This is exciting! SMAST scientists improving cod counting technology

A new video system designed by UMass Dartmouth School for Marine Science and Technology (SMAST) scientists to assess the population of cod has passed its first major test, giving the researchers confidence that they can use this new approach to help improve the accuracy of future scientific assessments of this iconic species. Recent stock assessments indicate that the Gulf of Maine cod population is low and struggling to recover. Members of the fishing industry contest those results, suggesting the stock is much healthier than depicted in recent assessments. Video, Read the rest here 06:03

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Coast Guard, F/V Sao Paulo respond to disabled fishing boat 30 miles south of Block Island

The Coast Guard assisted two people aboard the 50-foot fishing boat Lois Virginia Thursday after the boat became disabled 31 miles south of Block Island. The crew aboard Lois Virginia used a VHF-FM radio to contact Coast Guard watchstanders at about 6:45 p.m. Wednesday to report their distress. The crew aboard the nearby 87-foot fishing boat Sao Paulo overheard the transmission and offered to tow the Lois Virginia into Point Judith, Rhode Island. F/V Matador assisted the Lois Virginia crew with their outriggers in the harbor. Read the rest here 21:32
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Cold? Get on a plane, puke some carbon, and warm up at the Cortez Commercial Fishing Festival this weekend!

The Cortez Commercial Fishing Festival is one of the most popular and most successful events in the Bradenton area every year, attracting tens of thousands of visitors and raising lots of money for an organization that works to preserve the Cortez Fishing Village and the environmentally essential wetland nearby. It’s been so successful that they don’t feel compelled to tamper with its success. So this year’s 34th annual Cortez Commercial Fishing Festival will be pretty much like all the others — two days of fresh-from-the-boat seafood, live music from great Bradenton-area bands and tours and displays on local marine life and the commercial fishing industry. Read the rest here 19:44

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Maine shrimp – get ’em while they’re hot!

Thanks to a study being conducted by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) and the states of Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts, four trawlers and two trappers have been selected to collect samples of northern shrimp from the Gulf of Maine. Each participating trawler is required to conduct five research trips in one region, and is being compensated $500 per trip. Each would be allowed to sell up to 1,800 pounds of shrimp per trip. Good article! Read the article here 17:30

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Video: Coast Guard Aircrew Delivers Dewatering Pump to Vessel Taking on Water North of Depoe Bay, Ore.

A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter aircrew lowers a dewatering pump to the crew of the fishing vessel Inseiner as it transits through the Pacific Ocean 11 miles north of Depoe Bay, Ore., Feb.10, 2016. The two-man crew of the Inseiner requested assistance from the Coast Guard after their vessel began taking on water. U.S. Coast Guard video by Air Facility Newport. Watch the video here 17:05

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F/V Westward scuttled. She caught a lotta fish, and will for eternity.

IMG_0440The F/V Westward, whose long career focused on catching fish, will now be attracting them. Fuller Marine Services reports the vessel was towed out of Boothbay Harbor, where it has languished for the past few years, and sunk in 100 fathoms of water. Chuck Fuller provided the following statement, as well as photos. “On Saturday, February 6, towed the Westward 32 nautical miles offshore and scuttled her. All pollutants, machinery, and floating material had been removed and the fuel and oil tanks had been cleaned. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued the permit for the specific location after consulting with local fishermen. Read the story here 12:45

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Don’t sell off our fishery to Royal Greenland – Time to “rise up,” Newfoundlanders

thDQ5HMQW1I hope I’m not too late, but what is the status of the Royal Greenland company’s plan to seemingly take over the Newfoundland fishery? If it is still under discussion, then I am probably the least qualified person to be entering this fray, but from reading things from much better informed individuals such as Father Ed Brophy, Gus Etchegary and others, it seems that Newfoundlanders are about to lose control of their fishery to Royal Greenland, a foreign company. This cannot be allowed. Read the rest here by Alun Davies, Outer Cove 12:34

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VIDEO – Russian Fishermen Catches Giant Squid

There are far too many mysteries that lurks in the deep blue ocean. Among these mysteries are stories of creatures found in the ocean. Ranging from mermaids to krakens or sea monsters. Most of them are stories told by those who claim that they have seen or handed over by those who heard it first hand by those who claimed they saw it. But when these Russian fishermen came across this colossal squid which is nearly close to a giant squid only proves how these mysteries might be true. Watch the video here 11:51

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Baker Beach – Body identified as Fisherman Josh Paulus from Eagle III

A body that was found washed ashore at Baker Beach Saturday afternoon has been identified as Josh Paulus, 31, one of the crewmen from the Eagle III, a Port Orford commercial fishing vessel that capsized near the entrance to the Coos Bay bar. Two crewmen — Paulus and Danny Matlock — had been missing from the Jan. 19 sinking. One other, Blaine Steinmetz, was found deceased. The captain of the boat, Glenn Burkhow, survived the incident. Matlock remains missing. Read the rest here 11:12:18  F/V Eagle III Memorial Fund click here

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An Important Message From Scott Lang – Please Help Support The Center For Sustainable Fisheries

viewer-call-to-action-e1381518852468Greetings from all of us here at CSF, This organization was founded on the principle that our fishermen, and the fishing industry, were not getting their voices heard and we wanted that to change. In the constant clamor over catch limits, stock assessments and bycatch there is little respect afforded to people whose livelihood rests squarely on an ability to discern what is occurring in the ocean month to month. In recent months CSF has ramped up its efforts to highlight the problems facing the industry and our groundfishermen in particular. CSF board members Dave Goethel and John Haran have been highly visible on both local and national media on the issue of industry funding of at-sea monitors. CSF program director Don Cuddy has gained valuable exposure for our mission with his excellent op-ed pieces and also with the recent documentary Counting Fish, filmed on the SMAST yellowtail survey trip. Read the rest here, and please donate. They are in YOUR corner! 10:00
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Vineyard Fishermen Give Cold Shoulder to Denmark Offshore Wind Developer

ae_dong_mattmayhew_wesbrightonA representative from Denmark’s largest energy company had a cold reception in Chilmark this week as commercial fishermen and others discussed a proposed wind farm south of the Vineyard. Andy Revill, a fishermen’s liaison for Dong Energy, traveled from the U.K. to meet with fishermen in preparation for mapping a large area of the sea floor where the company plans to install up to 100 turbines. The 472-square-mile lease area begins 15 miles south of the Vineyard and extends diagonally to the southwest. Mr. Revill said March would be too soon in terms of planning, but he was confident the obstacles could be overcome. “You guys sent people to the moon, so I’m sure we can work this out,” he said. “The moon would be a much better place for a wind farm,” replied Mr. Brighton. Read the rest here 09:21

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Polar bears put on show for Labrador fisherman

A fisherman from Labrador got to see a magnificent sight during a fishing trip in the Davis Strait. Jonathon Larkham took a video of two polar bears while he and others were Turbot fishing on factory freezer Saputi on Tuesday. Larkham, who’s from Port Hope Simpson, said they’ve been fishing for four to five weeks, and the thick ice is making it difficult. Watch the video here 09:00

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Bodega Bay Crab Fishermen still in Limbo – Crab disaster will headline Thursday’s Fisheries Hearing

dungenesscrabJim Kelly reports from the coast that crab were tested clean a couple of weeks ago which was followed up by a dirty test. Spots up and down the California coast are coming up with two clean tests so we will know soon if tests start coming in consistently clean. But until its consistent – no crab can be harvested. In the mean time the Crab Disaster has become the headline topic at the February 11th 43rd Annual Zeke Grader Fisheries Forum, hearing in Sacramento, Governor Jerry Brown has asked our Federal Government to declare this a “Disaster” to qualify for low interest loans and funding, and re-training for those who want to take a different career path. The list of speakers includes: Read the rest here 08:33

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UPDATED! American Eagle Captain, Eight Crewmen board fire stricken Vessel, Suppress fire, Crew Safe

The Coast Guard successfully coordinated the rescue of 42 people who abandoned ship when their caught fire approximately 1,800 miles south of the Hawaiian Islands, Wednesday. An HC-130 Hercules airplane crew from Air Station Barbers Point arrived on scene at 5:10 p.m. (HST), established communications with the fishing vessel’s crew and dropped a dewatering pump, flash lights and flares. Fong Seong 888, a Tuvalu-flagged oil tanker, arrived on scene at 5:30 p.m. (HST) to offer additional assistance. The captain of the American Eagle reported smoke had lessened from the disabled fishing vessel and boarded the vessel with eight crew members to suppress the fire. Read the rest here 07:03

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Maine Lobstermen pack Augusta hearing on controversial proposed licensing changes

Seth Morrissette works as a sternman on a lobster boat out of Friendship. He came to the podium at the Legislature’s Marine Resources committee, Wednesday, carrying his 3-year-old son, Levi, on his shoulders. His voice cracking, he told the lawmakers that his son would get his lobster license before he did. Morrissette was among a group who testified in support of a series of changes that would, in the words of Marine Resources Commissioner Patrick Keliher, “strike a difficult balance” between 5,800 current license holders and the nearly 300 on a long and unpredictable waiting list. Read the article here 21:21

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Coast Guard responding to report of 42 people abandoning fishing vessel 1,800 miles south of Hawaii

The Coast Guard is responding to a report of 42 people abandoning ship after their fishing vessel caught fire approximately 1,800 miles south of the Hawaiian Islands, Wednesday. The 40 crewmembers aboard 258-foot U.S.-flagged fishing vessel American Eagle abandoned ship at 10 a.m. (HST) into two life rafts, three work boats and one skiff. An emergency position-indicating radio beacon was activated and is transmitting information. Read the post here 19:54

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H-2B guest-worker program under fire over salary discrepancies

With crawfish season just around the corner, Congress’ decision to quadruple the size of a guest-worker program might be described as a gift to Louisiana’s seafood processing industry, which struggles to fill the seasonal jobs each year. But a recent report from the left-leaning Economic Policy Institute says the H-2B program amounts to little more than exploitation. Although employers and their lobbyists claim there is a shortage of these skilled and semi-skilled workers, wages for the Top 15 guest-worker occupations have remained flat or fallen over the past decade, said Daniel Costa, the institute’s director of immigration and policy research and author of the report. High unemployment rates persist in the top occupations, which suggests at the national level there are no labor shortages in those fields. Read the rest here 15:53

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Guest-worker program helps Louisiana seafood facilities

Congress’ decision to quadruple the size of a guest-worker program might be described as a gift to Louisiana’s seafood processing industry, which struggles to fill the seasonal jobs each year. The LSU AgCenter says about 60 Louisiana seafood processing facilities hire more than 2,000 guest workers each year to peel crawfish and shrimp, shuck oysters and filet fish. Most of the workers come from Mexico and Central America and work 60 hours a week for a few months. Read the rest here 15:26

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‘Wicked Tuna’ and Tequila’

The fishermen of Gloucester, Massachusetts are in the hunt once again to catch the biggest and largest quantity of their prize bluefin tuna. Often they have a fish on the line for hours, only to lose it when it pulls the hook or the line snaps. See what other troubles befall these warriors on this episode titled, “Tuna and Tequila.” As the episode begins, newcomer to the Gloucester fleet, Erin & Sarah lead the pack as last year’s winner Dave Marciano, captain of the Hard Merchandise, is the lone boat without a fish. The Hard Merchandise is hoping to catch one as they fish at night closer to Gloucester at Jeffrey’s Ledge. Read the rest here 14:41

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Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 48ft. Fiberglass Crabber/Gillnetter 349HP Cat – Price Reduced!

7592%2000Specifications, information and 21 photo’s  click here  To see all the boats in this series, Click here 12:06

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Always Top Quality! Your Seafreeze Ltd. Preferred Price List for February 10th, 2016 Has Arrived!

Seafreeze-LtdContact our sales team today @ 401 295 2585 or 800 732 273 Click here for the complete price list from Seafreeze Ltd. We are Direct to the Source-We are Fishermen-We are Seafreeze Ltd!  Visit our website! 10:49

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OLYMPIA: Public meeting on salmon forecasts, season-setting process scheduled on March 1

7b90b84d34401e9d20604d15f4598a41Anglers, commercial fishers and others interested in Washington state salmon fisheries can get a preview of this year’s salmon returns and potential fishing seasons during a public meeting March 1 in Olympia. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife will present initial forecasts — compiled by state and tribal biologists — of 2016 salmon returns. The meeting is scheduled from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in room 172 of the Natural Resources Building, 1111 Washington Street S.E., in Olympia. Those attending the meeting will have an opportunity to talk to fishery managers about the pre-season forecasts and participate in work sessions focusing on conservation issues and possible salmon fisheries. Read the rest here 10:20

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Bayshore town wants clammers to shell out

The future of clamming in Highlands is as murky as the waters of the Sandy Hook Bay. Just ask Tom Rhodes, a 50-year member of the clamming collective known as the Baymen’s Protective Association. “Don’t let them put us out of business,” Rhodes, clad in orange waders and bright blue gloves, said as he unloaded his haul at the dock of the local processing plant, following a recent outing. The Baymen’s lease for the James T. White Clam Depuration Plant, where clams — Cherrystone, chowder and littleneck — from the bay are cleaned before they go to market, lapsed at the end of 2015. The borough of Highlands is the owner of the property and elected officials there are keen on renegotiating the lease, including more than doubling the rent and tax payments to $8,700 per month — a tab some clammers say would be prohibitive. Read the rest here 09:02

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NOAA issues climate warning for scallops

AR-160209471.jpg&MaxW=650The NOAA study, formally known as the Northeast Climate Vulnerability Assessment, said Atlantic sea scallops have “limited mobility and high sensitivity to the ocean acidification that will be more pronounced as water temperatures warm.” “The biomass has been increasing over the last 10 years, and there is no sign of it depleting because of the warmer waters,” Richard Canasta said. “They’re talking a few degrees, and that’s not going to make much of a difference in terms of scallop population.” Read the rest here 07:21

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CFOOD: Ethical Issues in the Gulf Snapper Fishery

CFOODIn 2007 the Gulf snapper fishery moved to an individual fishing quota management system (IFQ). Under this system, each fisher was allocated a certain amount of fish for the year instead of having a fishing season and race to fish. Kingpins of the Gulf make millions off red snapper harvest without ever going fishing by Ben Raines, AL.com January 24th 2016 “AL.com has looked into the issue of leasing of red snapper quota, and found that prices for commercial leases have meant working fishermen often pay more to lease snapper quota from the quota holders than they earn from the catching the fish itself. They question why commercial snapper, unlike oil or forestry products, should not be put out to bid, but allocated to the historical fishermen.” Raines concluded that 77 percent of the annual red snapper catch is held by just 55 people. Bruce Turris, President of Pacific Fisheries Management Inc. responds. Read it here 21:12

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Judges Urge Mediation in Water Contract Fight

thMGLZMEJ9Calling an appeal between California environmentalists and federal agencies over expired water contracts a “bizarre position,” a Ninth Circuit panel Tuesday encouraged the parties to mediate the issue instead.,,  Appellant Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations argued Tuesday that the federal government failed to do environmental impact statements and violated the National Environmental Policy Act by approving the interim contracts. The federation claims the government has repeatedly renewed two-year interim agreements with contractors and ignored the long-term environmental impacts on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Read the rest here 20:55

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Finally, California Seeks Federal Disaster Declarations for Commercial Crab Fishing

dungenesscrabIn a letter to U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker, Gov. Edmund G. Brown Jr. today requested federal declarations of a fishery disaster and a commercial fishery failure in response to the continued presence of unsafe levels of domoic acid, a potent neurotoxin, in Dungeness and rock crab fisheries across California and the corresponding closures of those fisheries. “Crabs are a vital component of California’s natural resources and provide significant aesthetic, recreational, commercial, cultural and economic benefits to our state,” Governor Brown said in the letter to Secretary Pritzker. “Economic assistance will be critical for the well-being of our fishing industry and our state.” Read the rest here 20:17

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North Carolina Fisheries Association Weekly Update for Feb 8, 2016

NCFAClick here to read the Weekly Update, to read all the updates, Click here 14:09

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Coast Guard rescues two Fishermen Tuesday after boat overturns near Carolina Beach

450x266_q95 fv allicatThe Coast Guard rescued two men Tuesday after their boat overturned near Carolina Beach. Sector North Carolina watchstanders received a report at 11:06 p.m. Monday stating two men, ages 25 and 35, were aboard the 41-foot fishing boat Allicat, when the boat ran aground in Snow’s Cut. The men remained aboard and waited for high tide to re-float the boat, but at 1:16 a.m. Tuesday, watchstanders received notice the vessel overturned and one man was in the water. Read the rest here 13:37

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Moulton reports his letter spurs Reforms to NOAA observer program

Congressman Seth Moulton (D-MA) commended the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for agreeing to make important reforms to the Northeast Fishery Observer Program (NEFOP) for lobster fishing. In August, Moulton, along with Senator Elizabeth Warren, Senator Ed Markey, Congressman Stephen Lynch and Congressman Bill Keating sent a letter to NOAA that called on the agency to address issues with the observer program and its impact on the New England lobster industry. The letter asked for an action plan from NOAA for specific cost, sustainability and safety concerns raised by the region’s lobstermen. Read the rest here 12:44

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Why Does the ‘Calamari Capital’ Import the Frozen Stuff from China When Buying Local Supports the Economy?

Globalization has hit Rhode Island hard. Those manufacturing jobs that allowed my immigrant parents and generations of other Rhode Islanders the opportunity to raise their families in modest comfort are long gone. It’s not just manufacturing, either. Our state is touted as the “calamari capital” of the world. Yet, walk into any local supermarket today and you will find packages of frozen calamari from China competing with offerings from Galilee, often at a lower price. Now, we can sit around and lament the impact that globalization has had on our local economy, or we can personally change this troubling societal trend by taking a very simple action. Read the article here 10:08

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Cheap dollar paying off for lobster fishermen in southwestern Nova Scotia

exchange rateYarmouth – After being trapped by low shore prices in past years, this is a good season for lobster fishermen in southwestern Nova Scotia. What’s the catch? Many people are attributing the turnaround to the low Canadian dollar. Fishermen were paid around $6 a pound for their catches at the start of the season, compared to prices of $4 and even closer to $3 in recent years. Last week the price had climbed to around $10 a pound – not so great for the consumer, perhaps, but good for the fishermen. Read the story here 09:39

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Shetland Fishermen’s Association (SFA) warns skippers of dangers fishing near Total’s gas pipelines in Yell Sound

sfa-logoThe fishermen’s body has accused the company of “doing nothing” to make the area safe. It is urging shellfish boats in particular to stay away amid “serious” concerns for vessel safety. The concerns are due to the amount of rock dumped on top of the MEG (monoethylene glycol) and service lines running adjacent to the main gas pipelines coming from the Laggan-Tormore field west of Shetland. On Monday, following delays of more than 18 months, Total was finally able to announce that it had brought ashore the first gas as part of a £3.3 billion development viewed as crucial to the UK’s energy security. Read the rest here 08:55

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Thomas O’Malley, of Marshfield, joins Mark Alliegro in race to unseat U.S. Rep. William Keating

fishermen do vote“There’s a lack of common sense and nothing going on in Washington,” O’Malley said Monday about what prompted him to launch a campaign for Congress. “I want to bring common sense back to government.” Creating jobs in the district, easing government rules and regulations imposed on fishermen, stopping illegal immigration and strengthening the military to be “second to none” are major issues that should be addressed, O’Malley said. “He’s probably a nice man,” O’Malley said about Keating. “But I don’t think he’s done enough for the middle class and fishermen. He’s been in lockstep with the current administration and voted for the Iran deal, which has been horrendous for the U.S.” Read the rest here 08:26

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FFAW ‘lied to and misled’ members about scallop settlement, says lawyer

A lawyer for scallop fishermen in the Strait of Belle Isle says the Fish Food and Allied Workers union lied to and misled members about a settlement with Nalcor. David Goodland made the comment Monday in the Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador, where he summed up the case brought brought by 71 fishermen from the Great Northern Peninsula and southern Labrador. During summations from both sides, Cletus Flaherty, the FFAW lawer, argued that the court cannot consider any allegation of fraud because it’s not part of the fishermen’s statement of claim. Read the rest here 07:17

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Kodiak Fisherman Charged With First-Degree Murder Claims Self Defense

murder vesselThe man killed at a Kodiak harbor early Sunday morning was shot with an assault rifle by a former crewmate aboard his fishing vessel, according to charging documents filed in the case. Kodiak police announced the arrest of Washington state resident Matt Bowe, 28, early Sunday in the death of 25-year-old Welton Daniel Albers. Albers, who went by “Dan,” was from Houston, Texas, according to a statement sent Monday by the Kodiak Police Department.  According to an affidavit filed Sunday by Kodiak Police Department officer David Duncan, police first received a 911 call about the shooting about 12:45 a.m. Sunday. The caller, 26-year-old Everett Grass, told police that his friend had been shot several times aboard the fishing vessel Katherine. Grass frantically pleaded for officer assistance, the Kodiak statement said. Read the story here 05:53

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Why is the NMFS calling the New Hampshire obligatory NEFMC seat vacated?

NEFMC SidebarThe state of New Hampshire has been notified by the National Marine Fisheries Service of vacancies for New Hampshire’s obligatory seat and two at-large seats for the New England Fishery Management Council. New Hampshire’s obligatory seat is held by Ellen Goethel, who is completing her first term as a council member. Read the article/notice here. The process of filling council seats requires the governor of each New England state to submit the names of at least three candidates to the U.S. Secretary of Commerce for consideration. The state of New Hampshire uses a public process to recommend individuals for the governor to consider for submission. 22:30

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Icicle sues Alaska fisherman over $41k in unpaid credit

20150629---Icicle-Seafoods-in-Petersburg-being-sold-1-Alaska salmon processor Icicle Seafoods has sued a fisherman who it extended more than $41,000 in credit to but who allegedly never repaid the debt, the company said. The Kodiak, Alaska fisherman, Randy Blondin, used the credit provided through a “fisherman’s account” to outfit the vessel Stephanie Lynn for the 2014 fishing season, according to the company. The complaint asks a judge to order US Marshals to seize the vessel until the matter is resolved Read the rest here 16:26 

Stephen Taufen – More than just Antitrust, Lender Liability & Your Boat Loan Read it here 20:54

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F/V Ocean One breaks from anchor, drifts into Manasquan River railroad bridge

l_img_2846A commercial fishing boat anchored in a Manasquan River cove drifted into a NJ Transit railroad bridge this morning. The bridge spans the Manasquan River between Point Pleasant Beach and Brielle and carries train traffic along the North Jersey Coast Line. The unoccupied vessel, which has reportedly been anchored in a nearby cove for about two weeks, was towed to commercial docks by the U.S. Coast Guard, according to Jerry Meaney, a local first responder who posted a video of the scene. Link 14:26

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‘Fish-Work’ chronicles commercial fishing lifestyle at Imogen Gallery

AR-160209961.jpg&MaxW=600In anticipation of the upcoming FisherPoets Gathering, Imogen Gallery presents “Fish–Work,” an exhibition by professional artist and fisherman Corey Arnold of Portland. This will be Arnold’s second exhibition at Imogen, held in conjunction with the 2016 FisherPoets Gathering, an annual celebration of the fishing community, and a window into a very specific industry through stories and poetry written and recited by fisher folk. The exhibition opens Saturday, Feb. 13 for Astoria’s Second Saturday Art Walk with a reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Read the rest here 13:10

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Commercial Crabber Fined for Overfishing

dungenesscrabCalifornia wants a Washington state seafood company fined for the nearly two tons of dead Dungeness crabs it had to dump from a 17-ton haul: far more “dead loss” than can lawfully be taken even with a permit. A California Fish and Wildlife warden found defendant Pacific Dream’s commercial fishing boat, the Renard unloading crab caught in or around Half Moon Bay on Nov. 23, 2014. The captain showed a Dungeness Crab Vessel Permit and acknowledged the dead crabs came from his ship. The warden found 3,850 lbs. of dead crabs and 31,436 lbs. of live crabs. Read the rest here 12:39

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Mid Atlantic Fishery Management Council Meeting in New Bern, NC February 9 – 11, 2016

MAFMC LOGOThe public is invited to attend the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council’s February, 2016 meeting on Tuesday,  in New Bern, NC . Briefing Materials & Agenda Overview Agenda click here   Attend Meeting with Adobe Connect Click here Listen Live! 12:15

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Dockside killing in Kodiak – Washington man charged with 1st Degree murder

lgKodiakPolicePatchOne 28-year-old fisherman is dead and another is in custody after an early Sunday shooting in Kodiak’s Saint Herman Harbor. Kodiak police were notified of the shooting in the Saint Herman Harbor area at around 12:40 a.m. Sunday morning. There, officers found an unresponsive male with multiple gunshot wounds, police wrote in a statement Sunday. Medics transported the 28-year-old victim to Providence Kodiak Island Medical Center where he was later pronounced deceased, KPD said. The victim has not yet been identified pending notification of family members. “Police took 28 year-old Matt Bowe, from Washington state into custody and have charged him with murder in the first degree,” Kodiak police wrote. Link 11:36

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CSIRO head Larry Marshall defends climate research cuts as angry scientists protest

CSIRO head Larry Marshall has sought to defend deep cuts to climate science programs after days of sustained criticism, saying global warming research was “one piece of a much larger puzzle” in solving Australia’s biggest challenges. His defence came as dozens of scientists, including some whose jobs are under threat at CSIRO, rallied in Melbourne, warning the cuts would hurt Australia’s ability to address the climate change threat. Dr Marshall also claimed support for climate measurement, such as air pollution monitoring at the Cape Grim station in Tasmania and ocean research via the RV Investigator vessel, was not under threat. He said the Ocean and Atmosphere division of CSIRO would be reduced from 420 staff to 355. Read the rest here 10:43

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Mandurah: men fined $8000 for interfering with crab pots “just having a look”.

Two Halls Head men have each been fined $8,000 for interfering with commercial crab pots. On a Thursday night on November 26 last year, a Fisheries and Marine officer saw two people in a small runabout travelling around the Peel-Harvey Estuary and Cox Bay. Aaron Edwin Pollard (32) and Andrew Michael Collyer (31) were ordered to each pay $8,000 in fines, plus court costs of $169.10, for illegally pulling four commercial crab pots in Cox Bay under the cover of darkness. A recorded interview was heard in Mandurah court last week, where the men admitted to Fisheries and Marine Officers that they pulled the pots with the intention of Read the rest here 08:23

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Advocates Hope Seafood Marketing Campaign Will Net More Business for Local Fishing Industry

It took something terrible to turn Santa Barbara business advocates onto the idea of doing some good for the local commercial fishing industry. That awful thing — the May 2015 oil pipeline leak near Refugio State Beach — scared customers of all sorts away from seafood caught locally, crippling some fishing operations long after officials said the fare was safe to eat. Around that time, the Santa Barbara Chamber of Commerce realized it could do a better job serving fishermen by coming up with a collective campaign to brand local catch sold outside the area. Read the rest here 07:34

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Fishing for China: Making money off Asia’s growing appetite

chef-nathan-fong-at-qingdao-food-expoIf you want to sell seafood to the Asian market, the China Fisheries and Seafood Expo in Qingdao is a must-attend. It’s the biggest of its kind in Asia and one of the biggest in the world. This year’s attendance weighed in at 30,000 people, 1,300 companies and 45 countries. At the corner booth of the Canadian pavilion — which is in just one of seven large convention centres, all on a massive exposition compound just on the edge of the port city of Qingdao — is the Newfoundland and Labrador counter. Read the rest here 06:43

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Latest Green Idea: Pouring Millions of Tons of Bubble Mix into the Sea

A new study suggests that large ocean going ships could help reduce global warming, by pouring surfactants into their wake, to extend the life of the shiny bubbles churned up by ship’s propellers. According to the Huffington Post; … Crook and her co-authors maintain that their climate model shows the scheme could bring a 0.5-degree Celsius reduction in the Earth’s average surface temperature by 2069, helping to offset the 2-degree warming expected by then. Pouring enough surfactant into the sea, to allow bubbles to survive for 10 days in open water, might kill a lot of sea life. Surfactants are often used in cleaning products, such as dish washing liquid, because they are very effective at breaking up organic matter. Read the rest here 17:06

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Farmed Atlantic Salmon make Seafood Watch’s ‘avoid’ list

Farmed atlantic-salmonEnvironmentalists and an aquaculture company disagree about the findings of a new report from the United States that advises consumers to avoid some farm-raised Atlantic Salmon.  “It’s not surprising, it’s clear that we need to have improvements in Canada. If we want to even be nearly equivalent to some of the better practices that are happening in Norway and Scotland,” said Susanna Fuller, a Marine Conservation Coordinator with the Ecology Action Centre. Read the rest here 16:34

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Pros and Cons Of Internet Onboard Ships: A Sailor’s Perspective

Beginning your career in the new millennium has its own plusses and minuses. One cannot take away the fact that seafaring was an entirely different ballgame ‘back in the days’. While one had to endure more hardships and longer tenures, life was a tad better off when it came to port stays, paperwork, commercial pressures, traffic density etc. Pros 1. Keeping abreast with current affairs and sporting events. CONS: 1. Onboard Social Life,,, Although this is about merchant mariners, Fishermen also have access to the internet. Interesting.  Read the rest here. 15:38

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Lake Okeechobee – More bad water? We hope not

Here we go again. Large amounts of polluted water from Lake Okeechobee are beginning to flow into the Caloosahatchee. This is harmful fresh water and is the result of a need to drop the lake level because of unprecedented rain amounts. It is water filled with the wrong kind of nutrients and phosphorous. It can create suffocating algae blooms, killing sea grass and marine life. It can impact tourism. No one wants to fish, swim or look at ugly water. Read the rest here 14:24

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Water managers race to drain rising Lake Okeechobee risking wide spread damage to estuaries

Lake Okeechobee’s aging dikeThe Corps could begin sending as much as 4.9 billion gallons of water — about 7,400 Olympic swimming pools — daily into the St. Lucie river on the east coast. Even more would be released into the larger Caloosahatchee on the west coast. Such massive dumps in the past have caused widespread damage to the estuaries at the mouths of the rivers, where seagrass beds and oysters can’t tolerate such high amounts of freshwater. Already, a brown plume has spread off the coast of Sanibel. The last time so much water was released, in 2013 and following a 1998 El Niño, fish kills and dead sea life lasted for months, infuriating local communities. Read the rest here 11:19

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Lowenthal introduces Albatross and Petrel Conservation Act to protect imperiled seabirds

Alan-Lowenthal-20150715-770x450Congressman Alan Lowenthal (CA-47) today introduced new legislation that will protect imperiled seabirds from international fishing threats and increase ongoing conservation efforts in the United States and abroad. The Albatross and Petrel Conservation Act would implement the international Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels (ACAP), a conservation agreement that has been signed by thirteen member countries since 2001.  President George W. Bush first asked the U.S. Senate to ratify the agreement in 2008, and while President Barack Obama has listed it as a priority, the Senate has yet to take action. Read the rest here 11:00

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Red-snapper limits help Louisiana’s restaurants and economy: Brett Veerhusen and Haley Bittermann

redsnapperLouisiana catches about 1 billion pounds of seafood every year for commercial sale, and with the demand for local seafood at an all-time high, we rely on our nation’s fishery management process to ensure sustainable fisheries. Louisiana restaurants rely on locally sourced, sustainably managed seafood. Close to 70 percent of seafood harvested off the Gulf Coast is landed in Louisiana. Chances are your delicious plate of red snapper is from one of our many locally run Gulf fisheries. Read the rest here 10:13

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Coast Guardsmen find film an apt tribute

“We all live or we all die.” That’s Boatswain Mate Kelly Zimmerman’s favorite line from the movie “The Finest Hours” which he saw at a special showing in Boston with other members of Coast Guard Station Chatham last week. In the film those words are said by actor Chris Pine, who Zimmerman got a chance to meet when the star shadowed him and other Coasties for character development during filming. Those words were first uttered by Coxswain Bernie Webber, whom Pine portrays in the movie. Webber took three other Coast Guardsmen out during a nor’easter on Feb. 18, 1952 to rescue 33 men on the stern of the tanker Pendleton. With waves more than 60-feet high and the deadly Chatham Bar to cross many called the attempt a suicide mission. Read the rest here 09:02

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Fish Grab: Push and pull, as fishermen debate proposed tourist fishery

The notion that tourists should be able to drop a fishing line in the ocean all summer long has ignited a fierce debate on CBC Radio’s The Broadcast. Mussel Bed Boat Tours in Lewisporte is lobbying the federal government on behalf of 40 tour boat operators. “We proposed that we would start the season the first of June and end it at the end of September or the first of October, and that we would retain two fish per tourist per trip,” said Mussel Bed’s owner Graham Wood. “That doesn’t make any sense to me, right,” said Bay de Verde fisherman Tony Doyle, who’s against the proposal and worried about competition. “They can catch fish on his vessel when he’s out, but I’ll still be sitting on the end of the wharf and waiting for a three week fishery.” Read the rest here 07:53

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Well Preserved

In 1979, Bumble Bee Seafoods divested some of its properties on the Lower Columbia River. Nine fishermen purchased seven acres in Clifton from the seafood company. The property included a cluster of cannery-related buildings such as a net storage and receiving station, boat shed, net drying racks and bunkhouse. Jack Marincovich, now 83, was one of those nine fishermen. He grew up in Clifton and is encyclopedic in his recollection of its buildings and their occupants. “It was a pretty tight community,” he recalled. Read the article here 19:41

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Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission approves NJ option for summer flounder

New Jersey is one step closer to becoming its own summer flounder management region. The  unanimously approved an option Tuesday during their winter meetings in Virginia to allow for a New Jersey/Delaware Bay management region. It would pull the state out of its present management region which it shares with Connecticut and New York.The New Jersey Marine Fisheries Council must now vote to adopt the measure. The council’s next meeting is March 3. Read the rest here 19:21

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North Carolina Shrimp fishermen help state researchers gather data

When researchers head out this summer and fall to test gear to reduce NC shrimp, they will do so with an important partner. Area fishermen will be offering up their time and use of their private trawlers to help state researchers gather information on the effectiveness of various gears in reducing bycatch of finfish in trawl nets. Plans are to test three gear options in each the summer and fall shrimp fishery; a task that will involve the use of three trawls each season for about three weeks each. “We’ve budgeted 15 days for each vessel with a goal of 30 tows for each one of the gears,” said Kevin Brown, gear development biologist with the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries. Fishermen and others involved in the shrimp fishery have also had a say in what gears will be tested. Read the article here 14:37
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Congressman Hunter calls for a ban on some American aid tied to South Pacific Tuna Treaty

This follows the end of the treaty arrangements when the US failed to pay its first quarter levy and the Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency is no longer issuing licences to fish for tuna in the island countries’ waters.Hunter wants the US Congress to stop the US Government using congressionally approved funds as aid to the Pacific countries involved – which includes all the independent island nations in the region. Congress allocates about US$21 million dollars each annually to the US State Department as part of the federal government’s  under the Tuna Treaty. Hunter said it’s important to stress economic assistance does not occur on its own; it had always been tied to United States boats fishing in the Treaty area. Read the rest here 10:59

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