Local leaders encouraged by water wars arguments in U.S. Supreme Court hearing

Florida lawyers fared well in last week’s U.S. Supreme Court hearing on the “water wars” between the state and Georgia, officials who sat through the hearing said. Rep. Neal Dunn, who was among them, said he felt Florida has a real shot of winning the case.,, “Georgia came off some pretty harsh questioning – a lot of harsh interrogatories, and a lot of apparent disbelief on the part of the justices in what they were hearing from Georgia.”,,, Florida says a steady supply of water is the last chance for Apalachicola Bay’s struggling oyster industry and endangered species. >click here to read< 17:45

Dutch trawlers may face pulse fishing ban as EU parliament says no

The European parliament on Tuesday voted in favour of a ban on pulse fishing, a decision which it will use in negotiations with the European Commission and which will have a major impact on the Dutch fishing industry, if implemented. Opponents of the system say it is a cruel and unnecessary method of fishing. It involves sending a current of electricity through sections of the sea bed, partially stunning sole and plaice and forcing some into the net. >click here to read< 16:49

World’s largest sea turtle could come off ‘endangered’ list

An arm of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has received a petition from a fishing group asking that the Northwest Atlantic Ocean’s leatherback sea turtles be listed as “threatened,” but not endangered, under the Endangered Species Act.,,, NOAA officials have said the agency has reviewed the petition from New Jersey-based Blue Water Fishermen’s Association and found “substantial scientific and commercial information” that the move might be warranted. The agency now has about eight months to make a decision about the status of the turtles. >click here to read< 13:56

Nautic Alert to Safeguard Commercial Fisherman and Assets With Their New Upcoming VMS Type-Approved Insight X2

Nautic Alert just unveiled one of the most technologically-advanced marine monitoring, tracking, safety and security system designed specifically for yachts, and now has some really exciting news for commercial fisherman. Nautic Alert will be releasing a VMS type-approved Insight which will not only bring NOAA tracking to fisherman, but also unmatched security and safety protection with the industry’s first SMART bilge controller, microwave and radar-based intrusion detection, and man-overboard with global emergency monitoring. Nautic Alert is an EDGE-based system with onboard learning intelligence designed to provide early detection of critical systems. >click here to read< 13:16 

Western Gulf fishermen bristle at other P.E.I. fisheries group resolution

The Western Gulf Fishermen’s Association has answered back to the Prince County Fishermen’s Association. Last week the PCFA voted in favour of a sending a motion to the annual meeting of the Prince Edward Island Fishermen’s Association next month in Charlottetown, calling on all lobster advisory committees in the province to work towards a uniform lobster carapace size. >click here to read< 11:43

Super-Sjark seine netter for Lofoten

Rolf-Inge Johansen ordered the new vessel from Sletta Verft, having sold his previous 1977-built, 38 metre Hellodden in 2016 to a Spanish company to fish off western Africa. Its replacement is a compact 14.90 metre LOA by 6.50 metre beam seine netter of the same name. The new Hellodden follows the current trend in Norway for compact fishing vessels under 15 metres, with a large beam and plenty of height, providing a fishing platform that would previously have only been possible with a considerably larger vessel. >click here to read< 11:11

Board votes down change in Southeast Dungeness crab season

Crabber Max Worhatch proposed the change and successfully got the board to add the proposal to the meeting after missing the deadline for regulation changes.“I would like to seriously consider this,” Worhatch told the board. “I put a proposal in, just like this three years ago, didn’t get anywhere. The department felt like they had to have something to manage the fishery when it got to the low end. But in my experience and just from what I’ve seen in Oregon, California and Washington, size sex and season for Dungeness crab works and it works extremely well. It’s kindof an autopilot thing, doesn’t take a lot of work.” >click here to read< 10:22

Maine Lobstermen reject big changes in harvester reporting rules

Ask any lobsterman about the details of where and how he catches his bugs — what kind of bait he uses, how deep he sets his gear, how many traps on a trawl, how long those traps soak between hauls — and you’re likely to get a fisheye, if not a poke in the nose, in response. Still, that’s the kind of information the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission wants to collect from lobstermen and Jonah crab fishermen working in the Gulf of Maine and, no surprise, the idea is unpopular. >click here to read<08:59

Maine opposing push to require all lobstermen to report catch data – >click here to read<

DFO rep says agenda for meetings to be determined by fishers

There’s nothing to restrict fishers from talking about issues they have regarding fisheries management, rules and regulations at upcoming meetings scheduled by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO). DFO representatives will be in Central and Eastern Newfoundland over the next couple of weeks — starting in Baie Verte on Jan. 16 and ending in Petty Harbour on Jan. 25 — to meet with fishers. Locations, times and dates >click here to read< 20:31 

Southeast fishermen seek relief from expanding sea otter population

Crabbers and dive fishermen returned to Alaska’s Board of Fish this month seeking changes to commercial fishing regulations in Southeast Alaska for crab and other shellfish impacted by a growing population of sea otters in the region. Some told the board that time is running out on their fisheries because otters are eating clams, sea cucumbers, urchins and Dungeness crab. Wrangell crabber Mike Lockabey told the board the commercial Dungeness crab fleet is being compressed because of the otter predation problem. “It is acute,” Lockabey said. “It will not make the next board cycle without losing fisheries. Not just area, fisheries.” >click here to read< 18:03

Price talks delay Dungeness crab season

Crab boats loaded with pots sat at the docks all weekend while fishermen and processors remained in a gridlock over prices. The commercial Dungeness crab season was set to open Monday in most of Oregon and Washington state, but price negotiations and ocean conditions are keeping boats at home.,,, At one point major processors had offered crabbers $2.30 a pound — not nearly enough to convince them to go out, local crabbers said. >click here to read< 14:12

EU Trawlers Step Up ‘Pulse’ Fishing Efforts, Devastating British Fisheries Ahead of Brexit

European Union trawlers have been stepping up illegal ‘pulse fishing’ in British waters under a special EU derogation, inflicting “total devastation” on the North Sea.  The controversial method of sees fishing vessels — mostly Dutch trawlers — drag electrodes across the seabed to zap sole and plaice off the floor. It is officially banned, but the European Commission — which controls the fisheries of EU member-states through the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) — granted a special derogation for it to be carried out on an “experimental” basis in British fishing grounds in the North Sea. >Video, click here to read< 12:45

Commercial fishing captain accused of dumping dozens of traps

A Florida Keys commercial fishing captain was arrested on felony commercial littering charges this week after investigators say he illegally dumped more than 30 lobster traps along the reef that police considered evidence in an ongoing investigation. Ricardo Hernandez, 53, was booked on 31 counts of commercial dumping and 31 counts of evidence tampering Thursday following a two-years-long investigation by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. >click here to read< 11:35

Riders of the storm: The Islanders keeping fish on the menu

Lobster fisherman Scott Samson is one of many who has been left perplexed and frustrated by the apparent lack of lobsters in Jersey’s waters. Earlier this week Don Thompson, the president of the Jersey Fishermen’s Association, said that rough seas and bad weather had led to the worst period of fishing for ‘12 to 15 years’.  Scott agrees, even going so far as to say that in the 20 years he has worked as a commercial fisherman, the past 12 months have been the toughest he has experienced.  >click here to read< 11:11

Tumby Bay business concerned for fish prices

A Tumby Bay business owner is concerned how pressure put on commercial fishers and the rising number of recreational fishers will affect fish prices going forward. Tumby Bay Takeaway owner Aaron Gates has concerns about how the state government’s commercial licence buy-back and the periodic closure of the Sir Joseph Banks Group to net fishing will affect commercial fishers and fish prices in the future. Late last year the government announced a $20-million voluntary buy-back scheme to remove 100 commercial net and longline licences. >click here to read< 10:25

Making demersal seines more precise

Demersal seines are so effective that the haul can become unmanageable. It has also been difficult to avoid bycatches when using them. Since 2013, fisheries researchers at the Institute of Marine Research have been working to redesign this fishing gear. One aim of the recently completed project was to find a way to separate species.   >Video, click here to read09:58

Islip Town plans to open up more shellfish beds in bay

Islip Town’s program to lease acres of shellfish beds to private companies is on track to expand from 125 acres to more than 1,500 acres. The proposed change must be approved by the state Department of Environmental Conservation, but will be good news for the roughly 120 people and businesses on a waiting list to lease the bottom of the Great South Bay, town officials said. >Photo’s click here to read< 09:22

September 27, 1981 – BAYMEN FEARFUL AS SEWER START NEARS – The Island’s remaining 10,000 independent baymen fear that the opening of the Southwest Sewer District next month will mark the beginning of the end of commercial shell-fishing in the Great South Bay. >click here to read< 12:02

Queensland Fishers can expect ‘biggest changes industry has ever seen’

THE recreational and commercial fishing industries could be on the verge of some of “the largest changes in Queensland fishing”. Under State Government direction leaders in those industries joined environmentalists and government representatives for the first time last week to thrash out necessary changes to boost inshore fish stocks. Under State Government direction leaders in those industries joined environmentalists and government representatives for the first time last week to thrash out necessary changes to boost inshore fish stocks.  >click here to read< 18:51

Board of Fisheries weighs proposals protecting Chinook stocks in Southeast

The future of king salmon fishing in Southeast will change this week as the Board of Fisheries considers proposals to boost struggling Chinook stocks on the Chilkat and Taku rivers. The board convened in Sitka Thursday for a 13-day meeting that will resume Monday morning. The meeting isn’t limited to king salmon. This year’s proposals cover everything from the number of crab pots a commercial Dungeness fisherman can use, to the use of deep-sea release mechanisms for rockfish and the opening of a commercial squid fishery. >click here to read<17:50 

2019-2024 National Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program Public Meetings Scheduled Nationwide

Public meetings will take place across the country using an open-house format, so participants can arrive any time during the scheduled meeting time. At the meetings, participants can ask questions, share information, talk with our team members one-on-one, and learn more about the National OCS Program. We also encourage participants to submit written comments to inform BOEM of specific issues, impacting factors, environmental resources, alternatives to the proposed action, and mitigation measures to consider in its analyses. For those unable to attend one of the scheduled meetings, BOEM is offering a Virtual Meeting Room where participants can visit the same stations available at the open house meetings. There they are able to review and download the same handouts and posters offered at the meetings and provide comments. >click for times, dates, and locations<15:36

Federal prosecutors charge Casey’s Seafood owner in blue crab case

The president of a local seafood company was charged in Newport News federal court Friday with falsely labeling imported crab meat from foreign waters, passing it off as being more expensive Atlantic blue crab. James R. Casey, 74, of Poquoson, who owns Casey’s Seafood in Newport News, is accused of directing his employees to take crab from Asia and South America, blend it with true Atlantic blue crab, and put “Product of the USA” labels on the packages. >click here to read<12:57

Government for hire: Washington State contracted to green nonprofit

The Wall Street Journal’s scrutiny of Washington Governor Jay Insee’s office continues after new details were revealed about policy advisor Reed Schuler. “Basically, what we found out is that the World Resources Institute, which is a green nonprofit, and the Hewlett Foundation — which has invested massively in the green climate change agenda — is paying his salary; is paying his benefits, and paying his expenses,” >click here to read<11:42

Letter to the Editor: Redefining a commercial fisherman

According to a N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries (DMF) release, at the N.C. Marine Fisheries Commission (MFC) meeting last November in Kitty Hawk, there was a motion by Commissioner Chuck Laughridge to, “Ask the chairman to appoint a committee of commission members to develop a definition of a commercial fisherman, with staff support from the Division of Marine Fisheries, to bring an update back to the commission at its February 2018 meeting.”,, So why is MFC Commissioner Chuck Laughridge wanting to define what has already been defined? Interestingly enough, this isn’t the first time the MFC has attempted to define, or rather redefine a commercial fisherman. The real question is why? >click here to read< 09:45

Prince County P.E.I. fishermen assured effluent plans being opposed

It is 326 kilometres away, by road, but a pulp mill in Pictou County, N.S., figured prominently in the Prince County Fishermen’s Association’s recent annual meeting at the O’Leary Legion. The president of the P.E.I. Fishermen’s Association, Bobby Jenkins, and then P.E.I. Minister of Fisheries Alan McIsaac made it clear they are adamantly opposed to Northern Pulp pumping effluent from its mill into Northumberland Strait. All members of the Prince County Fishermen’s Association fish in the Northumberland Strait. >click here to read< 08:53 

Helping Mr. Charles Anderson Sr.

Mr Charles was victimized by theft of his materials. With a retired fisherman’s income, it will be a daunting task for him to replace what has been lost. He has helped so many around here that it is time, IMO, to help him in his need. The nets he builds are the best around here and supplements his living expenses. He’s a living legend in our game and it burns me up to see him suffer because of a thief…Please join me in Helping him to regain his footing… A fundraiser by Joseph Daughtry >click here<21:35

Kelp farm proposed for Long Island Sound

Atlantic Clam Farms of Connecticut is looking to harvest a native species of sea kelp in Long Island Sound. The company, which cultivates hundreds of acres of Greenwich waters for shellfishing, wants to begin its kelp farm in Payea Reach — southeast of Great Captains Island and southwest of Island Beach — and offer the seaweed for human consumption and other commercial uses after an awaited approval from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.,, If the kelp farm is approved, set up at the four-acre area would begin on or after Nov. 1 each calendar year, >click here to read<20:55

The Squid That Sink to the Ocean’s Floor When They Die

While the lives of squid are mysterious in many ways, one gruesome truth is that after mating comes death. First the male dies. Next the female, after making a little pouch of eggs, begins to starve. “She is unable to feed because the egg mass is in front of the mouth,” explains Henk-Jan Hoving, a deep sea biologist at Geomar Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel, Germany. “She probably gets energy from the breakdown of her own tissue, either from the liver or the mental tissue. This is how she stays alive, basically.” Then, once the female is dead and the eggs have hatched, her body will often float to the ocean’s surface and get eaten by birds. >click here to read< 17:43

Government Takes Culinary Action, New Law Outrages As Animal Rights Activists Thrilled

If you’re a Pink Floyd fan, you know the song “Comfortably Numb.” The song has just become the anthem for lobsters in Switzerland. Why? Because the Swiss government has just passed a new animal protection rule banning the culinary art of tossing a live lobster into a boiling pot of water to cook it.,, Animal activists have been successful in urging Swiss officials to pass the law, which focuses on all kinds of animal cruelty, like illegal puppy farms and banning bark collars that send an electric shock to a dog’s neck when barking. >click here to read<17:30

Washington State could end net pens for fish by 2024

By 2024, Washington could ban all net pens where nonnative fish are raised commercially. A bill approved Thursday by the Senate Agriculture, Natural Resources and Water Committee would keep the state from renewing the existing leases as they expire between 2022 and 2024. No new leases are being issued but the state has legal obligations to honor current leases.  The proposal also calls for an extensive study of the practice of raising fish in large pens by companies that lease space in Washington waters. It would be presented to the Legislature in January 2021. >click here to read< 14:41

New bill could put Washington salmon farms in jeopardy – >click here to read

Bering Sea snow crab fishing underway

Bering Sea snow crab fishing was just getting underway, and the first deliveries were expected later this week, according to Ethan Nichols of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game in Unalaska/Dutch Harbor when the snow crab quota was cut back again this year by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. There is a reduced Bering Sea Tanner crab season, thanks to new rules allowing fishing when fewer female crustaceans are present. And small boats in the Unalaska Island area have a Tanner fishery for the first time in two years. >click here to read<13:03