Tag Archives: red king crab

Crabbers receiving record prices for low catch

The year’s first red king crab fishery at Norton Sound has yielded 17,000 pounds Alaska crabbers are hauling back pots from the Panhandle to the Bering Sea, and reduced catches are resulting in record prices for their efforts. The year’s first red king crab fishery at Norton Sound has yielded 17,000 pounds so far of its nearly 40,000 pound winter quota for more than 50 local fishermen. The crab, which are taken through the ice near Nome, are paying out at a record $7.75 a pound. A summer opener will produce a combined catch of nearly half a million pounds for the region. Red king crab from Bristol Bay also yielded the highest price ever for fishermen, averaging $10.89 per pound. That catch quota of 8 million pounds was down 15 percent from the previous season. The Bering Sea snow crab fleet has taken 80 percent of its 19 million pound quota, down by nearly half from last year. That’s pushed market prices through the roof, topping $8.30 a pound at wholesale in both the U.S. and Japan, compared to over $5.50 per pound a year ago. continue reading the article here 13:56

Bristol Bay Red King Crab Fishery Starts Strong Despite Low Stock Assessment

The red king crab fishery is off to a booming start in Bristol Bay, despite predictions of a down season. The fleet has caught two-thirds of its quota in just a dozen days, and managers say fishermen are unloading big, beautiful crab at the dock. Gordon Christiansen is a commercial fisherman with more than 40 years of experience in Bering Sea. This season, he said the crab were especially voracious eaters, quick to fill the pots dropped by his crew on the F/V Aleutian Mariner. “From the time we set pots in the water, we were done in 60 hours,” said Christiansen. “It was amazing, tremendous fishing. We’d like to go out again and do it again tomorrow.” Having already harvested their 120,000-pound allocation, his seven-vessel fleet is finished for the season. The average crab from their haul weighed just over seven pounds — a half-pound larger than normal, according to Christiansen. Read the story here 09:07

Lost crab pots still catching king crab in Kodiak Island bay

Derelict crab pots lost on the bottom of a Kodiak Island bay are capturing significant numbers of its king crab, according to scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Abandoned pots, the traps used by fishermen to catch crab, could be killing 16 to 37 percent of the red king crab with shells longer than 40 millimeters in Womens Bay, they concluded in a study. Pots likely were lost when lines were cut by boat propellers, commercial barge towing bridals or ice, the researchers concluded. They also could be lost if floats tied to the pots sank. Read the rest here 20:51

Booming Season Ahead for Bering Sea Crab Fisheries

Total allowable catches set for Bering Sea tanner crab, red king crab and St. Matthew Island blue king crab for the season opening Oct. 15 are bound to keep harvesters real busy. The tanner crab quota for the Eastern Bering Sea is 8,480,000 pounds, with 7,632,000 pounds allocated to holders of individual fishing quota and 848,000 pounds for community development quota groups,, Read the rest here 19:06

Data show stocks on the rise in Bering Sea

Alaska’s pollock numbers may be at the highest level since 1982. Alaska’s conservative management combined with the grace of Mother Nature are swelling the abundance of two of the state’s largest and most important fisheries. Bering Sea crab scientists and stakeholders met last week to discuss the outlook,,, Read more here 14:46

Golden king crab stocks around Aleutians thriving

Amidst the salmon fisheries starting up all across the state, several Alaska crab seasons also get underway each summer.  In mid-June, the summer Dungeness crab fishery opens in the Panhandle, as does red king crab at Norton Sound. Those are followed in August by golden kings along the far flung Aleutian Islands, which might soon take the title as Alaska’s largest king crab fishery. continued @ SitNews