Tag Archives: Crab

After a yearlong closure, Tanner crab season makes a comeback off Kodiak Island

Dave Kubiak spent a recent rainy Thursday stacking the deck of his boat, the Laura Lee, with crab pots in preparation for Kodiak’s Tanner crab season. According to him, the night before the season is always exciting. “We’ll leave in sufficient time to get there and to go someplace and anchor up,” he said. “And then wait for the morning and then run out and get all nervous and jittery on the opener, which is silly, but we do.” Kubiak said that he got a nickel per pound for Tanner crabs back in the 60s. Due to low supply and high demand across the country, prices for this season, which opens Jan. 15, are much higher,,, >click to read< 09:20

Premium prices no problem for shrimp, crab, lobster consumers

Global supply chain issues are affecting supplies of some crustaceans sold in US grocery stores, and driving some prices up, but consumers seem willing to pay extra for their “must have” shrimp, crab, lobster and other products.  “Red king crab availability is very tight, so look for more snow crab or even golden king crab in its place,” Shrimp is far and away the best-selling seafood item in the United States, and Amdahl doesn’t see that changing anytime soon.,, Despite the logistics headaches that are slowing shipments of foods worldwide, US retailers can expect to have volumes of a variety of crustacean products from Norwegian fisheries,,, >click to read< 10:38

Local man takes pride in delivering fresh seafood to our people

Blake Baudoin operates Baudouin Seafood with his wife Beth. Together, the family offers crabs, crawfish and shrimp seasonally to both wholesale distributors and also to members of the community. The work isn’t easy. But Blake Baudoin said it’s a passion, and that there’s no better feeling than delivering a fruitful catch to a satisfied customer. He said he believes he’s a good trapper because of the passion he has for doing the best for his customers. “I’d say I’m good at my work because I’m dedicated, a very hard worker and I never give up,” Baudoin said. “But most of all, I love what I do.” >click to read< 08:47

‘We won’: Clearwater Seafoods deal gives Mi’kmaq control of lucrative ocean stretch

Early this week, leaders of the Membertou and Miawpukek First Nations, both of which are Mi’kmaq communities, reached an agreement to buy Nova Scotia-based Clearwater Seafoods in a deal worth C$1bn (£580m). Heralded as the “single largest investment in the seafood industry by any Indigenous group in Canada”, the landmark deal comes at a critical moment for Indigenous communities in the region, as tensions remain high over their treatied fishing rights. >click to read< 15:48

Bering Sea Crab harvests set: Kings still in decline, snow and Tanner see bump

Commercial fishermen will be allowed to harvest a total of 45 million pounds of snow crab from the Bering Sea waters this year, with 4.5 million of that set aside for Community Development Quota groups and the rest for individual fishing quota, or IFQ, holders. That’s about 34 percent larger than the limit last season, which was also an increase over the previous year. Bering Sea Crabbers Association Executive Director Jamie Goen said that’s good news for the fleet. However, members of the fleet also think that TAC could have been a lot higher had the National Marine Fisheries Service been able to conduct its regular surveys. >click to read< 08:29

Western Australia’s Crystal crabs immune to impact of coronavirus, selling for more than $300

The crabs are found in a thin trench of water, 80 kilometres off the Western Australia coast, at depths of 800 metres. West Coast Deep Sea Fishery takes to the pristine deep waters all year round in search of the product. Managing director Glen Bosman said he believed he had the best crystal crabs in the world. “Not arguably, it’s fact. We receive the highest price for that species of crab,” he said. The crystal crab is pale white in colour, with distinctly shorter walking legs, and can weigh more than two kilograms. “The crab sits in the middle of the table, is broken up, and then shared by a number or people because of its size. >click to read< 09:55

Lady Sophie – Focus on shellfish

Made to harvest for shellfish for Grimsby company Fastline Shellfish, Lady Sophie has been built in Padstow to a new 12 metre design. Owners Fastline Shellfish are a family-owned business that has bee trading on the Grimsby docks since 2009, although the Kenyon family’s roots in the fishing industry go back a long way. Aiming to supply top-quality fresh shellfish, the focus is on cutting short the supply chain by catching its own crabs, lobsters and whelks, which are processed and supplied through the Fastline shop. video, photo’s, >click to read< 09:42

Seafood Connect! Maine Fishermen hold events to get products direct to customers

It’s first come, first served this weekend at Maine’s Working Waterfront – Seafood Connect event. In the midst of everything happening in the world, the local fishing community has been hit hard. This event will feature fresh seafood at an “off the boat” price. Any fisherman who is legal to sell is welcome. No preorders. Fishermen will decide what/if they are selling each week. As of May 4, the group will be switching from the Rockland location to the Reny’s in Camden. Bring bags to take your seafood home. Names, phone numbers, locations, product diversity! >click to read< 09:21

Crab-price talks set to continue Saturday – processors initially pushed for an open ticket

A fleet leader said Friday night that “We have only one price offer on the coast of $2.75. Fishermen will be continuing talks tomorrow [Saturday] with hopes the processors will come out with a more realistic price offer under current market conditions.” Crabbers are urging an opening price of $3.25, while processors initially pushed for an open ticket, meaning they could pay whatever they determine to be appropriate after crab are delivered. In Northern California, where the season opened on Dec. 15,,, >click to read< 10:09

Rope free traps? Company studies ways for fishing nets and whales to coexist.

“It’s promising and many people are asking why we don’t use it right away — but it’s still in the scientific testing phase, with tests being done in the water and it has not yet been adapted for commercial fishing,” Cormier explained. In some trials, the buoy took up to 30 minutes to surface; in other cases it never surfaced. “There is still work to be done as far as the reliability of the equipment,” he said. “We don’t want to create another problem, that of ghost fishing.” >click to read< 09:49

Refusing to Leave! St. Bernard fisherman in Washington, DC to make their case for millions in federal aid

Fishermen and elected leaders from St. Bernard Parish are refusing to leave Washington, DC without $150 million in federal disaster aid, funded through a federal fisheries disaster declaration. They say repeat openings of the Bonnet Carre spillway has flooded the coast with fresh water that seafood cannot tolerate. St. Bernard Parish President Guy McInnis said the openings are destroying the $4 billion regional seafood industry and the money would be used to subsidize fishermen, repair fishing grounds and coastal waters. >click to read< 08:35

PETA is coming after Baltimore’s beloved crab

The animal rights group selected the local crustacean as the mascot for its latest pro-vegan campaign. A billboard in Baltimore pictures a crab with the words, “I’m me, not meat. See the individual. Go vegan.” Danielle Ohl, a reporter for the Capital Gazette, tweeted a picture of the billboard Thursday, and it set off some strong reactions. Locals took to Twitter to share their reactions to the billboard that was erected yesterday on the corner of East Baltimore Street near the Shot Tower. Jimmy’s Famous Seafood chimed in, too. “I thought it was fake, honestly,” said Tony Minadakis, owner of the restaurant. “I was shocked. It was pretty tone-deaf.”>click to read<08:58

California State legislators to meet in Eureka to discuss future of crab, salmon fisheries

With the California crab season opener approaching and a poor salmon season winding down, a California legislative committee is set to meet in Eureka on Friday to discuss what the future holds for two of the North Coast’s most important fisheries. The Joint Committee on Fisheries and Aquaculture hearing is set to touch upon everything from whale entanglements in crab gear and the recent lawsuit filed related to them; the potential for a federal disaster declaration for California’s and Oregon’s 2017 salmon season; and crab fishing rules and recent test results on how toxic algae blooms are affecting crab this year. click here to read the story 09:02

St. Anthony harvesters told they can’t keep their crab

Frustrated crab fishermen gathered outside the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) office in St. Anthony early Wednesday morning. While the crab fishery officially ended on July 30, many harvesters left their final pots of the season in the water until now because of rough weather conditions. Late Tuesday evening, however, fishermen received calls that due to the delay in taking up their pots, any crab caught would have to be thrown back in the ocean. It was the cause of mass frustration that sent over 18 harvesters outside the DFO office the following morning.,,“They’re saying we got to throw away the crab, the crab that were starving for,” said Alyward. “Everybody out there got a couple thousand dollars of bait in those pots, and now we have to throw it all away. It’s pretty sick, that’s what I call that.” click here to read the story 09:10

Newfoundland and Labrador Fishermen don’t agree that crab, shrimp stocks are as bad as scientists say

The province’s fishery appears to be on the brink of a sea change. News over the past couple of months of continually declining snow crab and northern shrimp stocks in waters off Newfoundland and Labrador’s coasts have sent waves of concern washing over the fishing industry. The expected cuts this spring to crab and shrimp quotas have fisherman all around the province on edge. And there’s little else to fill in the gap — the northern cod stocks, while showing signs of strong growth in recent years, are still not ready for a major commercial fishing effort. Lying in the balance are huge investments in vessels and fishing gear, work for boat crews and plants, and the survival of rural areas of the province. But while scientific stock assessments of crab and shrimp reveal a dismal picture, many fishermen are not so sure that picture is accurate. In fact, many say they are seeing things a bit differently out on the water, and see some hope for the fishery of the future if fishermen are willing to branch out into other potential commercial species. click here to read the story 08:50

Louisiana Regulators to Close Blue Crab Fishery for Thirty Days

Crabbing in Louisiana comes to an abrupt halt Sunday night when a state imposed 30-day prohibition goes into effect. In an effort to protect against over-harvesting Louisiana’s crab population, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is shutting it down for a month. Many crab fishermen fear for their livelihood. “Six to eight weeks of no paychecks from crabbing,” said crabber Alvin Royes.”Maybe more depending on the weather. Traps have to be in by midnight Sunday night.” For about 1,500 Louisiana crabbers, that’s it in a nutshell. All crab traps are being picked up and stacked. Sunday night, crab fishermen will be out of work for a while. The 30-day prohibition is not a surprise to Louisiana crab fishermen, even if it is to a lot of other people. Last year, Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries determined too many crabs were being harvested and the crab population was getting low. New regulations were instituted including restrictions on the harvest of immature female blue crabs and the 30-day ban on crabbing, beginning the third Monday in February of 2017, 2018 and 2019. Continue reading the article here 11:52

Central Coast Crab fishermen making sacrifices to protect whales

dungenesscrabIt’s been a rough season for crab fishermen after a domoic acid outbreak kept them out of the water for months. And now that they’re finally allowed to fish, many are choosing to wrap-up early in an effort to protect whales in the Monterey Bay. It’s feeding time for humpback whales but because of the delay in crab season, whales are getting caught in fishing gear that’s normally not in the water this time of year. That’s why crab fisherman, ocean advocacy groups and governmental agencies are teaming up to prevent whale entanglements in the Monterey Bay. “We’re doing everything we can to reduce entanglements and working with the environmental groups and whale disentanglement teams to alter our gear types and ways we fish to reduce entanglements,” said commercial fisherman Walter Deyerle. Read the rest here 18:03

Crab season: West Coast Fishermen scrambling to pay bills

This was supposed to be the winter Braeden Breton finally realized his dream of running his own crab fishing boat. After putting down $7,500 in April toward a commercial permit, he was counting on earning enough money as a deckhand this fall to pay off the rest and begin setting his own traps after the new year. Now the indefinite postponement of the commercial Dungeness crab season has thrown that plan into disarray. Like hundreds of other fishermen in the Bay Area, Breton finds himself scrambling to pay the bills. Read the rest here 10:36

Divide between Newfoundland’s crab fishers, diners is hard to swallow

cod01lf2886Fishermen have been valued members of society since at least the time of the apostle Peter, a fisherman (and fisher of men) who is still the rock of the Catholic Church. Take Newfoundlander Tony Doyle, the vice-president of the , as well as a grandfather of three and survivor of the infamous 1992 cod moratorium. He’s a really great guy – and he’s getting ripped off by the Canadian government. Read the rest here The writer was doing pretty good ’till he used the chefs such as Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall thing! 18:49

Terry McAuliffe says all Maryland crabs are born in Virginia

Maryland crabs, Maryland crab cakes, Maryland crab soup…Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe says it’s all a sham. “You know, Maryland talks about its crabs,” McAuliffe said with a chuckle during a July 21 radio interview. “If anyone from Maryland is listening, I want to make this perfectly clear: All the crabs are born here in Virginia and they end up, because of the current, being taken (to Maryland). So really, they should be Virginia crabs.” No such thing as a Maryland-born crab? Let’s crack this claim open. Read the rest here 12:10

Mississippi: Commercial fishing license renewal begins Tuesday

BILOXI, Miss.— The state will begin renewing commercial fishing licenses Tuesday and selling new commercial licenses starting April 15. Commercial fishermen who live in Mississippi can purchase licenses to catch shrimp, crab, fish, oysters and live bait, as well as business licenses for dealers and processors. The fees for Mississippi residents range from $10 to $500, and some fishermen require more than one license. Fees for out-of-state residents vary. Read more here  08:57

NPFMC talks crab, halibut bycatch

SEATTLE — The North Pacific Fishery Management Council spent much of the day talking about Bering Sea bycatch, and agreed to move forward on one related discussion paper…The council also heard extensive public testimony on halibut bycatch in that same region this afternoon. Action is expected on that issue Saturday morning, with the advisory panel recommending another draft of the halibut bycatch discussion paper. Read more from Molly Dischner @alaskajournal.com     The meeting will be broadcast LIVE at npfmc.webex.com.  08:16

Made in NC: Swan Quarter seafood company survives despite challenges

SWAN QUARTER    There was a steady pulse on the crab picking floor at Mattamuskeet Seafood in Swan Quarter last Tuesday morning. [email protected]

Crab prices unfair, fishermen say – Boats remain tied up to protest crab prices. Their pissed!

This crab season opened up to a rocky start this week with fishermen upset over the price of crab. Harvesters are angry that the price-setting panel sided with processors in establishing the price at $1.83 per pound. continued Listen to the call in discussion about this issue here with John Furlong and Union Chief  Earl McCurty. audio here

New Seafood Board has Big Job Representing $2.4 Billion Industry

by Springfield Lewis/Louisiana Seafood News – The 12 new members of the Louisiana Seafood Promotion and Marketing Board inherit an organization proven many times over as an advocate for the state’s commercial fishing community – in good times and especially bad. They begin their terms representing six distinct industries: crab, finfish, oysters, shrimp, alligator and crawfish. And as diverse as those industries might be, the board’s overall effectiveness will come down to its ability to work together to benefit the entire community of 12,000+ fishermen. continued

National Fisheries Institute – Top Ten List, a Familiar School of Fish

10 Most Popular Make up More than 90% of the Fish Eaten

Washington, DC – September 24, 2012  –  From Canned Tuna to Cod the top ten most consumed seafood items by Americans are a very familiar group that feeds a growing market.

The federal government recently reported that the overall seafood volume was 4,650,000,000 pounds.  The data also showed American seafood companies exported a record 3.3 billion pounds valued at $5.4 billion.

http://www.aboutseafood.com/press/press-releases/nfi-top-ten-list-familiar-school-fish