New Zealand: Regulatory approval of new innovative trawl technology

Fisheries New Zealand has approved the use of the Precision Seafood Harvesting (PSH) Modular Harvest System (MHS) in North Island inshore fisheries for snapper, tarakihi, trevally, red gurnard, and John dory with specific conditions. Stuart Anderson, Director Fisheries Management at Fisheries New Zealand, says innovation in the fishing industry is important to deliver sustainability benefits and is a key step in the journey to shift to higher value products. “In granting this approval Fisheries New Zealand is satisfied that this system performs at least as well as traditional mesh trawl nets, while ensuring sustainability benefits,” says Mr Anderson. >click to read<20:30

GoFundMe Established For Gravely Injured Hampton Bays Man

Matthew Raynor, 29, and a resident of Hampton Bays, was gravely injured in a diving accident doing just that near Towd Point in North Sea.  Matthew is a commercial fisherman, clammer, bayman, world traveler and photographer. According to Jonathan, his older brother by four years, “Matthew is a devotee of nature and is more comfortable and connected outdoors than indoors.” The accident occurred on April 18,,, >click to read<19:34

Jonathan established a GoFundMe page, Help Matthew Raynor recover from a spinal injury. >click here< and please donate if you can.

Ventura Harbor set for dock improvement project

Port district staff announced work on the Ventura Harbor Village Marina Dock Improvement Project would begin in mid-May, allowing the harbor to expand its commercial fishing operations. The anticipated budget is $4.5 million, with upgrades being made to utilities and infrastructure of the dock systems.Ventura Harbor also has a large recreational boating presence, meaning boaters, anglers, commercial fishermen and other watercraft users will have to work a little harder to maintain a fluid co-existence. The harbor is also one of the largest markets for California squid. >click to read<17:27

Florida Digests Worst Stone Crab Season In Decade

Florida’s worst stone crab season in recent memory closed last week marked by a lower-than-normal catch of the flaky, sweet crustaceans in many parts of the state and higher prices for consumers. Co-owner Stephen Sawitz of the iconic Joe’s Stone Crab in Miami Beach, which recently celebrated its 105th season, said his business felt the pinch all season long.,,, Joe’s is a good barometer of the industry,,, Rich Tradition, Red Tide, Frozen Vs. Fresh, New Crab On Menu, >Video, click to read<16:07

US kids aren’t eating enough seafood, study says

American children are eating relatively little fish and shellfish in comparison to meat, according to a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics. The report, published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, explores both the health benefits and the risks associated with eating what once swam in the sea while informing parents of the safest, most sustainable choices for their children. “Seafood consumption by children has declined every year since 2007 to levels not seen since the early 1980s,,, >Video, click to read<13:56

‘It’s Infuriating Us’: New Bedford Fishermen Oppose Vineyard Wind’s $10 Million Compensation Offer

Vineyard Wind CEO Lars Pedersen offered New Bedford fishermen $10million, which includes a direct payout that will be made in annual installments over the next 30 years and a $1 million trust for potential future costs.,,, Daniel Farnham, a New Bedford fisherman, says the proposal doesn’t truly reflect the economic value of the industry. “It’s not just a person catching fish, and selling it and taking that money home. We’re supporting ice houses, fuel barges, packout workers, an entire community is based around this industry and it’s hard to just see that may be taken away and then be offered pennies on the dollar for it and that is what is infuriating to us.” >click to read<11:54

Maine DMR chief briefs Legislature on whales, bait

Department of Marine Resources Commissioner Patrick Keliher briefed the Legislature’s Marine Resources Committee on the latest news from the lobster bait and whale front. The news was not good. Speaking at a May 7 committee workshop, Keliher said the state was under severe pressure from NOAA Fisheries to find ways to reduce the number of vertical lines in the water that connect lobster traps to surface buoys. NOAA seeks a line reduction of more than 60 percent and wants it done soon. >click to read<11:21

SAFMC Recruitment Announcement – Council Executive Director

The South Atlantic Fishery Management Council, headquartered in North Charleston, S.C., is responsible for the conservation and management of fish stocks within the federal 200-mile limit of the Atlantic off the coasts of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and East Florida to Key West. The Council is responsible for Coastal Migratory Pelagics from New York to Florida and for Dolphin/Wahoo, from Maine to Florida. The Executive Director serves as the chief executive officer of the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council and is responsible for managing all administrative and technical aspects of Council operations. >click to read details<10:40

Lobster fishermen report record numbers in Quebec’s Gaspé region

Will the summer of 2019 be a record season for Gaspé lobster? Three weeks into the season, preliminary data suggests that just may be the case.,,,If the trend continues, Lepage will rake in more than 100,000 pounds of lobster. By comparison, the average was 33,000 per fisherman in 2017, which was also considered a record year. Knowing that the price hovers between $6.50 and $7.75 per pound, lobster fishermen are looking forward to a big payout. >click to read<10:24

Good Times

Remember when things were great? Plenty of fish. Plenty of fishing vessels. Money was made, and jobs! Remember when every fishing port did good?
Boothbay, Portland, Gloucester, Boston. All the way down the coast. How about back in the sixties the Boston Fleet and the Auction? Still, fishing vessels like the Ohio, Michigan, and the F J O Hara and others, fished and did well. At the same time the foreign ships were here from Russia,,, >click to read<by Sam Parisi, Gloucester, Ma. 09:22

Blue crab stock healthy with above average abundance

Results from the latest Blue Crab Winter Dredge Survey — conducted annually by the Virginia Institute of Marine Science and Maryland Department of Natural Resources — show the Chesapeake Bay’s blue crab stock remains healthy and able to support quality commercial and recreational harvests. The results — available due to months of field sampling and laboratory analysis by VIMS researchers Mike Seebo, Katie Knick, Gabby Saluta, Alison Smith, and colleagues at Maryland DNR — were announced by the Virginia Marine Resources Commission and Maryland DNR leadership. >click to read<21:22

Salmon researchers seek funds for expanded expedition in 2020

Organizer Richard Beamish, emeritus scientist at Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s Pacific Biological Station in Nanaimo, is seeking $1.5 million from governments, the private sector and non-profit organizations — the same groups that funded his 2019 expedition. Next year’s survey would again be supported by the North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission, an international organization based in Vancouver. The 2019 expedition was a signature project of the International Year of the Salmon program, which is backed by the Anadromous Fish Commission, as well as the North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organization and other partners. >click to read<20:27

‘I’m out of work:’ Open Bonnet Carre Spillway hurts local fisherman

The Bonnet Carre Spillway is currently open to keep the Mississippi River from overflowing and damaging the levee system.  But crab fisherman say there’s another side to the water diversion: The longer it stays open, the more damage it will do to the fishing industry. Fisherman along Lake St. Catherine say this time of the year their traps are usually brimming with crabs, but Saturday when Eyewitness News came to look, most of the traps had been pulled out of the water. >Video, click to read<15:16

MFC draft plan would cut southern flounder harvest

The N.C. Marine Fisheries Commission (MFC) heard a presentation on draft Amendment 2 to the Southern Flounder Fishery Management Plan Friday during its meeting in Jacksonville and voted to send the draft plan to advisory committees and hold a meeting for public comment on June 3 at the Crystal Coast Civic Center in Morehead City. A time has not yet been set. The draft amendment calls for significant management measures for the commercial and recreational fishery and includes significant harvest reductions for southern flounder coast-wide. >click to read<14:31

Assessment Oversight Panel (AOP) meeting for Monkfish, Scup, Bluefish, Black Sea Bass, May 20, 2019,

The Northeast Fisheries Science Center would like to inform you of the 2019 stock assessments.,,, There will be several sets of assessments conducted this year, and the assessment process begins for Scup, Bluefish, Black Sea Bass, and Monkfish on Monday May 20, 2019 with a panel review of scientific information and assessment plans (details below). After this plan review, the assessments will be conducted and later peer reviewed in 2019. Attend In Person, >click to read< or online, >click to register<13:59

Louisiana Shrimp Season to Open May 20 in the Remaining State Outside Waters

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries announced that the portion of state outside waters between the Atchafalaya River Ship Channel at Eugene Island westward to western shore of Freshwater Bayou Canal shall reopen to shrimping at 6:00 a.m. on May 20, 2019.  The area to open is defined as follows: >click to read<10:48

Invasive mussels challenge commercial whitefish fishing in the Great Lakes

Denise Purvis’ family began fishing the waters of northern Lake Huron off Manitoulin Island in 1882. Over the years their operation came to expect the unpredictability of a livelihood dependent on the ability to capture wild fish. Purvis came back to the family business in the mid-1990s after college. Her return home coincided with the arrival of zebra and quagga mussels into the Great Lakes. The mussels have since become synonymous with the problem of invasive species in the Great Lakes. They’ve colonized the lakes and negatively impacted their ecology. For Purvis and the dwindling number of Great Lakes commercial whitefish fishers, the fishery has fallen on hard times. >Video, photo’s click to read<10:28

Alaska’s biggest ever commercial seaweed harvest is happening right now

The biggest commercial seaweed harvest in Alaska history is unfolding this week in waters off Kodiak, one slick blade of sugar kelp at a time. By the end of the two-week harvest, two Kodiak sea farmers expect to haul in a total of 150,000 to 200,000 pounds of kelp. This year’s harvest is at least three times larger than last year’s, said Lexa Meyers, who co-owns Kodiak Kelp Co. Subsistence seaweed harvests have been happening along Alaska’s coastline for millennia. But Alaska’s commercial seaweed industry is only a few years old, and growing fast. >click to read<10:04

By dint of hard work

It’s a story of being in the right place at the right time. But mostly, it’s a success story by dint of a long life of hard work. It shows on Capt. Willy Roe’s face. He’s earned his wrinkles and thinning hair. But there’s a cragginess, a waterman’s weathered visage that tells its own story of too much sun, frigid gales and choppy seas on the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers and creeks. An official old-timer at 85, Roe still is working. >click to read<09:00

‘Get Off The Boat’ — Women In Commercial Fishing Industry Fight Sexual Harassment

When Robin McAllistar worked in the commercial fishing industry in the 1970s and 1980s, she was often the only woman on the boat. Once, she said she was stuck on a boat with a captain who was constantly drinking. She said he assaulted her in her room, and she had to fight him off. “I mean physically grappling and trying to get through and get out and get away,” she said. “I wasn’t raped, but that was only because I got out.” The next day, she hopped onto another boat to get away. Roughly 15% of commercial fishermen in Alaska are women. >click to read<20:23

‘We’re all her sons’: Harbour manager Sheila Eastman is like family to North Lake fishermen

Sheila Eastman is a statistician, an adviser, a traffic cop and sometimes even a nurse to hundreds of fishermen in North Lake, P.E.I. As the longtime harbour manager, she’s helped guide thousands of fishermen for almost two decades in and out of the second largest port in the province. Being responsible for the safe passage of 90 boats making three to four trips each day, she has a big job. And the fishermen have a deep respect and affection for her. “She’s the heartbeat of the harbour of North Lake,”,, >click to read<18:52

Lawsuit against Bristol Bay fish marketing group dismissed

The Bristol Bay Six case against Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association has been dismissed. Alaska Superior Court Judge Yvonne Lamoureux said that the association is within its rights to spend money fighting the Pebble Project, which the association feels could harm the fishery of Bristol Bay. The six fishermen who had sued had said that BBRSDA was working in areas far from its mission, spending some $250,000 of fishermen’s money on contracts with groups opposing the Pebble Project. >click to read<13:55

Mom of doomed Mary B II skipper calls him experienced seaman for whom safety was ‘paramount,’ contradicting other witnesses

In day five of the Coast Guard hearing into the January capsizing of the Mary B II fishing vessel, the mother of the captain described a man vastly different from the one depicted throughout the week by other witnesses. Mary B. Anderson, managing member of the Mary B II LLC, bought the former Bess Chet last fall, after her son, Stephen Biernacki, convinced her it would be a good business opportunity. >click to read<13:06

Gulf of Mexico: Containment System Complete at MC20 Oil Release Site

The U.S. Coast Guard and contractor Couvillion Group have successfully installed a containment system to capture oil leaking from Taylor Energy’s Mississippi Canyon 20 well, despite a lawsuit brought by Taylor to halt the intervention. The installation marks a major milestone in the USCG’s efforts to address the spill, which has been ongoing for 14 years. >click to read<11:18

‘It was like somebody pulled the plug on the drain’

Earlier this year, the San Francisco Port Commission commended a boat captain for safely delivering 23 passengers from danger during a “tidal event,” an honor so rare it hasn’t been bestowed in at least 20 years. Even more unusual is that many questions surrounding the event, which broke chains, nearly sunk a moored boat and endangered lives, remain unanswered. Commendations from the commission have been so infrequent that Port staff were unable to find records detailing when and why the last one was issued. Captain David Crumpler has become the first in recent memory. >click to read<09:15

Cleanup complete after fishing boat catches fire, washes ashore near Bandon

Crews including a helicopter have finished removing major debris left off the Oregon coast after a 64-foot fishing boat caught fire while at sea and later washed ashore. The crew abandoned the Ann Kathleen and was rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard. >click to read<The wood and fiberglass boat caught fire south of Bandon and washed ashore May 2 in a remote area of beach north of Floras Lake at low tide, according to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. >click to read<08:08

Fed up shrimpers may look to state for oversight

Missed payments, cash draws against the future and unpaid bills. Shrimp fishermen and plant workers from Newport to Eureka are feeling the financial pinch as a deadlock with processors continues. “They’ve got to get the plants open,” said Newport shrimper Ted Gibson, a key fisherman’s representative in price talks. “This is really hurting communities financially. I don’t think people have any idea how much money is not coming into Oregon because of this.” Unable to agree on a price for Pacific pink shrimp, some 60 boats are holding fast to the dock,,,>click to read<22:46

Brixham fishing crew honoured with first ever ‘Life Saver Award’ after miracle rescue

It was dark, it was cold, it was stormy with 70knot winds and waves 20ft high when young fisherman Reegan Green was lifted off his feet and washed overboard from a Brixham trawler 25 miles off the Devon coastline. Experienced air and sea rescue personnel who spent an hour looking for Reegan in the dark knew one thing – they had never before pulled a fishermen alive and conscious from the sea in similar conditions. But this time things were different. >click to read<18:01

A declaration to close Herring Area 1A – Effort Control Measures for June – September 2019

The Director of the Division of Marine Fisheries (DMF), with the approval of the Marine Fisheries Advisory Commission, has issued a declaration to close the commercial sea herring fishery in Management Area 1A during the period of June 1 – September 30 (Declaration Notice). During this period, it shall be unlawful to fish for, retain or land any sea herring taken from Management Area 1A without explicit authorization from DMF. The 2,000 pound incidental trip limit no longer applies. >click to read<15:50

Maine lobster fishery agrees to deep cuts to protect whales

After a long and difficult week in late April in which the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration’s Marine Mammal Take Reduction Team met to address protections for the endangered right whale, the Maine lobster fishery now has a sense of what the future holds. There were some hard battles along the way, in which we lobster industry advocates fought to ensure a viable Maine fishery, both for today’s lobstermen and for future generations. By Patrice McCarron >click to read<14:39

Competing interests – “The farmer and the cowman should be friends,” according to Richard Rodgers’ lyrics in “Oklahoma!” Can a similar peace pact be visited upon Maine’s lobstermen and the advocates of whale safety? >click to read<