt isn’t just the Northeast commercial groundfishing fleet that is struggling under the weight of the more restrictive federal fishing regulations that have completely taken cod off the table in the Gulf of Maine. The tendrils of those new regulations have reached the charter and for-hire fishing operators, who now try to combat both the reality — no cod — and the perception — no other groundfish species is worth the time and expense of a charter trip that have been generated by increasingly restrictive regulations instituted for the 2015 fishing season. Read the rest here 08:50

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The Sea Level Scam

Measuring sea level is more complicated than pounding a stake into a beach. Sea level and the rate of rise or fall are subject to daily and seasonal variations, storm surges, and effects from decadal to multi-decadal oscillations such as El Niño. For instance, the west-blowing equatorial trade winds can pile up an extra foot of water in the western Pacific compared to the eastern Pacific. There are also tectonic events: is the ocean rising or is the land sinking? Pumping groundwater causes soil compaction and hence sinking land. Another complication: isostatic rebound of North America is tipping the northeast coast into the sea. Read the rest here 13:24

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Man will bring fake orca to Astoria to try to scare off sea lions on docks, “I just put two and two together”

A fake orca is headed for the Port of Astoria next month — in yet another attempt to scare off hundreds of sea lions that have been lounging on the docks, preventing boaters from using them. The 32-foot-long fiberglass orca was suggested as a deterrent worth trying by its owner, Terry Buzzard of Bellingham, Washington. The 73-year-old built the fake killer whale about 12 years ago to pull along in parades to promote his business, Island Mariner Whale Watching Cruises. But when a friend recently shared photos of the California sea lions,,, Read the rest here 11:54

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Fishermen and farmers fight over water in California

Farmers are preparing for state-ordered cuts in water use to take effect this week. They are expected to affect agriculture and people in the watershed of the San Joaquin River, which runs from the Sierra Nevada Mountains to San Francisco Bay. It’s a primary source for farms and communities. There are already battles over who’s using too much water. PAUL SOLMAN: California salmon are under siege these days, and not just from bears hungry for heart-healthy fatty acids. MIKE HUDSON, Small Boat Commercial Salmon Fishermen’s Association: Last year, all our wild spawning salmon have died. Video, read the rest here 10:53

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Rhode Island Fishermen’s Alliance Weekly Update, May 24, 2015

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The Rhode Island Fishermen’s Alliance is dedicated to its mission of continuing to help create sustainable fisheries without putting licensed fishermen out of business.” Read the update here  To read all the updates, click here 09:49

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Seismic testing off NJ coast close to start despite opposition

A Rutgers University professor is going full speed ahead with a seismic study of the ocean floor, despite flags raised by oppositional legislatures, a state agency and environmentalists. Legislatures went above him Friday and appealed to Rutgers University President Robert Barch urging him to stop the study that could begin in June. “I don’t understand the rancor that has developed. I’m doing basic research of sea level history. We’re trying to preserve our coastline by understanding how it behaves during sea level rise,” Mountain said. Read the rest here 09:27

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A great migration is under way – Spring brings fish by the millions to Chesapeake Bay

Tourists aren’t the only ones flocking to our waters this time of year. A great migration is under way beneath the surface, too. Triggered by warming seas, hidden by tea-colored waves, propelled by the hunt for food and sheltered nursery grounds, all sorts of creatures are swimming or crawling their way up from the south. Their destination: the Chesapeake Bay. In the winter, only 30 or so aquatic species ply the bay. In the summer, that number explodes beyond 250.The catch flooding into the Lynnhaven Fishing Company tells the tale of the seasonal commute, Read the rest here 08:56

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A setnetting family on Amook Island – the seasonal migration

setnetting family on amook islandPeter’s parents have spent the last 43 seasons salmon fishing here. In a doorway of the old cabin at their site, I can trace Peter’s penciled growth through all the summers of his childhood. Going back to the cabin each May is a way of marking time. For 35 years, Jan and Pete senior shared a 24’x24’ cabin and an outhouse with the crew. Now they have a house, with indoor plumbing. Solar panels have quieted the droning of generators running for hours. Read the rest here 08:41

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Susanne Altenburger — The only way out that’s left, Combining groundfish ecology with fleet economics

unloading crab, new bedfordYou’d figure that this is just another colorful waterfront tale, here of improbable schemes hatched by folks of grand ambitions fiercely pursuing 50 percent visions — to never quite succeed, despite rich claims of “institutional authority,” “legitimate interest-representation,” defining “industrial policies” under whatever fractured grasp of “ecology.” And it would be a fine yarn, indeed — had not our Resource-Ecology and our Fleet-&-Port Economics been damaged to the great cost to businesses, too many families, our communities. Read the rest here 08:18

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Father passes down the fishing tradition

Keith Bruno loves commercial fishing and crabbing, but he hesitates when it comes to suggesting the same occupation to his sons, Zach and Ben. “It’s certainly not for everybody and being harder every day and more regulation all the time, I probably hope that they don’t get into this,” said Bruno, owner of Endurance Seafood at Oriental. “I fish because I love it and at this point in my life I really don’t know what else I can do.” Read the rest here 21:41

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Congressman Schrader to host town hall meeting on sea lions

Oregon Congressman Kurt Schrader will host a town hall meeting at noon Saturday, May 30, in Clackamette Park, Oregon City. Schrader is a co-sponsor of a bill in Congress to relax controls on marine mammals and address the growing threat to salmon, steelhead and sturgeon. While many of the thousands assembled in the Columbia River estuary in Astoria have departed, thousands remain. Read the rest here 16:19

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Coast Guard assists sinking fishing vessel 130 miles east of Nantucket

uscg-logoThe Coast Guard is responding to a fishing boat taking on water 130 miles east of Nantucket, Massachusetts, Saturday. At about 12:45 a.m., the fishing vessel Athena’s crew reported to Coast Guard Sector Southeastern New England watchstanders in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, that the Miss Shauna, a 51-foot fishing boat with seven people aboard, was taking on water through a hole in the boat’s engine room. Read the rest here 13:53

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California oil spill harder to clean up in choppy waters

A 10-square-mile oil slick off the California coast is thinner than a coat of paint and it’s becoming harder to skim from choppy waters, officials said as more dead animals were discovered. The combination of sunlight and waves Friday helped evaporate and dissolve some of the oil that blackened beaches and covered wildlife in thick goo after a pipeline on shore leaked up to 105,000 gallons on the Santa Barbara coast Tuesday. Photo’s, Read the rest here 11:02

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Hibernia faces charges following oil leak from offshore platform

ST. JOHN’S, N.L. – Newfoundland and Labrador’s offshore energy regulator announced Friday that it has laid charges in connection to a 2013 crude oil spill from the Hibernia platform. The Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board says the Hibernia Management and Development Company faces four charges in relation to the spill. At the time, the company said no wildlife was seen in the affected area. not mentioning its the bottom of the ocean! Read the rest here 10:17

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Getting Screwed – Fish plant workers wonder if OCI can live up to employment promises

Fish plant workers on Newfoundland’s Burin Peninsula say they’re not confident in assurances about jobs and are questioning whether their employer is living up to promises it made. The fish plant in Marystown is currently being demolished after Ocean Choice International (OCI) shut it down in 2011. For Allan Moulton, who worked at the plant for 42 years, it’s a heartbreaking sight. Read the rest here 09:53

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Northeast fishermen call for outside review of fish stock assessments

The battle over the validity of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration fish stock assessments that continually have led to slashed groundfish quotas has reached a higher pitch, with mounting calls for a third-party assessment of the manner NOAA assesses fish stocks. Under questioning by Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-New Hampshire, on Wednesday, NOAA administrator Kathryn Sullivan defended the accuracy of the agency’s fish stock assessments,,, (laughing now!) Read the rest here  09:06

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Brains vs prawn: the trawlers who put the shrimps on our barbies

ON A BALMY moonless night, prawn fisherman Kim Justice, 61, pilots the Coral J from Wallaroo to the night’s fishing grounds in Spencer Gulf. As the crew readies the boat, floodlights from other trawlers in the fleet twinkle brightly on the water. Dolphins cavort in the sea as squadrons of seagulls fly doggedly alongside the boat, waiting and hoping for a feed. When the official 8.30pm start time ticks over, the skipper signals go and the crew cast their prawn nets into the darkened water. Silently, the two funnel shaped nets,,, Read the rest here 08:32

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Ottawa to upgrade its three fisheries research centres in B.C.

The Conservatives, capping a weeklong string of funding announcements in B.C. in advance of a summer devoted to electioneering, announced Friday more money for the federal fisheries research centres in B.C. Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s Tories announced “up to” $18 million in funding for the Centre for Aquaculture and Environmental Research in West Vancouver, the Institute of Ocean Sciences in Sidney and the Pacific Biological Station in Nanaimo. Read the rest here 20:33

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Louisiana crab catch rose in 2014, preliminary state numbers show

Louisiana blue crab landings and price rose in 2014 compared to the 2013 catch, according to preliminary state numbers., according to preliminary state numbers. Catch rose about 8 percent and fishers garnered about 20 percent more money for that catch. Fishers in the state caught nearly 42 million pounds of crab in 2014 and brought in a new state record high $62 million for that catch, according to those preliminary number, released this month in the Lagniappe newsletter, a joint publication of Louisiana Sea Grant and LSU AgCenter. Read the rest here  19:41

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North Carolina Fisheries Association Weekly Update for May 22, 2015

NCFAClick to read the Weekly Update for May 22, 2015 as a PDF  To read all the updates, click here 17:24

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Clearwater Seafoods Launches New Argentine Scallop Harvesting Vessel

Clearwater Seafoods and Glaciar Pesquera S.A. announced that they have recently added a newly designed, state-of-the-art factory vessel to their Argentine scallop fleet, replacing and retiring one of the two existing vessels. The now fully-operational vessel strengthens Clearwater’s leadership in innovative, sustainable seafood harvesting. The Capesante, Italian for “scallop”, joins the company’s Argentine fleet based in the port of Ushuaia, the southern-most city in the world. Read the rest here 15:34

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Omega Protein ‘definitely next’ if Oceana-Daybrook deal goes through

Omega-Protein-300x225Foreign seafood companies such as Marine Harvest and Royal DSM are likely watching the Oceana-Daybrook deal approval process like hawks to see whether it will allow South Africa-based Oceana to follow through on plans to acquire Louisiana-based menhaden company Daybrook. The $382.3 million deal will be a litmus test for another likely acquisition target: Omega Protein, Tyson Bauer, a senior analyst with . “I think if this deal goes through, Omega Protein is definitely next,” Bauer, who follows Texas-based menhaden catcher and processor Omega Protein, said. Read the rest here 14:44

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Green light! Oregon Senate gives fish commish go-ahead to Buckmaster by 18-12 vote

The sportfishing industry and some recreational anglers lobbied hard to stop Gov. Kate Brown’s appointment of Astoria resident Bruce Buckmaster to the commission because of his work on behalf of the commercial fishing industry, but the Senate voted 18-12 to confirm Buckmaster. The Senate also voted 27-3 to confirm Jason Atkinson of Jacksonville to the commission. Senators voted unanimously to confirm 92 other appointments by the governor to various boards and commissions. Read the rest here 14:32

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Changes to halibut sharing a ‘callous, desperate’ ploy for votes, says FFAW

A decision by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans to deviate from an will have a deep impact on fishermen in Newfoundland and Labrador, and greatly benefit harvesters in Prince Edward Island, the home province of Fisheries Minister Gail Shea, a union leader says.  “It’s like taking bread from the table of hard-working Newfoundlanders and Labradorians just to buy votes in other parts of Canada,” Sullivan said.  Read the rest here 11:00

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Southwest Nova Scotia buyers on board with lobster marketing

A significant part of Nova Scotia’s most lucrative lobster fishery could soon be on board with some sort of lobster marketing levy, says Fisheries Minister Keith Colwell. Colwell said Thursday that buyers on the southwestern shore have agreed to pay a fee, although the structure and amount is yet to be determined. “It’s going to be a little bit complex to get it all in place, but at least this is the first breakthrough we’ve had,” said Colwell. Read the rest here 10:53

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New Hampshire’s Ayotte puts NOAA Administrator Sullivan on the Hot Seat – New call for outside review of NOAA assessments

The battle over the validity of NOAA fish stock assessments that continually have led to slashed groundfish quotas has reached a higher pitch, with mounting calls for a third-party assessment of the manner the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration assesses fish stocks. Under questioning by U.S. Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., on Wednesday, NOAA Administrator Kathryn Sullivan defended the accuracy of the agency’s fish stock assessments and said she would welcome a third-party review of the agency’s methods and performance,,, Read the rest here  Watch the video here 08:35

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Our View: White House putting politics ahead of fishery science

Bait Bag ObamaSomething happened Monday that made us wonder if there wasn’t finally some progress being made in fisheries management. About 150 businesses, organizations and individuals with interests in the fishing industry on the East, West and Gulf coasts expressed their support for the U.S. House of Representatives’ Natural Resources Committee work on reauthorizing the act that regulates. After years of losing battles with regulators, of finding too many deaf ears in Congress, of jaw-dropping incredulity over what appeared to be indiscriminate or capricious management that has decimated the Northeast groundfishing fleet, we thought it remarkable to read their letter to the committee chairman: Read the rest here 08:00

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The Magnuson Stevens Act and its Ten Year Rebuilding Timeline: Science or Fiction? by Meghan Lapp

viewer-call-to-action-e1381518852468Under the Magnuson Stevens Act (MSA), regional Fishery Management Councils must develop a rebuilding plan for every overfished fishery, and must “specify a time period for rebuilding . . . that shall be as short as possible . . . and not exceed 10 years . . .To read more, please click here: MSA and Its Ten Year Timeline: Science or Fiction?  18:45

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For pollock surveys in Alaska, things are looking up

Scientists have been conducting fish surveys in the Shelikof Strait for decades. But in February of this year, scientists moored three sonar devices to the seafloor and pointed them up toward the surface. The devices have been recording the passage of fish above them ever since. Because underwater devices cannot transmit data in real time, the sonar systems have been storing their data internally, leaving scientists in a state of suspense since February. But suspense turned to satisfaction last week when, working in cooperation with local fishermen aboard a 90-foot chartered fishing vessel, scientists retrieved the moorings from the bottom of Shelikof Strait. Read the rest here 17:31

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Oil Cleanup Ramps Up at Refugio State Beach As Questions Arise About Company’s Record

As oil continued to spread across the ocean from the site of an underground crude pipeline break near Refugio State Beach in Santa Barbara County, cleanup was being ramped up Thursday and questions were being posed about the pipeline’s owner’s regulatory infractions. Plains All American Pipeline operates the line that ruptured midday Tuesday, sending as many as 105,000 gallons of crude oil spilling down a canyon, under a culvert, onto the sand and into the Pacific Ocean. An estimated 21,000 gallons entered the water. Read the rest here 17:05

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Fishermen Prepare At Stonington Docks For A Week-Long trip to Georges Bank

Heavy rain and dark, foggy skies do not deter the commercial fishermen aboard the Heritage at the Stonington docks Tuesday as they prepared for a week-long voyage. A short video report here 16:37

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Rep. Bradley Byrne argues for new red snapper rules in face of Obama veto threat

Even as members of the U.S. House began debate on changes to the act that regulates the nation’s fisheries, the Obama administration indicated that the president would be advised to veto the revised legislation. The bill has the support of a diverse group of businesses, organizations and individuals representing fishermen and fishing communities from the East, West and Gulf coasts, who jointly signed a letter supporting HR 1335. The letter states its opposition, however, to a proposal from the five Gulf state marine resources directors,, Read the rest here 15:48

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Willapa worries: Fishermen protest salmon-harvest cutback in bay

wecker protestMore than 30 commercial fishermen and seafood processors picketed outside the annual Pacific County Marine Resource Committee Science Conference at the Cranberry Museum in Long Beach May 16, protesting a draft management policy they say could end commercial salmon fishing on Willapa Bay. The woman they believe is behind the policy, former Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission member Miranda Wecker, spoke at the conference, talking about lessons she’s learned working with state agencies in Willapa Bay over the past 23 years. Read the rest here 15:17

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, NOAA Propose Actions to Build on Successes of Endangered Species Act

nmfs_logoBuilding on the success of the Obama Administration in implementing the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in new and innovative ways, today the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Marine Fisheries Service (the Services) announced an additional suite of actions the Administration will take to improve the effectiveness of the Act and demonstrate its flexibility.  The actions will engage the states, promote the use of the best available science and transparency in the scientific process,,, Theres plenty more NOAA Rah Rah to read here 14:39

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Millions of pounds of unprocessed fish approved for export as MPR exemptions increase

The approved exemptions allowing millions of pounds of groundfish to be shipped out of the province unprocessed last year, even as it stressed the importance of minimum processing requirements (MPR) to rural regions and squabbled with Ottawa over relinquishing them. CBC Investigates obtained details on all requests for MPR exemptions from 2010 through 2014, using access to information. That data reveals an increasing number of requests, and approvals. And some of the species involved may be surprising. Read the rest here 09:51

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Trans-Pacific Partnership – Obama’s ugly show of presidential petulance

When the going got tough, Barack got in a huff, and then he got gruff. President Obama has worked himself into such a tizzy over the TPP that he’s lashing out at his progressive friends in Congress. He’s mad because they refuse to be stereotypical lemmings, following him over this political cliff called the Trans-Pacific Partnership. It masquerades as a “free trade agreement,” but such savvy and feisty progressive senators as Sherrod Brown, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren have ripped off the mask, revealing that TPP is not free, not about trade and not anything that the American people would ever agree to. Read the rest here 09:24

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Gillis resignation was over board appointment, say’s Walker undermined her credibility as Boards and Commissions director

Gillis said in an interview on Wednesday that she quit her position on May 13 after learning that Walker had decided to appoint Roberta “Bobbi” Quintavell to a vacant seat on the Alaska Board of Fisheries. The appointment rumors surfaced in a May 15 letter from commercial fishing organization United Fishermen of Alaska urging its members to contact the governor’s office to object to Quintavell’s possible appointment based on her close ties to the Kenai River Sportfishing Association, or KRSA, which led the fight that sunk Walker’s previous choice for the board seat, Robert Ruffner. Read the rest here 08:55

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Researchers study health issues among fishermen

How much are fishermen affected by long-term health problems such as hearing loss, lack of sleep and high blood pressure? A pilot study aims to find out and researchers are using the 500-plus members of the Copper River salmon driftnet fleet as test subjects.  “The Copper River fishing season lasts five months and most of the fleet is very digitally connected so it seemed a great fit,” said Torie Baker, a Sea Grant Marine Advisory Agent in Cordova. Read the rest here

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Fixing the fleet in time – New exhibition “When The Fish Came First,” which opens May 28

When Nubar Alexanian started visiting Gloucester in 1971 as a young man of 21, the harbor bustled with fishing vessels that hauled in millions of pounds a fish a day. He captured the hive of activity among the Gloucester-based fleet from onshore and on extended trips offshore. The Worcester-born photographer soon made the nation’s oldest seaport his home, immersing himself into the cornucopia of Gloucester life and landscape. Read the rest here 08:02

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Obama threatens to veto House Magnuson-Stevens fisheries bill that would “harm the environment and the economy.”

The administration strongly opposes fisherman-obama which would amend the Magnuson Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA) because it would impose arbitrary, and un necessary requirements that would harm the environment and the economy. Read the rest here  15:51

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Pipeline rupture pukes oil onto California coast

Cleanup crews fanned out Wednesday along a stretch of scenic California coastline stained by thousands of gallons of crude oil that spilled from broken pipe and flowed into the Pacific Ocean. Workers from an environmental cleanup company strapped on boots and gloves and picked up shovels and rakes to tackle the gobs of goo stuck to sand and rocks along Refugio State Beach on the southern Santa Barbara County coast. Read the rest here 14:37

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Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 63′ Steel Stern Trawler , 525HP, Cummins KTA 1150 with Permits

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For specifications, information, and 26 photos of the vessel, click here To see all the boats in this series, Click here 11:51

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Buckmaster, Atkinson to get full Senate vote for fish and wildlife commission

sportfishers oppose the appointment of astoria resident bruce buckmasterThe sportfishing industry raised an outcry after Gov. Kate Brown announced last month the appointment of Astoria resident Bruce Buckmaster to fill a seat on the commission that has been vacant for two years. Sportfishers complained Buckmaster had opposed a plan that allocates more fish on the Lower Columbia River to anglers, and they pointed out that none of the current commissioners or Brown’s appointees work in the sportfishing industry. The Senate Committee on Rules nonetheless voted unanimously to send Buckmaster,,, Read the rest here 10:26

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Captain loses commercial fishing license for 10 years for oyster violations; 2 crewmen fined

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries says three Houma men are convicted of oyster violations, and the captain of the boat involved has lost his license for 10 years. Samuel Dobson, 35, also was sentenced to pay $1,654 in fines, serve a year on probation and perform 120 hours of community service. He lost his license for a third conviction for taking oysters from a polluted area, department spokesman Adam Einck said in an email Tuesday. Read the rest here 09:53

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Coast Guard chopper from Oregon aids CA fisherman

A Coast Guard helicopter crew from North Bend on the southern Oregon coast has flown an ailing crewman from a commercial fishing vessel 30 miles off northern California to waiting medics in Crescent City, California. Petty Officer 3rd Class Katelyn Shearer in Seattle says the whole operation took about three hours Tuesday evening from the time the parent company of the 344-foot fishing vessel called a Coast Guard command center in Alameda, California, just before 5 p.m. Read the rest here, and here 09:27

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Blue crabs lead banner North Carolina fish catch

blue crabBlue crabs were the stars in a banner year for North Carolina commercial fishing. Fishermen sold 61.7 million pounds of finfish and shellfish in 2014, a 23 percent increase over the previous year, according to a news release from the state’s Division of Marine Fisheries. It was the first year landings had increased since 2010. The dockside value was $93.8 million, the most since 2002. “It’s certainly good news, and good news is needed,” said Jerry Schill, president of the North Carolina Fisheries Association. Read the rest here 22:36

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Seals threaten Scottish cod stock recovery

PREDATORY seals are constraining the recovery of cod stocks in Scottish west coast waters, research by the suggests. The study found that, although fishing has now halved, predation by seals has rapidly increased to compensate, eating up more than 40 per cent of the total stock. Seals have, historically, been anecdotally blamed for the reduction of Atlantic cod stocks. Grey seals are believed to consume nearly 7,000 tonnes of cod each year off the west of Scotland, where landed catches now amount to only a few hundred tonnes. Read the rest here 20:40

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The Enviro’s are Howling over the Icelandic whale meat shipment to Japan

Environmentalists reacted angrily Tuesday to a controversial shipment of fin whale meat to Japan by an Icelandic whaling company, saying it flouted international conservation agreements. Iceland and Norway are the only nations that openly defy the International Whaling Commission’s (IWC’s) 1986 ban on hunting whales. Icelandic whalers caught 137 fin whales and 24 minke in 2014, according to the anti-whaling group WDC, compared to 134 fin whales and 35 minkes in 2013. Read the rest here 19:59

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Mississippi Shrimp fishermen ready for 2015 season

miss shrimp opener 2015Biloxi, Ms. Commercial fishermen in Mississippi are busy repairing their boats and loading supplies in preparation for the upcoming shrimp season. The 2015 season is expected to open sometime in early June. Last year, the season began on June 18, but opening day will likely be earlier, this year. Commercial shrimp fishermen are certainly anxious to drop their nets and get the 2015 shrimp season underway. The docks are alive with activity as shrimpers prepare. And early indications, are promising. Read the rest here 19:25

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Search for Bella Coola fisherman suspended

863a4ac9dc_64635696_o2The search for a fisherman who went missing near Bella Coola last Friday has been suspended. RCMP conducted a three-day search for the 35-year-old local man after he was reported missing at 6:40 p.m. on May 15. He was last seen cleaning the deck of his commercial fishing boat at 5:30 p.m. but nobody noticed he was missing until 6 p.m. Read the rest here 17:09

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Sea You Home Safe! Seafish is calling on the UK’s fishermen to think about their safety

Seafish is calling on the UK’s fishermen to think about their safety after research revealed 46% of commercial fishermen consider their job to be dangerous but 34% say they rarely or never wear a Personal Flotation Device (PFD). Seafish’s safety at sea campaign, Sea You Home Safe, is continuing to call for the 12,000 fishermen across the UK to think about their safety before setting sail, with 7,000 new lightweight PFDs given to UK fishermen over the past year. Read the rest here 16:42

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Former Fish Board appointee Roland Maw fined $7k in Montana charges

Roland Maw, Gov. Bill Walker’s controversial appointee to the Alaska Board of Fisheries, pleaded no contest last week to illegally obtaining resident hunting and fishing licenses in Montana. As first reported by the Peninsula Clarion, Maw pleaded no contest to seven counts of license violations that he faced in Montana. According to the court order filed May 14 by Beaverhead County, Montana, Justice of the Peace Candy Hoerning, Maw purchased Montana resident licenses every year from 2008 to 2014. He claimed Alaska residency during those same years. Read the rest here 13:39

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Launching marks milestone in Eastport breakwater recovery process

boatlaunch051815_4.jpgEastport – With the launch of the Triple Trouble last week, the community took a step toward overcoming the devastation caused by the Dec. 4, 2014, collapse of the Eastport breakwater. The 48-foot lobster boat took its maiden voyage to the Griffin family pier at Quoddy Bay Lobster in Eastport, arriving to a small crowd of well-wishers shortly after 1 p.m. May 15. The Griffins’ boat, Double Trouble II, was one of three to receive major damage when the breakwater collapsed, said Eastport Port Authority Executive Director Chris Gardner. Read the rest here 12:30

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Louisiana Shrimp Season begins – Good catches, low prices mark opening day

louisiana shrimp openerArea fishermen reported good catches but low prices on the opening day of the spring shrimp season. “It’s kind of early to predict it now,” said Al Marmande of Al’s Shrimp Co. in Dularge, who expects his first catches to come in Tuesday afternoon. Marmande said he will have a good sense of the season by the end of the week but has heard reports of a good amount of brown shrimp along the coast. “I’m hearing they’re catching a few small shrimp, but not too many large shrimp,” he said. “They’re catching,,, Read the rest here 11:49

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A Week in the Life – Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Law Enforcement Weekly Report

This report represents some events the FWC handled over the past week; however, it does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement. The FWC Offshore Patrol Vessel Vigilance made its maiden voyage out of Destin.  On its first patrol, officers attempted to stop a vessel in federal waters about 10.5 miles south of the Destin Pass.  When they approached, the officers noticed the suspect vessel turn and began throwing red snapper from the boat. Lots more. Read the rest here 09:19

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