Tag Archives: seafood industry

Florida Keys seafood industry begins gear recovery after Hurricane Irma

To find the lobster, Florida Keys commercial fishers must first track down gear scattered or destroyed by Hurricane Irma. “Just like on shore, the underwater has patterns of destruction,” Bill Kelly, executive director of the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association, said Thursday. “Some areas have suffered major devastation, really hard hit,” he said. “Other areas are not so bad.” One large Middle Keys family operation estimates having lost 6,000 traps, Kelly said. click here to read the story 11:00

Seven Years Later, Deepwater Horizon Still Spilling Into Legal System

The BP oil spill has faded from the global headlines, but seven years later, the effects on residents of the Gulf Coast and the legal system nationwide are far from over. While the journey has been long and difficult, there are lessons for those injured and their lawyers. The Deepwater Horizon Claim Center will likely shut down this year after paying an estimated $13 billion in individual and business claims for economic and property damages. As it does, payments from related settlements, this time with Halliburton Energy Services Inc., Trans-Ocean Offshore Deepwater Drilling Inc. and other defendants, will start. Thousands of claimants are expected to divide $1.24 billion.,,, Those in the seafood industry received $2.3 billion in compensation for business and economic losses. Of that, $520 million was not paid until late last year, which means some people waited six-and-a-half years to receive all of their money. click here to read the story 11:40

The Elson decision – Ruling that prevents corporate takeover of inshore fishery faces appeal

The Newfoundland and Labrador seafood industry is behind an appeal of a recent Federal Court of Canada decision that upheld Ottawa’s right to prevent the corporate takeover of inshore fisheries in Atlantic Canada and Quebec. The June 5 appeal was filed at the 30-day deadline. No court date has yet been set to hear the appeal. Last month, Justice Cecily Strickland ruled the federal fisheries minister was entitled to strip fishing licences from Labrador fisherman Kirby Elson. Elson was a placeholder on a snow crab licence controlled by two related Newfoundland processing companies. The Elson decision was hailed as a victory by some inshore fisheries organizations and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. They argue controlling agreements are used by companies to get around longstanding policies that local fishermen control inshore licenses and the profits that come from them. click here to read the story 11:46

 

Fund compensating Newfoundland seafood industry could resolve one of the final obstacles to CETA deal

With the United States poised to adopt a more protectionist trade policy under President-Elect Donald Trump, some good news for supporters of Canada’s major trade deal with the European Union could come this week. A decision is expected soon on compensation for businesses in Newfoundland and Labrador that would lose out due to provisions in the recently-signed Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) — one of the last potential causes of a hold-up on the Canadian side of the deal. A Liberal source said Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has been discussing a special fisheries fund with Premier Dwight Ball and an announcement could come as soon as later this week. Read the rest here 19:31

Fate of Apalachicola Bay, seafood industry, could hang on upcoming Supreme Court test

thDER19RM8A special master of the U.S. Supreme Court has scheduled a trial for Oct. 31 in Florida’s lawsuit against Georgia over the river system they share — and with the latest in a series of droughts threatening, downstream users say the fate of the Apalachicola Bay could well be at stake. “That last drought we had — if we get just half of that, this bay may never be able to rebuild itself,” said Shannon Hartsfield, president of the Franklin County Seafood Workers’ Association. Florida sued Georgia in 2013, contending that Georgia’s overconsumption of water had reduced freshwater flows from the top of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin, near metro Atlanta, to the Florida Panhandle, home of the Apalachicola Bay. Georgia denies it, arguing that Florida’s mismanagement of the bay is to blame for its woes. The Apalachicola Bay’s seafood industry was once a formidable economic driver for the region, producing 90 percent of Florida’s oysters and 10 percent of the nation’s supply. Its commercial and recreational fishing industries generated $200 million a year and supported 85 percent of the local population. But no more. Read the story here 13:17

For Shetlanders the sea is a natural environment, but never a friendly one

Most people in Shetland live and work within sight and sound of the sea. On clear summer days – almost 20 hours long, in June – it lies flat out to a distant horizon and children play on great wide beaches; from the cliff-tops, fish and diving birds are clearly visible even several metres below the surface. It’s not like that now. At this time of year and into the winter, during the great gales that sweep across the Atlantic, the sea climbs steeply into the howling wind as it hits land, and sheets of spray sweep across our fields and moors. Read the rest here 11:34

Seafood industry backs Catholic Charities North Fishing Community Fund

More than 30 companies and individuals combined to donate more than $35,000 to Catholic Charities North Fishing Community Fund. Boston-based Sailors’ Snug Harbor foundation made the largest donation — $10,000 to the fishing community fund. Other major donors included American Seafoods, Arista Industries, Bama Seafoods Products, CB Richard Ellis, Elite Seafood, Espersen, High Liner Foods, Harbor Seafoods, Ipswich Shellfish, Northern Ocean Marine, Proteus Industries, Mark Leslie and William Canty. Other contributors include American Refrigeration, Eastern Fish, GE Foundation, H&M Bay, Label Print America, Polar Seafood, Preferred Freezer Services and Santander Bank. Read the rest here 08:21

Report: $1.2 billion of output from Southcentral fishing

Seafood employs more people in Southcentral than mining in the entire state, pays out more in Anchorage than construction, and has enough management and logistics infrastructure in Anchorage to rival that of Seattle, according to a new report. According to the report, the seafood industry is a major engine for Southcentral Alaska, with 2,168 active commercial fishing permits, 35 processing plants, and three salmon hatcheries working to produce $1.2 billion of total economic output for the region. Read the rest here 13:31

Seafood industry, trade minister bullish on CETA fallout

The recently signed free trade deal between Canada and the European Union should boost seafood exports and create more jobs in fishing communities, according to Trade Minister Ed Fast. [email protected] 10:02

Gulf oil spill’s effects still has seafood industry nervous

Three years after the Deepwater Horizon disaster, the Gulf of Mexico seafood industry is still holding its breath and expecting the worst. After all, sick fish are still turning up off Louisiana. Scientists are still probing potential problems with crabs and shrimp. “There’s still a lot of nervousness,” said Bob Jones of the Southeastern Fisheries Association, a commercial fishing trade group based in Tallahassee. continued