Well Preserved

In 1979, Bumble Bee Seafoods divested some of its properties on the Lower Columbia River. Nine fishermen purchased seven acres in Clifton from the seafood company. The property included a cluster of cannery-related buildings such as a net storage and receiving station, boat shed, net drying racks and bunkhouse. Jack Marincovich, now 83, was one of those nine fishermen. He grew up in Clifton and is encyclopedic in his recollection of its buildings and their occupants. “It was a pretty tight community,” he recalled. Read the article here 19:41

(no comments yet) Comment

Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission approves NJ option for summer flounder

New Jersey is one step closer to becoming its own summer flounder management region. The  unanimously approved an option Tuesday during their winter meetings in Virginia to allow for a New Jersey/Delaware Bay management region. It would pull the state out of its present management region which it shares with Connecticut and New York.The New Jersey Marine Fisheries Council must now vote to adopt the measure. The council’s next meeting is March 3. Read the rest here 19:21

(no comments yet) Comment

North Carolina Shrimp fishermen help state researchers gather data

When researchers head out this summer and fall to test gear to reduce NC shrimp, they will do so with an important partner. Area fishermen will be offering up their time and use of their private trawlers to help state researchers gather information on the effectiveness of various gears in reducing bycatch of finfish in trawl nets. Plans are to test three gear options in each the summer and fall shrimp fishery; a task that will involve the use of three trawls each season for about three weeks each. “We’ve budgeted 15 days for each vessel with a goal of 30 tows for each one of the gears,” said Kevin Brown, gear development biologist with the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries. Fishermen and others involved in the shrimp fishery have also had a say in what gears will be tested. Read the article here 14:37
(no comments yet) Comment

Congressman Hunter calls for a ban on some American aid tied to South Pacific Tuna Treaty

This follows the end of the treaty arrangements when the US failed to pay its first quarter levy and the Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency is no longer issuing licences to fish for tuna in the island countries’ waters.Hunter wants the US Congress to stop the US Government using congressionally approved funds as aid to the Pacific countries involved – which includes all the independent island nations in the region. Congress allocates about US$21 million dollars each annually to the US State Department as part of the federal government’s  under the Tuna Treaty. Hunter said it’s important to stress economic assistance does not occur on its own; it had always been tied to United States boats fishing in the Treaty area. Read the rest here 10:59

(no comments yet) Comment

Not Counting Fish – MARCO report woefully lacking info from recreational fishermen

MARCO stands for Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean, and it was created to provide information on all the various uses as well as all the animal and mineral concentrations in the ocean off the Mid-Atlantic coast. Similar councils have been formed to investigate the same things all along the coast of the United States. President Barack Obama issued an executive order asking for this information so future ocean planners can make informed decisions before issuing permits to build windmill farms, or perform ocean mining or oil and gas exploration. These councils are the result of that order. Read the rest here 08:36

(no comments yet) Comment

Conservative Cape Cod scientist announces 2nd run for Congress, hoping to challenge Keating

fishermen do voteA Brown University biology professor calling for tighter border security and less government regulation is taking his second run at the U.S. House of Representatives, announcing plans Thursday to vie for the Republican nomination in the 9th Congressional District. Mark Alliegro, a former senior scientist at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, said securing the country’s southern border is “probably about the top issue” for people he speaks with in the district, which spans Cape Cod and much of SouthCoast. Read the rest here 06:57

1 comment Comment

Todd Fisheries Technology’s first full scale Lobster Hatchery in Kilkeel, Northern Ireland.

Kilkeel-JuvenileThe hatchery is called Seascope and incorporates a visitor centre and oyster hatchery (also manufactured by Todd Fish).  The motivation behind the hatchery was to ensure the locally important lobster fishery was stable and sustainable.  Renowned researcher Professor Paulo Prodohl, from Queens University in Belfast, is working with the hatchery on new research relating to genetics, diet and efficacy of lobster hatcheries.  The North Coast Lobster Fishermen’s Association are also partners and supporters of the project. Read the rest here 20:22

(no comments yet) Comment

NEFMC Newsletter – Council Report

NEFMC SidebarDear Interested Parties: You will find attached the New England Fishery Management Council’s newsletter, the Council Report. It summarizes the actions taken at the Council’s meeting in Portsmouth, NH last week. Click here -> NEFMC Council Rept_Jan2016.pdf .Also, please feel free to contact me with any questions and have a nice weekend. Patricia M. Fiorelli, Public Affairs Officer, New England Fishery Management Council (w) 978.465.0492, ext. 106 (c) 617.548.5786 pfiorelli@nefmc.org 16:45

(no comments yet) Comment

Coast Guard medevacs Fisherman off the coast of Marquesas Keys, Florida

A fisherman was medically evacuated by a Coast Guard search-and-rescue crew north of Marquesas Keys, Florida, Thursday. Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Key West, Fla., received notification from the crew aboard the Capt GC II of a 49-year-old male experiencing shortness of breath 13 nautical miles north of Marquesas Keys. After consulting with the duty flight surgeon, a Coast Guard Air Station Miami MH-65 helicopter crew launched to transport him to urgent medical care. The helicopter crew arrived on scene, hoisted the man and transported him to Key West International Airport where emergency medical services awaited. Watch the video here 13:43

(no comments yet) Comment

Shrimp Task Force discusses penalties for fishing out of season

State officials and district attorneys continue to hammer out stricter penalties for shrimpers. At its meeting today in Houma, the Louisiana Shrimp Task Force continued discussions on its plans to get legislation passed to strengthen the penalties for violators. Currently, shrimpers face fines, revocation of gear licenses, community service and potential jail time if accused of multiple violations. Officials said the issue with the current penalties is that an owner of a vessel with multiple violations can use another licensed captain who does not have violations out on the same boat. Read the rest here 10:58

(no comments yet) Comment

Maine lobster industry wary as warm waters suggest repeat of disastrous 2012 season

For those in the lobster industry, any sign of a return to the conditions of 2012 is cause for high anxiety. Researchers say the industry needs to be prepared for that possibility because warming trends are laying the groundwork for a potential repeat of the disastrous season of four years ago. “We learned a hard lesson in 2012,” said Patrice McCarron, executive director of the Maine Lobstermen’s Association. Because of warm waters in the Gulf of Maine, peak harvesting started in May that year, weeks ahead of schedule. The catch jumped more than 20 percent, from 104 million pounds in 2011 to 127 million pounds in 2012. The shedding season,,, Read the article here 10:29

(no comments yet) Comment

Lobster breeding program is a success

The town’s aquarium is raising lobsters to replenish the fisheries off the coast of Cumbria. When they’re big enough, the baby lobsters are released from a boat into the wild using weighted containers that sink slowly to the sea bed. The lids of the containers are made from paper so the baby lobsters can chew their way through it to freedom.  Mark Vollers, the owner of Lake District Coast Aquarium, said: “There is clearly a strong connection to the mother in the breeding cycle in that if the eggs are taken from her they don’t survive or hatch successfully. “She has to release them when she senses the time is right.  Read the rest here 10:11

(no comments yet) Comment

Sounds of ships and windfarms ‘may alter marine ecosystem’

Underwater sound linked to human activity could alter the behaviour of seabed creatures which play a vital role in marine ecosystems, according to new research. The study found exposure to sounds that resemble shipping traffic and offshore construction results in behavioural responses in certain invertebrate species which live in the marine sediment. These species make a crucial contribution to the seabed ecosystem as their burrowing and bioirrigation activities (how much the organism moves water in and out of the sediment by its actions) are vital in nutrient recycling and carbon storage. Read the rest here 09:54

(no comments yet) Comment

Coast Guard rescue stations in SC, Oregon open till 2018

U.S. Coast Guard helicopter search-and-rescue stations on the South Carolina and Oregon coasts will remain open at least until 2018. Sen. Tim Scott said in a statement Thursday that part of an authorization bill that cleared Congress this week includes keeping the Coast Guard Stations open. The bill was sent to the president to be signed. Losing the Air Facility Charleston and its search-and-rescue helicopter would have serious effects on one of our nation’s critical port cities and adversely impact the safety of mariners, residents and tourists in the Lowcountry,” Scott said. Scott and his fellow South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham worked with Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley of Oregon to keep the facilities open. Read the rest here 08:33

(no comments yet) Comment

LDWC approves fishing regulations out to 9-mile limit

Recreational and commercial fishermen will have no changes in daily nor sized limits and the state will not alter current federal commercial fishing regulations on the use of gear in state waters out to nine miles. The one-year rule pushing state boundary waters out to nine nautical miles from the state’s wildly meandering coastline was given Congressional approval in December. In some cases, state laws governing gear use by commercial fisheries were more strict than federal laws. Thursday, during the state Wildlife and Fisheries Commission’s monthly meeting, the LDWC unanimously approved a resolution to apply state recreational regulations and retain federal commercial fishing regulations out to the nine-mile limit. Read the rest here 07:41

(no comments yet) Comment

Disaster loans opened to California’s Dungeness crab fishermen, businesses

crab loans sbaThe U.S. Small Business Administration announced that low-interest disaster loans are now available to commercial anglers and other businesses affected by the continued closure, which stems from a potentially deadly neurotoxin affecting the fishery. The loans, which max out at $2 million, with 4 percent interest, are the first significant help extended to crabbers, seafood processors and others who have been economically devastated by the foregone season. California crab landings are usually worth about $60 million a year or more.,, It does not appear that deckhands, who often work as contracted employees, would qualify for the business loans. Those workers comprise a group that is among the most desperate amid the crab closure. Read the rest here 06:54

(no comments yet) Comment

More and bigger shrimp boats could be headed Hernando Beach, and neighbors are in an uproar!

427928239_16650463_8colDaniel Ebbecke has told county planners that he wants more intense commercial zoning for his one-third-of-an-acre lot “to eliminate the confusion regarding the use of this property.” His site, on Calienta Street at Gulf Coast Drive, was limited to two shrimp boats years ago by the county, and the current zoning limits the size of boats to 26 feet. Ebbecke is asking for a zoning change to allow up to six boats of up to 45 feet, a request the Hernando County Planning and Zoning Commission is scheduled to hear Monday. Neighbors are opposed to the commercial boat expansion for reasons ranging from noise to seawall and dock damage, traffic issues at Calienta Street and Shoal Line Boulevard, and navigational problems. Read the rest here 16:15

1 comment Comment

Bycatch spike, meeting spur trawl stand down

Gulf of Alaska trawlers are flocking to a meeting in Portland, leaving behind a halibut bycatch situation the North Pacific Fishery Management Council is attempting to fix. The trawlers have complaints with council process, but are also standing down from a halibut bycatch spike resulting from a pollock price dispute with area processors. Industry sources say the stand down was already underway prior to a letter from prominent Gulf of Alaska trawl organizations on Jan. 28 asking for the council-related stand down. Trawl industry representatives said the two stand downs are unrelated. Thirty-four Central Gulf of Alaska trawlers and 19 Western Gulf of Alaska trawlers have agreed not to fish from Feb. 3-6, showing solidarity with those trawlers traveling to Portland to testify at the council meeting. Read the rest here 15:44

(no comments yet) Comment

COAST GUARD RESPONDS TO HELP FISHERMEN STRANDED 45 MILES OFF PORTLAND, ME

450x300_q95The Coast Guard is towing a 65-foot fishing boat with four people aboard Thursday, 45 miles southeast of Portland, Maine. At approximately 7:30 a.m. Wednesday a crew member aboard the fishing boat Jocka used a VHF-FM radio to contact Coast Guard watchstanders to report their engine was disabled and they needed assistance. The crew aboard the 110-foot Coast Guard Cutter Ocracoke, homeported in South Portland, Maine, responded to the hail for help and diverted to assist the stranded fishermen. Read the rest here 13:57

(no comments yet) Comment

Work under way on Endangered Species Act hatchery plans

The National Marine Fisheries Service says it has completed work on plans for 26 Columbia River hatcheries and is actively working on Endangered Species Act review of 32 more, including 16 on lower Columbia tributaries in Washington. The numbers from the federal fishery agency were provided in response to a 60-day notice of intent to sue announced Jan. 13 by the Wild Fish Conservancy, which claims the government is funding Columbia River hatcheries prior to meeting mandated review of plans under the Endangered Species Act. Read the rest here 11:09

(no comments yet) Comment

Video: Coast Guard medevacs injured fisherman 70 miles off Barnegat Light, NJ

The Coast Guard medevaced a 49-year-old man Wednesday 70 miles east of Barnegat Light, New Jersey. Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Delaware Bay in Philadelphia received notification at approximately 9:15 a.m. from the crew of the 77-foot fishing vessel Determination of a crewmember who suffered injuries to his right hand. The fishing vessel Determination is homeported in Rhode Island. Video, Click here  10:49

(no comments yet) Comment

Courtney tells congressional subcommittee that plan would bankrupt Connecticut lobstermen

U.S. Rep. Joe Courtney, D-2nd District told a congressional subcommittee Tuesday that a proposal to transfer control of 155 square miles of federally controlled ocean to Rhode Island and New York jurisdiction would bankrupt Connecticut lobstermen, including those from Stonington and other southeastern Connecticut towns. “This is damaging people’s livelihood and I think we have to be a lot more careful in terms of how we as a Congress treat federal jurisdiction and people’s rights … If the plan passes, Courtney said Connecticut lobstermen would be shut out of fishing in Rhode Island waters because they are not residents while in New York they would have to try and obtain a non-resident permit through a costly auction process. Read the rest here 10:24

(no comments yet) Comment

‘Big Fish, Texas’ Follows Buddy Guindon And His Commercial Fishing Empire

597952067695_597952067695_1080p_2398_BuddysBoys_DMShortBuddy Guindon is no stranger to hard work, having built up his company from only one boat to an entire fleet of boats and building Katie’s Seafood Market, which is named after Buddy’s wife. The entire Guindon family works together like a well-oiled machine in order to maintain and build upon what Buddy started. Buddy Guindon and his family are well known in Galveston, Texas, and he is a respected advocate of the Gulf fishery. Video, Read the article here 08:13

(no comments yet) Comment

Now here’s a true fish story

Those scallops you ate last week — where do you think they came from? China maybe? Most people don’t bother reading the labels on their food. They don’t know where it was grown or caught or packaged and to what bacteria or viruses it may have been exposed during any of those processes. Karter Larson, one of the Larson family of commercial fishermen in Barnegat Light talked about life on the sea and details of how the operation runs, to a standing-room-only crowd on Saturday at the Long Beach Island Foundation of the Arts and Sciences. Read the rest here 07:48

(no comments yet) Comment

Savage quota cuts will finish off the New England small boat groundfish fishery

manatthewheelFishermen and fishing stakeholders say the darkness that has descended on the Northeast groundfish fishery over the past three years is only going to grow deeper in 2016, with some fishing stakeholders envisioning the final collapse of the small-boat industry due to slashed quotas for species they believe are abundant. “We’ve never had a greater gap between what the fishermen are seeing on the water and what the scientists are saying,” Giacalone said. “Never.” Read the rest here, if you can stand it. 06:23

3 comments Comment

The Many Problems With the Proposed Fish Farm in San Diego

If you’ve ever driven north on Interstate 5 and passed through the section with industrial feedlots for cattle, you know the smell. It’s unforgettable. Besides the obvious odor, though, there are serious environmental, animal welfare and human health issues associated with these large-scale meat production facilities. Those issues are similar to environmental concerns about offshore aquaculture – or factory fish farms in the ocean. In Ry Rivard’s Jan. 19 story, “State Probing Experimental Hubbs Fish Breeding Program That’s Spawned Deformities, Mixed Results,” he called attention to the prevalence of disease and deformity in hatchery-raised white seabass in a smaller project run by Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute in Agua Hedionda Lagoon. Read the rest here 22:57

(no comments yet) Comment

Warming ocean may bring major changes for US northeast fishery species

NOAA scientists have released the first multispecies assessment of just how vulnerable U.S. marine fish and invertebrate species are to the effects of climate change. The study examined 82 species that occur off the Northeastern U.S., where ocean warming is occurring rapidly. Researchers found that most species evaluated will be affected, and that some are likely to be more resilient to changing ocean conditions than others. “Our method identifies specific attributes that influence marine fish and invertebrate resilience to the effects of a warming ocean and characterizes risks posed to individual species,” said Jon Hare, a fisheries oceanographer at NOAA Fisheries’ Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC) and lead author of the study. Read the article here 20:00

(no comments yet) Comment

Innovation competition seeks solutions in Nova Scotia’s seafood industry

Louisbourg Seafoods and Cape Breton University have teamed up to launch a competition that aims to crowdsource solutions to problems facing Nova Scotia’s billion-dollar fishing industry. The inaugural SEA++ competition, launched at CBU’s Verschuren Centre for Sustainability for Energy and the Environment last week, has placed more than $5,000 prize money up for grabs. Contestants have until Feb. 9 to register ideas capable of growing NS aquaculture, improving the efficiency, safety and sustainability of the province’s fixed and mobile fishing infrastructure; enhancing how well its fishing industry works at an enterprise level and also boosting its ability to develop and sell new products. Read the articles here 17:10

(no comments yet) Comment

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 38′ H & H Tuna boat, 435HP 8 Cylinder CAT

tn4062_01Specifications, information and 15 photo’s  click here  To see all the boats in this series, Click here 12:19

(no comments yet) Comment

Emergency closure ordered for two Maine scallop fisheries

Maine scallop fisheries in Cobscook Bay and Owls Head will face an emergency closure after Maine’s Department of Marine Resources (DMR) identified a 30% exceeded removal target. The closures will be effective on Saturday, Feb. 6, the DMR said. In addition, harvesting in the St. Croix River will be limited to one day per week for draggers on Wednesdays and one day per week for divers on Fridays during the months of February, March and April 2016. Based on direct input from the Marine Patrol and independent industry participants,,, Read the article here 11:29

(no comments yet) Comment

Bristol Bay backlash after Walker taps Ruffner to replace Johnson on Fish Board

JohnsonGovernor Bill Walker announced five nominations to the state board of Fish and Game on Tuesday. On the list again this year for a Fish Board seat is Robert Ruffner of Kenai, who would replace Fritz Johnson, a commercial fisherman from Dillingham. If confirmed, it will be the first time the Fish Board would not have a member from Bristol Bay. When Governor Bill Walker announced five appointments to the state boards of fish and game on Feb. 2, he named a Soldotna scientist for the seat currently held by Dillingham’s Fritz Johnson. That was a surprise for many in the Bay,,, Audio, Read the rest here 11:02

1 comment Comment

Lobster larvae settlement index shows highs and lows

Scientists and researchers in both Canada and the U.S. are developing a lobster larvae settlement index that could predict “what’s coming down the pipe” for the commercial lobster fishery as far as stocks go. At the University of Maine, Richard Wahle, research associate professor of Marine science, has been studying the America lobster for close to 30 years, collaborating with researchers all along the eastern seaboard to “develop predictive tools for population trends through an understanding of larval transport, settlement and post-settlement processes.” Read the rest here 10:38

(no comments yet) Comment

Legal dispute causing tension between fishing crews in Strait of Belle Isle

A fisherman from Flower’s Cove says the legal dispute over who will benefit from a scallop compensation fund is causing tension in the Strait of Belle Isle area. “Me, I got no bad friends with anyone, but you knows it’s drawing some tension between families and crews,” said Jarvis Walsh. Walsh was in St. John’s to observe the trial in the Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador. Read the rest here 10:26

(no comments yet) Comment

Chinook Salmon: 9 Facts About Oregon’s Official State Fish

The state of Oregon designated the Chinook or king salmon as its state fish in 1961. The newly minted state of Alaska then followed suit in 1962. Here are nine facts about the Chinook salmon that help to explain why it is so important to fishing in Oregon and elsewhere.  1. The Chinook is the biggest of all of the Pacific salmons, growing as long as 53 inches and weighing as much as 126 pounds,,, Read the rest here 09:54

(no comments yet) Comment

Tanner crabbing underway as consolidation adds complications

Fishing industry consolidation has complicated the lives of Tanner crab fishermen and processors, but it looks like they’ll still have access to the whole quota and won’t have to leave 10 percent in the water. Bering Sea commercial crab fisheries are underway, with fishermen catching Tanners at a faster pace than snow crab, according to Miranda Westphal, of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game in Unalaska. And Icicle Seafood’s withdrawal from the crab fishery shouldn’t leave any Tanners “stranded,” thanks to an emergency federal action. Read the post here 08:45

(no comments yet) Comment

The port of Galilee/Point Judith has lost an iconic member, Jack Westcott

forget me notJack B. Westcott, 91, of Charlestown, passed away Monday. He was the husband of Elinor Pinkham and the late Lillian (Holmes) Westcott. He is survived by three sons, his daughter, and many grand, and great grand children. Born in Wakefield, he was a son of the late Charles and Ruth (Champlin) Westcott. Mr. Westcott was a Commercial Fisherman, who worked out of Pt Judith for many years. A celebration of his life will be held, Saturday, February 13 from 12 Noon – 3 pm at George’s of Galilee Restaurant, 250 Sand Hill Cove, Narragansett, RI. In lieu of flowers, family requests memorial donations to the Pt. Judith Fisherman’s Scholarship Fund, PO Box 386, Narragansett, RI 02882. obituary 08:00

(no comments yet) Comment

Wednesday meeting to give update on Ventura Harbor closure

The meeting will be held in the Ventura Marina Mobile Home Park auditorium, 1215 Anchors Way Drive, Harbormaster John Higgins said. Topics to be discussed include the economic losses incurred by commercial fishermen, local businesses and others because of the closure. Port officials blame the Jan. 22 closure on strong ocean currents, El Niño storms and high surf and the resulting large accumulation of sand around the entrance, which has made navigation into and out of the harbor much more perilous. Meeting details, Read the rest here 19:54

(no comments yet) Comment

Regulators Postpone Plan to Try to Preserve Lobsters

Atlantic_States_Marine_Fisheries_Commission_logoInterstate fishing regulators have decided to hold off on starting the process of crafting a plan to try to preserve the dwindling southern New England lobster stock. A board of the  voted Tuesday to postpone authorizing a new management plan for the fishery. A plan could address issues such as trap reductions and closed seasons for lobster fishermen. Southern New England’s lobster fishery is a historic industry in decline. Scientists say the area’s lobster population has sunk to its lowest levels on record. Lobster supply to consumer remains strong because of heavy catch off Maine and Canada. The board decided to postpone the initiation of the plan to allow a technical committee to do more work. It could revisit the issue in May or August. Link 17:48

(no comments yet) Comment

Environmentalists, Fishermen At Odds Over Turning Cashes Ledge Into National Monument

tommy testaverde midnight sunAs some New England fishermen struggle under intense quota cuts, the industry is fearing another political move that could prove to have devastating consequences. There is an effort to designate Cashes Ledge — a historically important fishing area — as a national marine monument. This would require a presidential order and would effectively close the area to all commercial activity. About 80 miles off the coast of Cape Ann, a cold-water kelp forest grows from the tip of a ridge that rises from the ocean floor known as Cashes Ledge. Audio, Read the rest here 17:12

(no comments yet) Comment

North Carolina Fisheries Association Weekly Update for Feb 1, 2016

ncfa 3 finishedClick here to read the Weekly Update, to read all the updates, Click here 16:16

(no comments yet) Comment

Editorial: Time to speak up for commercial fishing

Last week included one of the signature events on the Pacific Northwest’s annual calendar: the setting of spring fishing seasons on the Columbia River. The forecast for the important spring Chinook run is about 300,000 to the river’s mouth, about 28 percent fewer than last year but more than the 10-year average of 285,000. Forecasts are one thing and reality quite another, but there is a good chance that fishermen and the businesses that rely on them will have a fun few weeks from March 1 to April 9. Read the rest here 15:17

(no comments yet) Comment

Non-EU Europe Fishing Fleets: Europe’s Profitable ‘Outsiders’

Smaragd_1HavyardWEB-54815With three species of migrating cod to fish and new commercial species arriving as oceans warm, Norway is a fisheries Valhalla. Yet, recent boat sales suggest the Scandinavian country’s role is changing. Vessel orders and rules in Norway are propping up yards and designers on Europe’s fringes. Medium-sized hull orders for Romanian, Russian and Turkish boat builders are new, while large vessel orders for Denmark or Spain continue apace. Unconventional Icelandic designs, too, are gaining ground here as catches and profits soar. Read the article here 12:04

1 comment Comment

Moving Forward: Fishermen await trial on NOAA monitors mandate

AR-160209902.jpg&MaxW=315&MaxH=315Local fisherman David Goethel said he hopes a court ruling comes soon to determine the legality of a new federal mandate, as he and other fishermen are fearful they will go under before the trial begins. Goethel said he may sell his fishing boat after this summer if the trial isn’t resolved by then. He filed the lawsuit causing the trial, challenging the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s plan to make fishermen pay for their own policing. He filed it in conjunction with a fishing sector based in Massachusetts. While Goethel said he might personally consider retirement this year, he still feels strongly about going forward with the trial to prevent a new precedent for the fishing industry. Read the article here 10:48

(no comments yet) Comment

Environment: Fish gone foul – Male fish developing female sex organs

Wastewater%20TreatmentThe Wallkill River in extreme northern New Jersey is one of the more picturesque locales in the state. So is the Great Swamp in Morris County, a 12-square-mile oasis amid suburbia that was preserved shortly after local activists and officials stopped a plan to build a major airport there about 50 years ago. The seemingly pristine quality of the river and swamp makes it hard to believe that some male fish in both places are developing female sex organs, perhaps because chemical contaminants are altering their hormone systems. The swamp is a national wildlife refuge and the river is part of another refuge. Read the article here 09:27

(no comments yet) Comment

The sound of endangered salmon surviving

Any day now, next time a storm sends a pulse of water down California’s Sacramento River, biologists at the Livingston Stone National Fish Hatchery will release this year’s batch of winter-run Chinook salmon. Of the 400,000 4-inch-long salmon smolts they release, 570 will be emitting a coded sound from a tiny electrical device implanted in their bellies. They’ll beep all the way down the river and, for those lucky enough to make it, out to sea. Winter-run Chinook salmon are critically endangered. They are particularly vulnerable in times of drought, when water levels are low and river temperatures high. With California now in the fourth year of a historic drought — and the state is still in a drought, despite short-term relief from recent storms — winter-run Chinook salmon are in an extremely perilous state. Read the article here 07:11

(no comments yet) Comment

Tyaskins man banned permanently from commercial fishing in Maryland

635899345770030546-Adam-AntesAdam Rodney Antes, 33, of Tyaskin, was found guilty of taking oysters from protected waters over a two year period, over harvesting and harvesting undersized oysters, according to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. He was assessed 60 points on his tidal fishing license, according to DNR, which is nearly double what is required to trigger the revocation hearing process. On Jan. 11, four days before he was given the revocation, Antes was charged with another eight counts of oyster poaching. Officers set up surveillance on the vessel, Kimberly Dawn, tied up near Bivalve Harbor in Wicomico County, after they acted on a tip. They saw piles of oysters on the boat’s deck, according to DNR. Read the rest here 16:27

(no comments yet) Comment

Only 3 percent of juvenile salmon survived California drought in 2015

Only 3 percent of the juveniles of an endangered salmon species survived the drought along the Sacramento River in 2015 despite extraordinary efforts by federal and state officials to save them, federal officials said Monday. It marked the second straight year that the vast majority of juvenile winter-run Chinook salmon were cooked to death on the Sacramento, according to data released by the National Marine Fisheries Service. In 2014, only 5 percent of the juveniles survived. Read the rest here 14:42

(no comments yet) Comment

Fishing Not to Blame for Sea Lion Deaths

(no comments yet) Comment

Connecticut delegation wants state to have input on proposed fishing rules

The state’s congressional delegation has sent a letter to a congressional subcommittee requesting that be allowed to testify on a proposed bill that would transfer 150 square miles of federal fishing grounds to the control of Rhode Island and New York. The legislation would move the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) in Long Island Sound to a new landward boundary between Montauk, N.Y., and Point Judith, R.I. New York Rep. Lee Zeldin introduced the bill which was aimed at striped bass management. The subcommittee is slated to hold a hearing on the bill Tuesday. Read the rest here 11:17

(no comments yet) Comment

Maine Scallop Fishermen ticketed for illegal moorings

Nine people were summoned recently for illegal boat moorings at the Edmunds Boat Launch in Cobscook Bay, the most productive scallop fishing area in the state. The mooring moratoriums, and the lack of space in Eastport, “led us to believe we would be the only game in town and therefore we would be overrun,” Edmunds Harbor Master Heron Weston said last week. As a result, the Washington County commissioners, acting as administrators for the unorganized territory, decided the state-owned property should join the list of other harbors with mooring moratoriums. Read the rest here 08:41

(no comments yet) Comment

A fishy business: Dramm Corp. turns fish scraps into organic fertilizer

Dramm Corp.’s Algoma plant is turning recycled fish scraps into a $2.2 million fertilizer business. The business got its start in the 1990s when Algoma resident Chuck Bowman began gathering dead alewives from the beach and fish offal left by fishermen at the Algoma Marina, turning them into fertilizer in a garage. “The demand for organic fertilizer is increasing,” says Hans Dramm, chief financial officer.  “There are lots of exciting opportunities. Our fertilizer does the right thing by preventing fish remains from filling up a landfill or being washed down a sewer system.” Read the rest here 08:24

(no comments yet) Comment

Jersey Shore Rally Urges Obama Admin to #KillTheDrill, #ProtectOurAtlantic

U.S. Senators Bob Menendez and Cory Booker, and Congressman Frank Pallone (N.J.-06) today were joined by over 100 local leaders, environmental and tourism groups, Jersey Shore business owners and residents at a rally on the Asbury Park boardwalk to demand action to guard the Atlantic against offshore oil and gas exploration. The Obama Administration is currently planning to allow oil production off the coast of Virginia, the Carolinas and Georgia, putting New Jersey’s economy and shore communities at significant risk of a catastrophic oil spill.  The federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) is expected to release its revised plan in the coming weeks. Read the rest here 08:07

(no comments yet) Comment

Disease in herring threatens broader food web

0131_KSLO_HerringTiny herring eggs and larvae are eaten by a multitude of invertebrates, such as crabs and amphipods. They are also important to fish, such as juvenile salmon and smelt, as well as numerous marine and diving birds. As herring grow into juveniles and adults, they enter into the larger food web, including numerous marine mammals, from harbor seals to orcas; vast numbers of birds, from tufted puffins to great blue herons; and a wide variety of fish, from Chinook salmon to halibut. Paul Hershberger, research fisheries biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, has been studying diseases of herring at his lab on Marrowstone Island near Port Townsend. Read the article here 21:22

(no comments yet) Comment

WICKED TUNA: Season Five Premiere on Nat Geo Brings New Challenges, (Video)

This Monday, top-rated series WICKED TUNA is returning to National Geographic Channel for Season Five. Some of the captains are still struggling, with a rough winter season not putting cash in their boats, as fans watched on spin-off series “Wicked Tuna: Outer Banks.” But, Captain Dave Marciano of the Hard Merchandise has plans to pull in the major haul again this season. It won’t be only Captain Dave Marciano striving to prove something this season, however, so he’d better be ready for some competition! Captain Dave Carraro of the FV-Tuna.com had an embarrassing third-place finish last season, Video, Read the rest here 20:16

(no comments yet) Comment

5 rescued from sinking fishing boat off the coast of Yarmouth

canadian coast guardA Coast Guard ship rescued five people from a fishing boat early Sunday morning after they reported the vessel was sinking 16 nautical miles, or about 30 kilometres, off the coast of Yarmouth, N.S.  A spokesman for Joint Task Force Atlantic says the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre in Halifax received a mayday distress call from the  around 11:30 Saturday night. Cpt. Cameron Hillier says JRCC Halifax dispatched a Cormorant helicopter and a Hercules aircraft from 14-wing Greenwood to help with the rescue efforts. He says the group was reported safe and sound at around 1:30 a.m. Read the rest here 16:20

(no comments yet) Comment

North Pacific Fishery Management Council meeting in Portland Oregon, Feb 1thru 9, 2016

Blue NPFMC SidebarThe Council will meet the week of February 1, 2016 at the Benson Hotel, 309 Southwest Broadway in Portland, Oregon. The AGENDA and SCHEDULE are available and will be updated as documents become available. The Council’s meeting will be broadcast live beginning their first day via Adobe Connect HERE. Motions will be posted following the meeting. 15:26

(no comments yet) Comment

Video – Samson ropes live up to their biblical name

blue%20ropeInside a nondescript industrial building on Thornton Street, workers are tending complex machinery that turns wispy skeins of synthetic fiber into ropes robust enough to tie down a seagoing cargo ship or a Mississippi River barge. The workers are at Samson Rope Technologies, a company that can trace its ancestry back to at least the 1880s. During that decade, company founder James P. Tolman patented a rope-braiding machine for his Massachusetts company. After he adopted the name Samson Cordage, Tolman registered a trademark that shows biblical strongman Samson grappling with a lion. The company still uses that trademark today, and outgoing CEO Tony Bon says it’s the oldest such trademark still in use. Read the article here 08:47

(no comments yet) Comment

Alaska commercial halibut quota goes up for first time in 15 years

wrangellAlaska halibut stocks are showing signs of an uptick, and for the first time in 15 years, commercial fishermen’s catches will not be slashed this year. Fishery managers on Friday set the coastwide Pacific halibut harvest at 29.89 million pounds, a . Because halibut paid more than $6 a pound at the docks last year, even a small increase can be lucrative. Bowen said it could push the price for halibut quota share to $60 a pound in major fishing region. That equates to $90,000 for a small lot of 1,500 pounds. Read the article here 08:14

(no comments yet) Comment

‘Criminalising fishermen is one of the most appalling things any Government or body could do to its own people.’

THE criminalisation of fishermen who are simply trying to make a living has got to stop, according to Cllr Michael Collins. The independent councillor tabled a motion calling on the Minister for the Marine, Simon Coveney, to change the laws that are currently being challenged in the High Court.  Speaking at Monday’s meeting of the Western Committee of Cork County Council, Cllr Collins pointed out that two brothers – the owner and the skipper of the Tea Rose trawler that operates out of Castletownbere – are in the process of testing the legality of the Domestic Points Regulations system, which was introduced under the Common Fisheries Policy. Read the rest here 18:17

2 comments Comment

Marine Sanctuaries – Abrolhos Islands fishing ban fails to boost fish population, study finds

Creating a no-take fishing zone in the Houtman Abrolhos Islands has not consistently boosted the populations of some of its most popular fish, a long-term study has found. The research by a group of West Australian scientists challenges the conventional wisdom that marine sanctuaries allow more and bigger fish to flourish. It also raises the possibility that poachers or environmental factors — such as the marine heatwave that affected the area several years ago — are also affecting the populations of fish which are supposed to be protected,,, Read the article here 16:37

(no comments yet) Comment