Coast Guard medevacs injured fisherman 100 miles off Coos Bay

A Coast Guard aircrew medically evacuated a 26-year-old man Saturday morning off the fishing vessel McKenzie Rose 100 miles west of Coos Bay. The fishing vessel’s captain used a marine radio to hail watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector North Bend at approximately 5:30 a.m. to report a member of the crew sustained a head injury and was in need of medical attention. The McKenzie Rose began to transit toward shore to more quickly rendezvous with the Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter aircrew. >Video, click to watch, read< 21:55

NOAA Cancels Three Northeast Research Surveys due to Coronavirus Uncertainties

Due to the uncertainties created by the Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic and the unique challenges those are creating for NOAA Fisheries, we are cancelling three research surveys off the Northeast United States. The cancelled surveys include those for sea scallop, Atlantic surfclam/ocean quahog, and an advanced technology survey investigating the ocean’s mesopelagic layer—the “twilight zone.” These are difficult decisions for the agency as we strive to balance our need to maintain core mission responsibilities with the realities and impacts of the current health crisis. >click to read<  20:42

In Coastal Oregon, Fishing Gear Makers Strive for Sustainability

Sara Skamser makes and modifies commercial fishing nets in Newport, Oregon. The co-owner of Foulweather Trawl got her start in the commercial fishing business  as a crew member on small crab and salmon boats. Net skills, like sewing and splicing, became one more thing to help Sara land a gig. “In the late 70s and early 80s, I was bucking to get on a big boat,”,,, That dream hit a dead end when Sara asked some of Newport’s larger operations to let her join their crews. “These guys just absolutely turned purple,” she says. “And so the bottom line to that is I invoice those people now,” she laughs., About a half hour south on the coastal highway, Leonard Van Curler is also making fishing gear. Some of the tools he uses are similar to Sara’s, such as the shuttle-like “needle” he uses to knit mesh. But what he’s making are crab pots,,, >click to read< 15:43

New Zealand fishing crew pleads guilty to violent Falkland Islands pub assault – Face two years in prison

They were part of a Sanford crew fishing on the San Aspiring in the South Atlantic Ocean since February, and were due to be repatriated when the assaults occurred. The court was told the men, Sonny Ball, Samuel Goldsworthy, and Chassy Duncan, indiscriminately assaulted a group of customers in a bar after they were refused service because the premises was closed for the night. Penguin News deputy editor Roddy Cordeiro was in court and said five patrons were hospitalised, including one with a broken wrist, after the violent assaults. During the attack, one of the defendants struck a woman who was cowering on the floor and another patron was struck with a glass. The trio were denied bail because of the unprovoked nature of the attack and will be sentenced later this month. >click to read< 13:14

Flounder, fluke, and flying by the seat of your pants – Bob Mone’s life as a fish broker.

The origins of Vineyard Co-op go back to a guy named Steve Boggess, who around 1970 ran Boggess Seafood out of Woods Hole on the pier over where the ferry shuttles back and forth to Naushon. Trip Barnes, who did trucking for Boggess, described him as “a college guy, kind of a yuppie. But he had a mind like a steel trap.” But the Steamship Authority, which owned the dock where Boggess’s office was located, put the squeeze on Boggess and forced him to leave. So Ralph Packer agreed to build a dock next to his gas tanks on Vineyard Haven harbor and Boggess moved his business to the Vineyard. Around 1975 Mone answered an ad looking for a manager at Boggess Seafood. At the time he was driving a milk truck on the Island and the only thing he knew about fish was that you buy them at a fish market. photo gallery,  >click to read< 10:59

Westport feeling deep loss after fishing tragedy

“You couldn’t get those two boys to sit still for too long, they were real adventurers,” Cole Rutzer, a 22-year-old Westport man whose body was found July 3 on the beach of a remote island near Kodiak Island, Alaska. He and his  longtime friend and fishing boat crewmate Dylan Furford had taken a  skiff from the larger boat to explore the island. Furford is missing and the Coast Guard has suspended its search. The two were part of a four-man    crew on the Westport-based Pacific Dynasty, fishing for Dungeness crab. Rutzer’s dad, Greg, is the captain and his cousin, Brent Gilbertson, was the other crew member. The boat had dropped crab pots and had some down time so Cole Rutzer and Furford, also in his early 20s, had gone to Tugidak Island, taking Trigger, Cole’s dog. >click to read< 08:07

Senate Candidate Joe Kennedy was in Gloucester Friday to hear Fisherman and Industry member concerns

This morning in Gloucester at 9 am, Joe Kennedy met with fishermen, industry representatives, and local politicians to discuss with them, their  concerns about the fishing industry. Topics of discussion included Offshore Wind Farms, Imported fish from Iceland, Fishery Observers and Monitoring, NOAA science, and the need for a U.S. Farm Bill tailored to the needs of the unique and varied fisheries of the nation, including timely fishery disaster relief aid. Sam Parisi, photo’s,  >click to read< 19:19

Setting the New Normal – Point Steele

With concern over the 2020 Bristol Bay salmon season and Covid-19, there was only optimistic excitement at Washington State’s Velocity Marine as   the yard’s latest newbuild headed for sea trials.,, With a capacity of 18,000 pounds (8165kg) in RSW, Point Steele will deliver to the tender multiple  times in an opening. Even loaded, the boat can be expected to make roughly half the light boat’s speed. Lenco trim tabs help optimise performance under different load conditions. To make these speeds Point Steele is powered with a pair of Cummins QSC8.3 engines. photo’s, >click to read< 17:01

UPDATED: American fisherman detained entering British Virgin Islands – New Jersey delegation aware

An American longline fishing boat captain has been in jail for a month after he was detained in the British Virgin Islands on June 8 for traveling into BVI waters during coronavirus border closures. Now he is facing criminal charges and a monthslong wait in a sweltering island prison cell. Michael Foy, who lives in Puerto Rico and left the island May 29 on a fishing expedition, was initially detained for illegal entry into the British Virgin Islands, but at his June hearing he was also unexpectedly charged with illegal fishing. >click to read< 13:21

New Jersey Senators write Deputy Governor on fisherman’s arrest – “We are aware that our constituent, Michael Foy, has been detained in Tortola and have been in communication with the State Department and the [United States] Embassy in Barbados regarding the case,” according to the June 30 letter signed by Senators Cory Booker and Robert Menendez and Congressman Andy Kim. >click to read< 10:09 7/11/20

North Atlantic right whale – from Endangered to Critically Endangered

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) announced Thursday it has changed the status of North Atlantic right whales on its Red List from endangered to critically endangered, IUCN’s highest risk category for wild species. This means the population has or will decrease by 80 per cent within three generations and is facing an extremely high risk of extinction. According to Canadian conservation group Oceana, at least 31 North Atlantic right whales have been killed since 2017 — 21 of them in Canadian waters. >click to read< 11:45

The International Union for Conservation of Nature changed its Red List Category for North Atlantic right whales from Endangered to Critically Endangered>click to read<

SURVEY: Please Help Extreme Gloucester Fishing: Restructure, Retool, Retrain, Revive and Reunite the U.S. Commercial Fisheries

Extreme Gloucester Fishing Commercial Industry Training Center is doing a U.S. Commercial Fisheries Survey – Please help Extreme Gloucester Fishing with our efforts to Restructure, Retool, Retrain, Revive and Reunite the U.S. Commercial Fisheries Take the Survey. 1. Do commercial fishermen care about their industry? 2. Should fish be owned before they are caught?, 3.,,,  >click to read<, and please leave comments or suggestions, and connect with others to get things started! Thank you, Captain Joseph Sanfilippo 10:30

Commercial Fisherman George Roy Hutchings Jr. of Kodiak, Alaska and Damariscotta, Maine

George Roy Hutchings Jr., 60, of Kodiak, Alaska and Damariscotta, passed away peacefully on Friday, July 3, 2020 at his home here in Maine with family at his side. He attended Nobleboro Central School and Christian Academy during his grammar school days. He attended Lincoln Academy, while working in South Bristol clamming, and later earned his GED. He left Maine in his teenage years to start his adventures in fishing in Point Pleasant, N.J., then on to more adventures scallop dragging in New Bedford, Mass. At the age of 20, George headed for an even greater and larger adventure in Homer, Alaska, where, after some tough times, he became a king crab and scalloping fisherman for many years. >click to read< 09:09

Boat parade to honor Andy Gove, July 12th event to memorialize well-known fisherman

On Sunday, July 12, a day when Andy Gove might have been racing his fishing vessel—and winning—his friends and family will stage a boat parade in Stonington Harbor. Gove, a well-known and well-liked fisherman, died June 20 shortly after celebrating his 90th birthday at his home on the harbor. “He didn’t want a funeral and all his friends and the fishermen felt terrible,” said Gove’s daughter, Myrna Clifford. The plan is for boats coming from the east, south and west to slowly come together and form a line from the point of Greenhead and then down toward the Fish Pier. >click to read< 07:13

Prime Lobster Season Is Here, but Mike Dawson Isn’t Celebrating.

Mike Dawson (self-employed) Location: New Harbor, Maine Employees: 1, Status: Open, essential industry. The lobsters have just started to “come on” for the 2020 season, which in the lexicon of a Maine lobsterman means the annual lobster migration and catch has begun for the summer. Normally,  that would signal a time for the state’s 5,000 lobster harvesters to spend all their time setting and hauling traps. Not this year. This season is marked by weak demand from restaurants across the country and seafood processors that are taking less meat during the coronavirus pandemic. International markets have slammed shut. As a result, lobster prices are weak.Some lobstermen are still sitting on the sidelines, collecting unemployment. Others, like Mike Dawson, who fishes off New Harbor, Maine, have diversified by catching pogeys, or bait fish, in addition to catching lobster. 16 photo’s, >click to read< 16:05

Northern Right Whales Are on the Brink, and Trump Could Be Their Last Hope

The task of responding will fall to an unlikely champion, President Trump, whose recent appeals for support from Maine lobstermen could clash with the task of saving the right whale. Peter Corkeron, a senior scientist at the New England Aquarium who spent nearly a decade chronicling the gruesome deaths of right whales as the director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association’s research program for large whales, said he feared the listing would have little impact. “Lobstermen certainly recognize the dire circumstance that the right whale species is in right now,” Patrice McCarron, “We’re in this awkward situation where right whales are not doing great, and it’s certainly not the fault of the commercial fisheries.”PEER also filed a complaint last year with the inspector general of the Commerce Department, which oversees NOAA, arguing that federal officials intent on reopening fishing areas have been ignoring their own scientists on climate change as well as other threats to whales. >click to read< 11:37

A NASA Diver/Commercial Fisherman is Among the Cast on CBS Reality Show

Tough As Nails. It takes 12 Americans from all walks of life whose common thread is that they work in tough, gritty jobs — ironworker, firefighter, welder, Marine Corps veteran, and more. They will compete both as individuals and on teams to win cash and prizes, with one of them ultimately being crowned the Tough As Nails champion. One of the competitors is Callie Cattell, a 28-year-old from Bend, Oregon, who spends her time working as a commercial fisherman in the frigid waters off the Alaskan coast. But in addition to that harrowing job, Cattell is also a diver for NASA. video>click to read< 10:34

1 dead, 2 rescued after boat capsizes near China Poot Bay

One person is dead and another two were rescued Wednesday from the waters of Kachemak Bay by commercial fishermen and a surfer when their boat capsized near the mouth of China Poot Bay.,, The crew of the Casino took two males on board, including the one being given CPR by Tillion. The Casino is faster and was able to get them back to the harbor more quickly, Hollis said. “Everybody responded very well,” Hollis said of Tillion, Linegar and his deckhand. Crew from the F/V Captain Cook, captained by Malcom Milne, brought the third person back to the harbor. >click to read< 09:23

Bob Guzzo Talks Quotas, Offshore Wind, Coronavirus, and Fishing out of Stonington, Connecticut

“We’re giving up traditional fishing grounds that we’ve had for hundreds of years, that have fed the country, that are now going to light a light bulb and it’s not going to be worthwhile,” Guzzo said of the proposed wind farms located in federal waters. The location of the wind farms also destroys longtime fisheries, said Guzzo. “They’re taking away places that we’ve fished for this country over hundreds of years and we’re losing that ground,” he said.,, Quotas and Coronavirus, “I got tired of throwing fish overboard, I could never stand it. I started too long ago and never had to do this. The way they make you fish today is a crime,” >click to read< 08:01

Crab fisherman files cease-and-desist against fiber-optic surveyors

The world’s longest fiber-optic cable may be coming to Eureka, but crab fishermen say ships associated with the project have disrupted what’s left of this year’s crabbing season. But longtime crab fisherman Ken Bates filed a cease-and-desist order this week against the survey ships, saying their presence threatens to destroy Dungeness crab gear, or worse, displace gear far into the ocean, where it could entangle whales and prompt the state to sanction the coastal industry.  >click to read< 19:43

Bristol Bay Fisheries Report: July 7, 2020

We have the first million-fish catch day in the bay! Egegik harvested 1 million and 30 thousand fish, and the Naknek-Kvichak district and the Nushagak both had harvests over 950,000.  The total run across the bay jumped by 4 million fish yesterday, to 15.5 million fish. With respect to Egegik’s big catch yesterday, Egegik management biologist Aaron Tiernan had this to say in an email, “Wow! That was impressive. Based on Port Moller, there is still a good amount of fish to come.”,, A boat sinks in the Nushagak district.,, “I have never picked so much fish in my life in one opener” – Nushagak drifter describes a big opener. >click to read< 14:13

Inadequate Assessment by DFO Leaves Harvesters with Rollover for 2020 Cod Catch Limits

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) announced the management plan for northern cod yesterday evening, revealing a rollover in the total allowable catch from last year. The rollover is a result of an inadequate assessment that failed to take into account important data as well as harvester observations – the result of which will have dire impacts on an already suffering inshore fishery. “ A rollover for this year’s quota is completely unacceptable and must be reconsidered by DFO before the season opens,” says Keith Sullivan, FFAW-Unifor President.>click to read< 13:29

DFO‘s Lack of a Full Assessment Leads to a Roll-over in the Allowable Harvest of the Stewardship Cod Fishery for 2020 – The Newfoundland and Labrador Groundfish Industry Development Council (NL-GIDC) believes that the rollover in the allowable harvest for the 2J3KL Cod Stewardship fishery is somewhat disappointing but not surprising. >click to read<

Newport restores water to commercial users – Fishing industry expresses gratitude

As part of the city of Newport’s declared water emergency, production at fish processing plants on the Bayfront had been halted. This action was taken because the city could not supply its industrial users with water,,, “There were financial losses and disruption in the fishing community when this happened, but we got though it.” Steele said the water-related restrictions and closures have been just one of many very different challenges this industry has had to face in the last few months. “It’s a resilient industry. We took a hit, but we kept the fishery up and running,” she said.  >click to read< 12:46

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 97′ Longliner with Permits, (2) 425 HP Cummins KT-19s, (2) Cummins Lima – 60 KW Gensets

To review specifications, and information, >click here<  Vessel is in good condition. Longline – Hydraulic spool reportedly holds approximately 50 miles of monofilament line, more,,, To see all the boats in this series, >click here<11:17

Kingfish Zeeland seeks state permit to draw and discharge seawater for $110M fish farm proposed in Jonesport

Kingfish Zeeland, which has an agreement to develop a 94-acre site on Dun Garvan Road, east of central Jonesport on Route 187, needs approval from the state Department of Environmental Protection to draw and discharge seawater between the land-based plant and Chandler Bay. The company says it plans to filter and cool the water that is discharged into the bay to make sure it is clean and that it does not affect the water temperature in the bay, where many local lobstermen set their traps.,, Kingfish officials said Tuesday that the discharge permit will be “one of the most critical permits” for the project. The company also is expected to apply for permits from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and from the Jonesport planning board, which it will need to get prior to starting construction, possibly in 2021. >click to read< 09:48

Fishers have elected to limit quotas for Blue Crab and Rock Lobster in SA

Primary Industries and Regional Development Minister Tim Whetstone said the two revised plans will see fishers make short term sacrifices to allow crab and lobster populations to grow for the long-term benefit of all fishers, seafood consumers and the environment. “The government is committed to growing SA’s seafood industry and ensuring we have sustainable fish stocks for future generations,” he said. “There has been strong growth in Blue Crab and Southern Rock Lobster populations as a result of our fishers’ sustainable practices. >click to read< 09:29

Honolulu mayor announces new ‘fish-to-dish’ program to help Hawaii’s struggling fishing industry

“We have an incredible longline fishing industry,” said Caldwell during a news conference at Pier 38, “and local fishermen who go out every day in grueling conditions, catching fish and bringing it back to feed our residents and visitors.” But the longline fishing industry has lost an estimated $10 million, or about 60% in revenue, since mid-March lockdowns went into effect due to the pandemic, Caldwell said. In an effort to help, he said the city is committing $2.6 million in federal coronavirus funds to help the fishing industry get back on its feet. The “fish-to-dish” program will work in partnership with the Hawaii Longline Association, the United Fishing Agency, which runs the fish auction, and Hawaii Seafood Council to distribute fish to the community.>click to read< 08:23

‘Home and Dry’: Fishing crews urged to turn the tide on industry’s safety record

The campaign comes as many fishing crews across the UK are returning to sea following weeks of lockdown and challenging market conditions to sell their catch. Created with support from the fishing industry, it focuses on the importance of community and home for those who make a living from catching fish. It shines a light on the pride and professionalism of the industry as a way to get vital out messages about good safety at sea. Dave Driver, a skipper featured in the campaign, says: “I’ve been a fisherman for most of my life, and as a vessel owner I am constantly thinking about my safety and the safety of my crew. >click to read< 07:30

The 2020 P.E.I. spring lobster season that almost didn’t happen because of coronavirus, comes to an end

The spring lobster season on P.E.I. ended July 4 after a late start on May 15, in a year when fishermen faced low prices and catch limits due to a shortage of labour in processing plants. After losing the crucial first two weeks of the season, fishermen saw a glut of lobsters, pulling in more than buyers would take. There are eight processing plants on Prince Edward Island that deal with lobster. “At the end of the day, we had a season. That meant job creation and it also meant wealth creation for the province during a time when a lot of the other sectors were suffering,” >click to read< 19:30

As Jaws reaches its 45th – 45 Things About Jaws You Might Not Know

As we celebrate the 45-year anniversary of the movie that changed the summer blockbuster, or in this case the movie that actually invented the summer blockbuster, Jaws. These 45 interesting facts about Jaws will be in no particular order. One of the great things about Jaws is that it was filmed on location and not in a studio. They hired hundreds of local extras and many local actors to fill the roles. The medical inspector who lists the Chrissie  Watkins death as a boating accident; the young Cassidy, who passes out before he can go skinny-dipping with Chrissie Watkins; the fishermen who lose their holiday roast while on the dock and so many others were all real local Martha’s Vineyard residents. The beer brand that Quint drinks aboard the Orca is called Narragansett. It was a popular beer in places like Rhode Island and New England and at one time was a sponsor of the Boston Red Sox.>click to read< 18:27

Study: Microplastic fiber pollution harms lobster larvae

A study published in the Marine Pollution Bulletin reports that the fibers affect the animals’ feeding and respiration, and they could even prevent some larvae from reaching adulthood. “Lobsters play a fundamental role in the Gulf of Maine ecosystem as well as the state’s economy, and it is important that we understand how pollutants impact their development.” Young lobsters grow to adulthood through four distinct developmental stages, and the researchers found that the physiology of each stage determined how the animals interacted with plastic fibers. The youngest lobsters didn’t consume them—but they were plagued by fibers accumulating under the shells that protect their gills. >click to read< 16:04