Tag Archives: Crab

St. Anthony harvesters told they can’t keep their crab

Frustrated crab fishermen gathered outside the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) office in St. Anthony early Wednesday morning. While the crab fishery officially ended on July 30, many harvesters left their final pots of the season in the water until now because of rough weather conditions. Late Tuesday evening, however, fishermen received calls that due to the delay in taking up their pots, any crab caught would have to be thrown back in the ocean. It was the cause of mass frustration that sent over 18 harvesters outside the DFO office the following morning.,,“They’re saying we got to throw away the crab, the crab that were starving for,” said Alyward. “Everybody out there got a couple thousand dollars of bait in those pots, and now we have to throw it all away. It’s pretty sick, that’s what I call that.” click here to read the story 09:10

Newfoundland and Labrador Fishermen don’t agree that crab, shrimp stocks are as bad as scientists say

The province’s fishery appears to be on the brink of a sea change. News over the past couple of months of continually declining snow crab and northern shrimp stocks in waters off Newfoundland and Labrador’s coasts have sent waves of concern washing over the fishing industry. The expected cuts this spring to crab and shrimp quotas have fisherman all around the province on edge. And there’s little else to fill in the gap — the northern cod stocks, while showing signs of strong growth in recent years, are still not ready for a major commercial fishing effort. Lying in the balance are huge investments in vessels and fishing gear, work for boat crews and plants, and the survival of rural areas of the province. But while scientific stock assessments of crab and shrimp reveal a dismal picture, many fishermen are not so sure that picture is accurate. In fact, many say they are seeing things a bit differently out on the water, and see some hope for the fishery of the future if fishermen are willing to branch out into other potential commercial species. click here to read the story 08:50

Louisiana Regulators to Close Blue Crab Fishery for Thirty Days

Crabbing in Louisiana comes to an abrupt halt Sunday night when a state imposed 30-day prohibition goes into effect. In an effort to protect against over-harvesting Louisiana’s crab population, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is shutting it down for a month. Many crab fishermen fear for their livelihood. “Six to eight weeks of no paychecks from crabbing,” said crabber Alvin Royes.”Maybe more depending on the weather. Traps have to be in by midnight Sunday night.” For about 1,500 Louisiana crabbers, that’s it in a nutshell. All crab traps are being picked up and stacked. Sunday night, crab fishermen will be out of work for a while. The 30-day prohibition is not a surprise to Louisiana crab fishermen, even if it is to a lot of other people. Last year, Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries determined too many crabs were being harvested and the crab population was getting low. New regulations were instituted including restrictions on the harvest of immature female blue crabs and the 30-day ban on crabbing, beginning the third Monday in February of 2017, 2018 and 2019. Continue reading the article here 11:52

Central Coast Crab fishermen making sacrifices to protect whales

dungenesscrabIt’s been a rough season for crab fishermen after a domoic acid outbreak kept them out of the water for months. And now that they’re finally allowed to fish, many are choosing to wrap-up early in an effort to protect whales in the Monterey Bay. It’s feeding time for humpback whales but because of the delay in crab season, whales are getting caught in fishing gear that’s normally not in the water this time of year. That’s why crab fisherman, ocean advocacy groups and governmental agencies are teaming up to prevent whale entanglements in the Monterey Bay. “We’re doing everything we can to reduce entanglements and working with the environmental groups and whale disentanglement teams to alter our gear types and ways we fish to reduce entanglements,” said commercial fisherman Walter Deyerle. Read the rest here 18:03

Crab season: West Coast Fishermen scrambling to pay bills

This was supposed to be the winter Braeden Breton finally realized his dream of running his own crab fishing boat. After putting down $7,500 in April toward a commercial permit, he was counting on earning enough money as a deckhand this fall to pay off the rest and begin setting his own traps after the new year. Now the indefinite postponement of the commercial Dungeness crab season has thrown that plan into disarray. Like hundreds of other fishermen in the Bay Area, Breton finds himself scrambling to pay the bills. Read the rest here 10:36

Divide between Newfoundland’s crab fishers, diners is hard to swallow

cod01lf2886Fishermen have been valued members of society since at least the time of the apostle Peter, a fisherman (and fisher of men) who is still the rock of the Catholic Church. Take Newfoundlander Tony Doyle, the vice-president of the , as well as a grandfather of three and survivor of the infamous 1992 cod moratorium. He’s a really great guy – and he’s getting ripped off by the Canadian government. Read the rest here The writer was doing pretty good ’till he used the chefs such as Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall thing! 18:49

Terry McAuliffe says all Maryland crabs are born in Virginia

Maryland crabs, Maryland crab cakes, Maryland crab soup…Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe says it’s all a sham. “You know, Maryland talks about its crabs,” McAuliffe said with a chuckle during a July 21 radio interview. “If anyone from Maryland is listening, I want to make this perfectly clear: All the crabs are born here in Virginia and they end up, because of the current, being taken (to Maryland). So really, they should be Virginia crabs.” No such thing as a Maryland-born crab? Let’s crack this claim open. Read the rest here 12:10

Mississippi: Commercial fishing license renewal begins Tuesday

BILOXI, Miss.— The state will begin renewing commercial fishing licenses Tuesday and selling new commercial licenses starting April 15. Commercial fishermen who live in Mississippi can purchase licenses to catch shrimp, crab, fish, oysters and live bait, as well as business licenses for dealers and processors. The fees for Mississippi residents range from $10 to $500, and some fishermen require more than one license. Fees for out-of-state residents vary. Read more here  08:57

NPFMC talks crab, halibut bycatch

SEATTLE — The North Pacific Fishery Management Council spent much of the day talking about Bering Sea bycatch, and agreed to move forward on one related discussion paper…The council also heard extensive public testimony on halibut bycatch in that same region this afternoon. Action is expected on that issue Saturday morning, with the advisory panel recommending another draft of the halibut bycatch discussion paper. Read more from Molly Dischner @alaskajournal.com     The meeting will be broadcast LIVE at npfmc.webex.com.  08:16

Made in NC: Swan Quarter seafood company survives despite challenges

SWAN QUARTER    There was a steady pulse on the crab picking floor at Mattamuskeet Seafood in Swan Quarter last Tuesday morning. [email protected]

Crab prices unfair, fishermen say – Boats remain tied up to protest crab prices. Their pissed!

This crab season opened up to a rocky start this week with fishermen upset over the price of crab. Harvesters are angry that the price-setting panel sided with processors in establishing the price at $1.83 per pound. continued Listen to the call in discussion about this issue here with John Furlong and Union Chief  Earl McCurty. audio here

New Seafood Board has Big Job Representing $2.4 Billion Industry

by Springfield Lewis/Louisiana Seafood News – The 12 new members of the Louisiana Seafood Promotion and Marketing Board inherit an organization proven many times over as an advocate for the state’s commercial fishing community – in good times and especially bad. They begin their terms representing six distinct industries: crab, finfish, oysters, shrimp, alligator and crawfish. And as diverse as those industries might be, the board’s overall effectiveness will come down to its ability to work together to benefit the entire community of 12,000+ fishermen. continued

National Fisheries Institute – Top Ten List, a Familiar School of Fish

10 Most Popular Make up More than 90% of the Fish Eaten

Washington, DC – September 24, 2012  –  From Canned Tuna to Cod the top ten most consumed seafood items by Americans are a very familiar group that feeds a growing market.

The federal government recently reported that the overall seafood volume was 4,650,000,000 pounds.  The data also showed American seafood companies exported a record 3.3 billion pounds valued at $5.4 billion.

http://www.aboutseafood.com/press/press-releases/nfi-top-ten-list-familiar-school-fish